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How to apply testosterone cream

This article was co-authored by Scott Tobis, MD. Dr. Scott Tobis is a board certified Urologist. With more than seven years of experience, he specializes in treating patients for urologic conditions such as urologic cancers, prostate enlargement, vasectomy, kidney stones, frequent/urgent urination, erectile dysfunction, incontinence, and blood in the urine. Dr. Tobis holds a BS in Cellular and Developmental Biology from The University of California, Santa Barbara, and an MD from Dartmouth Medical School. He completed his internship in General Surgery and residency in Urologic Surgery at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and his fellowship in Urologic Oncology and Robotic Surgery at The City of Hope National Medical Center. Dr. Tobis is a diplomat of the American Board of Urology.

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Testosterone topical cream (which is actually more gel-like) is used to treat men whose bodies don’t make enough natural testosterone, which is called hypogonadism. [1] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world’s leading hospitals Go to source Testosterone is a hormone that triggers the growth and development of men’s sex organs and maintains their secondary sex characteristics, such as a deep voice, muscle mass and a relatively hairy body. Testosterone cream/gel is available only via a doctor’s prescription and precautions need to taken while applying it.

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Testosterone creams are hormonal supplements that have a few different applications. They are growing in popularity among weightlifters and athletes for their ability to promote muscle growth by infusing the muscles with high concentrations of testosterone. Testosterone is given to men with deficiencies in the hormone, and some men seek out testosterone creams to help combat the body’s natural decline of testosterone as they age.

Decide why you want to use testosterone cream. If you are targeting specific muscles, you will want to use the cream on those areas. If the cream is for general use, you will apply it to some common spots.

How do I Apply Testosterone Cream for Women?

Target areas of your skin with the least amount of hair, as well as areas featuring significant blood flow. Popular spots for general use include the inner arms and thighs and behind the knees. Cover the area as thoroughly as possible, if you are trying to affect specific muscles.

Apply a half-dosage of testosterone cream twice daily to the vaginal area, if you are a women using testosterone cream to treat a deficiency of the hormone. Men should avoid applying testosterone cream to their genitals unless for treatment of a hormone deficiency, or under doctor’s orders.

If the areas where you are applying the cream are covered in hair, you may want to consider shaving those areas.

Apply the cream one hour prior to physical activity or sexual activity.

Warnings

Do not use more than once a day. Do not use continuously for more than 8 weeks.

Avoid smoking when taking testosterone cream, as it will counteract the medication’s efforts.

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  3. Where to Apply Testosterone Cream
  4. Progesterone Cream & Breastfeeding
  5. How to Convert Lantus Insulin to Nph Insulin
  • Identification
  • Dosage
  • Where to Apply
  • Misconceptions
  • Warnings

If you are a woman with a low or non-existent sex drive, speak to your physician about the use of a topical testosterone cream. Women normally have oestrogen, progesterone and testosterone circulating in their blood streams. As you age, hormone levels may decline. A drop in testosterone levels can result in a loss of libido.

Identification

Testosterone is a male hormone that when applied topically in a cream to a woman’s skin can improve low libido. The white, odorless creams containing testosterone are available in prescription form and low-dose over-the-counter formulas. Although there are no testosterone creams that have FDA approval for use in women, doctors may prescribe it for off-label use.

Dosage

List of Testosterone Creams

Squeeze two units of testosterone cream onto your finger. Recommended dosages for topical creams are often in units or “fingertip” units, according to DermNet NZ 3. One unit equals an amount of cream squeezed from the tube onto the finger, from the tip to the first joint. Two units would equal a strip of cream from the tip of the finger to the second joint, or first knuckle. If you miss your daily dose of testosterone cream, only apply it if you remember within nine hours of your usual dosage time.

  • Squeeze two units of testosterone cream onto your finger.
  • Two units would equal a strip of cream from the tip of the finger to the second joint, or first knuckle.

Where to Apply

Apply testosterone cream to clean skin the same time each day. The most convenient time for many women is right after their daily shower. Massage the testosterone cream into the skin on the inside of one arm or on the skin of an outer thigh. Continue massaging the testosterone cream into your skin until it is fully absorbed. Testosterone cream usually dissolves within 60 seconds when massaged into the skin.

  • Apply testosterone cream to clean skin the same time each day.
  • Continue massaging the testosterone cream into your skin until it is fully absorbed.

Misconceptions

How Do I Take ZMA Anabolic Testosterone Booster?

While there are some creams for women that are marketed to enhance sexual desire, increase pleasure and raise libido after application to the genital area, testosterone creams do not work in this manner. In fact, never apply a testosterone cream to your genitals. Testosterone creams are readily absorbed into the skin, slowly raising testosterone levels over time. Applying testosterone cream to the genitals does not speed up the process.

  • While there are some creams for women that are marketed to enhance sexual desire, increase pleasure and raise libido after application to the genital area, testosterone creams do not work in this manner.
  • Applying testosterone cream to the genitals does not speed up the process.

Warnings

Testosterone creams are not suitable for everyone. Speak to your physician before beginning any testosterone supplementation regimen. Women who have a history of breast or uterine cancer, cardiovascular disease or liver disorders should not use testosterone creams.

It is a fact of life that the older men get, the less testosterone they will have flowing through their veins. And while a natural change during life, low testosterone levels may be the source of some annoying but easily treatable symptoms. In this article, we will discuss testosterone and the benefits of testosterone cream for men.

What is Testosterone?

Essentially, testosterone is the hormone made in the testicles and is important for normal male development. Testosterone has a hand in skeletomuscular development, the building of muscle mass with the bone density to hang it on. It is responsible for all the chaos that occurs with puberty and the driving force behind facial hair, a deeper voice, and adequate and healthy sperm development.

Testosterone hormone levels are vital to male sexual development and functions. The ramping up of this hormone production in puberty is counterpoised by a steady lowering of production in the onset of middle age. While not all men encounter problematically low testosterone levels as they age, there is a growing number who do.

Some men have low testosterone levels. This is called Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome (TD) or Low Testosterone (Low-T). Deficiency means that the body does not have enough of a needed substance. A syndrome is a group of symptoms that, together, suggest a disease or health condition.

What Does Low Testosterone in Men Look Like?

According to standards put in place by the American Urology Association, Low testosterone occurs when an individual produces less than 300 nanograms per deciliter of fluid. What does this mean in layman’s terms? Well, it can spill over into the following symptoms:

  • Low sex drive: As testosterone is a key driver of men’s libido, a decline in testosterone production could lead to a decreased sex drive. For those with significantly lower testosterone levels, such a decrease may be substantial.
  • Fatigue: Fatigue is a frequent complaint among those with lowered testosterone levels – and this relates directly to the loss of muscle mass and increased weight gain.
  • Reduced muscle mass: While low testosterone affects muscle mass, it does not necessarily mean that strength is decreased. However, when accompanied by fatigue and general malaise, this can open the door to weight gain by increasing body fat.
  • Difficulty concentrating: Low levels of testosterone have been associated with cognitive functions such as memory and the ability to concentrate, which, in turn, has been found to affect mood negatively.
  • Erectile Dysfunction: In addition to being the male libido hormone, testosterone is also crucial for achieving and maintaining an erection by activating other chemicals in the body to jump on board.

If you experience one or more of these symptoms, then a visit to your primary care physician for tests is highly recommended.

Uses of Testosterone Cream

Testosterone cream is an effective avenue of testosterone therapy for people suffering from low testosterone. And low testosterone can result from more than the natural aging process. For instance, it is used as a therapy for those born with Klinefelter Syndrome . Testosterone therapy (TT) is used to supplement the body’s natural source of testosterone when the testicles and been damaged or have had to be removed.

The uses of TT are expanding as knowledge in the field of testosterone deficiency is growing. More people are being prescribed testosterone cream as a convenient and effective treatment for their testosterone deficiency.

Benefits of Testosterone Cream

  • Increases muscle mass, strength, and endurance
  • Improves libido and sex drive
  • Reduces visceral and subcutaneous fat
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Increases bone density
  • Collagen and skin tone support
  • Helps protect against cardiovascular disease and hypertension
  • Improves cognition and memory
  • Lowers insulin resistance

How to Apply Testosterone Cream

The application procedure depends on the prescription instructions, although your typical application is once per day. Apply the cream at the same time daily, preferably when you can remember to do so. Immediately after drying off from your morning shower is a good time to do this.

Since different companies produce testosterone differently, your doctor will understand the nature of your prescription. Please read their instructions carefully and contact them immediately if you have any questions or concerns.

How Long Does it Take for Testosterone Cream to Work?

One of the most common questions about testosterone creams is their effectiveness and timeline. In other words, how long will it take for you to feel the results? It is a good question and can be answered simply by saying that your result may vary depending on dosage and application regimen. Discussing your situation with a doctor is really the best way to get accurate data for yourself.

However, in strictly general terms, the efficacy is usually felt within 4 to 6 weeks of starting the treatment. But in some cases, the results may not be realized until around the three-month mark.

How to Buy Testosterone Cream

Buy testosterone cream from a reputable pharmacy and only with a prescription from your doctor. Testosterone therapy involves changing critical functions of your body and so should not be treated as a physique enhancer (like steroids used to be). By adjusting your hormone levels, your entire body is involved. Your doctor needs to have you under observation so that they can help you if, at any time during your regimen, something is not looking right.

Some companies tout their testosterone cream over the counter and effective, but there is no substantive research to back up that claim. It is better to save your money and allow a legitimate professional to be your guide. This is where EVOLVE comes into your life! Our Patient Care team consists of qualified, knowledgeable, and supportive industry experts. Testosterone therapy and hormone optimization are what we do best, and we have the credentials to back them up.

Our team of professionals will review your lab results and match you with the proper dosage your body needs. To get started with your testosterone cream treatment, schedule a call with Patient Care @EVOLVE today!

This article is for educational use, any treatment decisions should be used in consultation with a medical practitioner.

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How to apply testosterone cream

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Therapy Benefits

Testosterone HRT (Cream / Injectable) Benefits:

  • Improved Sexual Performance.
  • Reverses Age Related Tiredness.
  • Energy, Stamina and Endurance Increased.
  • Mental Function Improvements.
  • Improves Feeling of Well-Being.
  • Much Stronger Muscles.
  • Reduces changes of Heart Disease.
  • Improved Concentration and Focus.
  • Cholesterol Levels Reduced.

HGH (injectable) Therapy Benefits:

  • Burn Fat and Improve BMI.
  • Build Lean Muscle and Physic.
  • Reduce Cellulite.
  • Faster Healing, And Enhance immune functions.
  • Increase Stamina And Endurance.
  • Better Exercise Performance.
  • Increase Your Motivation.
  • Strong Anti-aging Properties.
  • Reduce Fatigue And Mid Day Crashes.
  • Deep Restful Sleep, And Feel Refreshed in Morning.
  • Soften Skin And Wrinkles, Younger Looking.
  • Improve Sexual Performance.
  • Help Control Depression And Mood Swings.
  • Help Control High blood pressure.
  • Increase HDL (good cholesterol).
  • Decrease LDL (bad cholesterol).

A testosterone cream is simply a form of testosterone medication; while it comes in a cream-like gel substance the active hormonal ingredient is simply testosterone. Be it a testosterone cream or injectable testosterone the bottom line remains the same, however, mode of action, potency, efficiency and overall effectiveness can greatly vary from one to the next. Generally there are two specific testosterone gels worth mentioning and both carry very similar properties with one distinguishing difference. However, while one was created for specific performance enhancing most testosterone cream is used in hormone replacement plans and all are applied in a transdermal form.

AndroGel

Without question AndroGel is the most commonly used testosterone cream on the market and one of the primary forms of therapy for those who undergo low testosterone treatment. The application of this hormonal compound is very simple, take it out of the bottle and rub it on the skin; pretty basic but you will normally want to apply it to the upper arms or shoulders and simply allow the testosterone to soak in. It is important you allow ample time for the absorption process to take effect; meaning, you will need to keep the applied area dry after application for several hours.

The King of Testosterone Cream:

Known simply as The Cream it was the testosterone cream manufactured by the infamous Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative (BALCO) and for all intense purposes is identical to AndroGel; actually we can say it is AndroGel. The mode of action, the ratings and absorption is the same. What can be said of AndroGel can be said of the famous BALCO mixture; this testosterone cream simply has fame because of the name that surrounds it with one distinguishable difference. The Cream was created for the purpose of beating steroid drug tests and it did so perfectly. A combination of testosterone and epitestosterone, the mixture allowed testosterone levels to rise while simultaneously increasing epitestosterone. By matching this increase, two factors often measured in a steroid test, when they increase in equal parts detection will fail.

How to apply testosterone cream

Testosterone Cream Efficiency:

Most injectable testosterone does not have a 100% absorption rating but many are close; however, as it pertains to testosterone cream it only has about a 10% absorption rating at best, meaning most of the applied drug never makes it into the blood stream in a usable manner. For example, if we inject 100mg of Testosterone-Propionate we will receive approximately close to the full dose, conversely if we apply 100mg of testosterone cream we will only receive approximately 10mg of usable testosterone. For this reason a testosterone cream dose will need to be much higher than an injectable form in order to receive an adequate dose.

The Purpose of Testosterone Cream:

In general the only suitable purpose for testosterone cream is in a hormone replacement plan designed to aid in bringing low levels of the hormone back to normal. For performance enhancing purposes this mode of testosterone application will prove to be weak and not the desired form to meet the desired end. To receive a true performance enhancing boost from this form of testosterone you would need to apply it in massive amounts multiple times per day to get even close to standard performance enhancing doses. Even so, athletes who are looking for a very slight boost may find this form of medication useful, however most will not.

Side-Effects of Testosterone Cream:

The common side-effects of injectable testosterone are the same when the hormone is applied in gel form; side-effects such as Gynecomastia, water retention, high blood pressure, cholesterol issues and other aromatizing effects are all possible. However, testosterone cream presents one possible side-effect injectable testosterone does not; irritation of the skin or burns at the applied area. It is impossible to know if you will fall prey to this side-effect however of all the possible side-effects this will prove to be the most prominent one.

The Bottom Line:

Testosterone cream is rarely found on the black market; in most cases if you desire to use it you will need to visit a physician or hormone replacement clinic and receive a prescription. It should be easy to understand why this product is rarely found on the black market due to it being a poor performance enhancer in-terms of how we largely define enhancement but for those who simply need therapy to improve low testosterone levels this can be a fine choice and will normally get the job done.

Hellvis Jones

Member
  • Jun 4, 2021
  • #1
  • Vince

    Super Moderator
    • Jun 4, 2021
  • #2
  • In two weeks I’m meeting with an anti-aging doctor who will most probably prescribe me testosterone cream. The reason I want to try TRT is to cure my erectile dysfunction, which I’ve had ever since I became sexually active 15 years ago.

    I don’t know the details yet, because she’s waiting for my blood tests results before to prescribe anything. But she looked at some tests I made in the past, and she said that my testosterone was too low for someone my age and that she would probably prescribe testosterone.

    She suggested that I put the cream directly on my genitals. My question is, does that make any sense? I know it might sound very vague, because I’m not giving enough details. I’ll come back on this forum to post those details when I get my prescription in two weeks, but in the meantime, I’m trying to find out if what she suggested makes sense or not.

    Have You Tried Any Commercial Transdermal Testosterone Product?

    Well-Known Member
    • Jun 4, 2021
  • #3
  • Yes, that is common. On your scrotum, not your penis.

    Also, ask your doc to prescribe you 5mg daily Tadalafil too. In fact, I would not take no for an answer on this. not that they’d have any reason to say no.

    Dicky

    Active Member
    • Jun 5, 2021
  • #4
  • David House

    Member
    • Jun 5, 2021
  • #5
  • Thanks a lot. Glad to see it actually makes sense, and that putting cream on the scrotum seems pretty common.

    I’ve been using Viagra for years and it works very well. I don’t know if daily Cialis will do the trick, because it’s a lower dose, but I’ll definitely keep that in mind. It would be nice, though, it would allow me to have a more spontaneous sex life.

    camygod

    Member
    • Jun 6, 2021
  • #6
  • Abuser200

    Member
    • Jun 6, 2021
  • #7
  • Cooper

    Member
    • Jun 7, 2021
  • #8
  • Rentner2022

    New Member
    • Jun 7, 2021
  • #9
  • Can i ask you how you made the switch? What was your substitution ratio? I (54M) am currently taking 130 Test Cyp a week but want to try scrotal cream to see if it is better at relieving libido symptoms. Currently 130 TC/wk (split 3x) puts me at about the right overall level (TT at 1000, free T at 25, E2 sensitive at 34). But I don’t want to switch entirely, I want to move to a split protocol.

    So here’s what I was thinking- if one click is .25 ml and it’s a 50 mg/ml cream, then that’s 12.5 Test per click. At a 50% absorption rate that 6 mg Test absorbed per click. 130 mg/wk injected is 18.5 mg/day. I think TC is about 70% Test so that’s 13 mg Test/day. So if I wanted to start with a split protocol adding one click a day of cream means I can cut my TC injections by half (to say maybe 70 mg/wk)?

    Is that similar to what you did?

    DixieWrecked

    Well-Known Member
    • Jun 8, 2021
  • #10
  • camygod

    Member
    • Jun 8, 2021
  • #11
  • DixieWrecked

    Well-Known Member
    • Jun 8, 2021
  • #12
  • madman

    Super Moderator
    • Jun 9, 2021
  • #13
  • Your FT will be even higher as unfortunately, you did not use the TT (LC/MS-MS).

    Most likely hitting TT 1500-2000 ng/dL.

    You tested 8 hours post-application.

    Trough levels will most likely be high.

    The most accurate assay for TT (LC/MS-MS) should always be alongside FT (Equilibrium Dialysis or Ultrafiltration).

    Zibernet

    Guest
    • Jun 9, 2021
  • #14
  • Your FT will be even higher as unfortunately, you did not use the TT (LC/MS-MS).

    Most likely hitting TT 1500-2000 ng/dL.

    You tested 8 hours post-application.

    Trough levels will most likely be high.

    The most accurate assay for TT (LC/MS-MS) should always be alongside FT (Equilibrium Dialysis or Ultrafiltration).

    madman

    Super Moderator
    • Jun 9, 2021
  • #15
  • He is applying once daily.

    Top it off that even if he were to test at true trough whether once/twice daily application
    we would have no clue where his FT truly sits unless he tested TT (LC/MS-MS).

    Although he used one of the most accurate assays for FT (Equilibrium Ultrafiltration) his TT was not tested using the most accurate assay (LC/MS-MS) and as you can see his lab value capped out at >1500 ng/dL.

    DixieWrecked

    Well-Known Member
    • Jun 9, 2021
  • #16
  • He is applying once daily.

    Top it off that even if he were to test at true trough whether once/twice daily application
    we would have no clue where his FT truly sits unless he tested TT (LC/MS-MS).

    Although he used one of the most accurate assays for FT (Equilibrium Ultrafiltration) his TT was not tested using the most accurate assay (LC/MS-MS) and as you can see his lab value capped out at >1500 ng/dL.

    DixieWrecked

    Well-Known Member
    • Jun 9, 2021
  • #17
  • vandar100

    New Member
    • Jun 9, 2021
  • #18
  • In two weeks I’m meeting with an anti-aging doctor who will most probably prescribe me testosterone cream. The reason I want to try TRT is to cure my erectile dysfunction, which I’ve had ever since I became sexually active 15 years ago.

    I don’t know the details yet, because she’s waiting for my blood tests results before to prescribe anything. But she looked at some tests I made in the past, and she said that my testosterone was too low for someone my age and that she would probably prescribe testosterone.

    She suggested that I put the cream directly on my genitals. My question is, does that make any sense? I know it might sound very vague, because I’m not giving enough details. I’ll come back on this forum to post those details when I get my prescription in two weeks, but in the meantime, I’m trying to find out if what she suggested makes sense or not.

    BigJohn

    Member
    • Nov 21, 2013
  • #1
  • Nelson Vergel

    Founder, ExcelMale.com
    • Nov 21, 2013
  • #2
  • For men with poor DHT response when on testosterone, using special creams that you can rub on testicles works at increasing DHT more effectively. Because of the high 5 alpha-reductase activity in the scrotal skin, blood DHT levels are above the upper normal range. DHT is linked to sex drive and many of the benefits (and some of the side effects like acne and hair loss) are attributed to this testosterone metabolite. This caused concern that prostate disease could develop. However, in hypogonadal patients treated for up to 10 years with the trans scrotal films, no untoward side-effects developed.

    A few of the guys on here use a special compounded cream that does not burn your scrotum (Androgel, Testim, Axiron, and Fortesta can burn that area, so do not use them!). My DHT is good enough, so I do not use it.

    Gene Devine

    Super Moderator
    • Nov 21, 2013
  • #3
  • It’s funny, I had a renowned TRT Doc say to me one time that “we say we supplement with Testosterone when what we really should be saying is we increase DHT levels!”

    DHT is 8 times more androgenic than testosterone and what really makes us men!

    BigJohn

    Member
    • Nov 21, 2013
  • #4
  • Peter Luscombe

    Member
    • Nov 22, 2013
  • #5
  • Keith Willse

    Member
    • Nov 22, 2013
  • #6
  • BigJohn

    Member
    • Nov 22, 2013
  • #7
  • Keith Willse

    Member
    • Nov 22, 2013
  • #8
  • skycop00

    Member
    • Sep 10, 2018
  • #9
  • Attachments

    Nelson Vergel

    Founder, ExcelMale.com
    • Sep 10, 2018
  • #10
  • Great paper. Thanks!

    skycop00

    Member
    • Sep 10, 2018
  • #11
  • Nelson Vergel

    Founder, ExcelMale.com
    • Sep 10, 2018
  • #12
  • One of our members have had great results using scrotum application:

    Vince Carter

    Banned
    • Sep 10, 2018
  • #13
  • 100. I also testing verified returned to baseline 24hrs later. Never monitored this for Test or E purposes, only DHT as I continued using Cypionate and Anastrozole.

    I think 2 clicks is 25mg IIRC

    If I EVER had to get off Cyp injections I think I’d go to cream on the scrotum application exclusively.

    skycop00

    Member
    • Sep 10, 2018
  • #14
  • Nelson Vergel

    Founder, ExcelMale.com
    • Nov 9, 2018
  • #15
  • Nelson Vergel

    Founder, ExcelMale.com
    • Jan 26, 2019
  • #16
  • Andrology. 2017 Jul;5(4):725-731. doi: 10.1111/andr.12357. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

    Pharmacokinetics of testosterone cream applied to scrotal skin.

    Iyer R1, Mok SF1, Savkovic S1, Turner L1, Fraser G1, Desai R1, Jayadev V1, Conway AJ1, Handelsman DJ1.

    Abstract
    Scrotal skin is thin and has high steroid permeability, but the pharmacokinetics of testosterone via the scrotal skin route has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to define the pharmacokinetics of testosterone delivered via the scrotal skin route. The study was a single-center, three-phase cross-over pharmacokinetic study of three single doses (12.5, 25, 50 mg) of testosterone cream administered in random sequence on different days with at least 2 days between doses to healthy eugonadal volunteers with endogenous testosterone suppressed by administration of nandrolone decanoate. Serum testosterone, DHT and estradiol concentrations were measured by liquid chromatograpy, mass spectrometry in extracts of serum taken before and for 16 h after administration of each of the three doses of testosterone cream to the scrotal skin. Testosterone administration onto the scrotal skin produced a swift (peak 1.9-2.8 h), dose-dependent (p

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Question

    You recently answered a question here explaining that testosterone gel is best absorbed by areas of the body where there is less fat. I’ve been applying Androgel to my abdomen (stomach) and upper arms and shoulders as instructed by the manufacturer. Should I be applying it to other areas of my body instead? The gentleman asking the previous question stated that he was instructed to apply the gel to the shin, ankle and/or top of the foot. Thank you for your valuable work.

    Answer

    Companies have to follow what it is shown in their medication label (package insert). They CANNOT say anything different since they may be promoting an off label use. And they can be fined for doing so.

    Having said that, the companies that sell Androgel and Testim used the abdominal, shoulders and arm area in their studies, hence they tell people to use those areas only.

    I have read two studies that measured blood levels of testosterone in men using different parts of the body, and those sections with lower fat tended to provide better pharmacokinetics. In fact, one of them found that the upper back section is the best. But, who can reach there?

    A recent study showed that when a testosterone gel was applied to the abdomen approximately 30%-40% lower bioavailability (AUC0-24) was observed compared to upper arms/shoulders application. However, the study does not discourage using the abdominal area. Testosterone gel- abdomen versus shoulders/arms

    A HIV related study found that Androgel can decrease waist circumference at about 1 inch in 26 weeks in men applying Androgel to their abdominals (the loss was mostly subcutaneous fat, not the deeper visceral fat that may be associated with metabolic problems). Would this same waist circumference reduction happen if we used other body areas? I have not seen any studies that attempt to answer this question.

    However, be careful about applying testosterone to body areas that may come in contact with women or kids (if you have kids and need to hold them, for instance). Transference of testosterone to kids can affect them negatively. Transference of testosterone in women over periods of time can increase their risk of masculinization. So, legs (if you are wearing long pants) are not a bad idea.

    One more thing: if you apply testosterone gel to your arms, you may get a very high testosterone blood level if your doctor tests for it since they extract the blood from your arm. The testosterone on your skin can be sucked in by the syringe and give you a false high reading.

    A company recently got their arm pit testosterone lotion approved to lower this transference risk.

    How to apply testosterone cream

    category: News

    Testosterone Cream For Your Balls? Is It A Superior Alternative To Injections?

    Have you been skeptical of testosterone creams? Were they never your top choice? Have you thought they have historically been ineffective?

    Well, you MAY have been right. Traditionally, the concentrations of transdermal testosterone were too low, and it was difficult to control the delivery of the dosage; not to mention poor absorption of testosterone via skin due to sweat glands, location of the application, and other factors.

    Transdermal testosterone had been used for years to treat patients with low testosterone symptoms. Most transdermal testosterone is prescribed in a gel form and is applied to the upper arms and shoulders. When prescribed in a cream form with the appropriate base compound, transdermal testosterone can be applied to the scrotum. Scrotal skin is thin and has high steroid permeability. It is extremely important to avoid using a cream or gel with alcohol as alcohol is harmful for scrotal skin health.

    The literature and highly trained physicians with clinical experience have proven that trans-scrotal testosterone cream is a highly effective delivery method of testosterone.

    The Andrology Department at Concord Hospital and ANZAC Research Institute did a study on testosterone cream applied to scrotal skin, and in their research they indicated that testosterone via transdermal delivery is an excellent method to achieve therapeutic concentrations of testosterone. Most importantly, the patient’s symptoms resolved without side effects. They noted that the bioavailability of testosterone via the scrotal skin is strikingly higher than other application areas using the same testosterone cream and in this study they observed about an EIGHTFOLD increase in testosterone bioavailability.

    Testosterone Injections vs Testosterone Cream?

    For one, it’s certainly less invasive as you don’t have to spend the rest of your life injecting yourself, thereby lessening scar tissue formation. Anybody looking for a faster and completely pain-free experience with testosterone optimization therapy should consider it.

    The cream also offers a slightly better increase in dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels; therefore enhancing erectile strength and overall sexual functioning. As DHT is crucial to a man’s libido, it makes sense that the trans-scrotal cream has an edge over intramuscular injections. The increase in DHT and potentially PSA is transient at best (and why it’s critically important you work with a doctor who is an expert at using transdermal delivery systems in their practice).

    The daily use of cream is a great protocol for mimicking endogenous production of testosterone; keeping your testosterone level fluctuation to a minimum.

    The only real downside with the trans-scrotal cream is the possibility of wiping it off on someone else by accident.

    You will have to avoid certain activities for up to 90 minutes for maximum absorption of testosterone to take place (sex, working out, and showering).

    Aside from these primary differentiators, the creams and injections provide very similar results under the guidance of a progressive-minded physician. You will end up getting the same physiological benefits with either method: muscle mass gain, cognitive enhancement, greater energy levels, and endurance.

    At the end of the day whatever treatment the patient will be the most compliant with should be the delivery method of choice. Either way of administering therapeutic testosterone can help you optimize your testosterone and estrogen levels when used properly. It is important for patients to realize that hormone optimization is not a one size fits all approach and there are several great options for them.

    Book an appointment now

    Your first visit is $99, this fee includes a confidential consultation with one of our medical providers, PSA testing, testosterone assessment, body composition analysis, and a customized “test dose” of our proven medication if needed. HSA (Health Savings Account), FSA (Flexible Spending Account), and Care Credit cards are accepted!

    How to apply testosterone creamWe all need testosterone, even women do. AndroFeme is a testosterone replacement therapy for women. It is the only bioidentical therapy of its kind that is specifically designed for women to ensure women get the most out of their testosterone therapy. Testosterone is needed to nurture the reproductive system and achieve good sexual health, in particular, good levels of libido and arousal. AndroFeme has been designed for women only. If you are male and need to use testosterone therapy, then try using AndroForte for men. It is the AndroFeme equivalent for men. Apply AndroFeme daily and as directed for optimal results and a great sex life!

    What is AndroFeme
    AndroFeme is a bioidentical, transdermal cream that helps women supplement natural testosterone production when it is low.

    In general, women need to supplement testosterone production when they reach perimenopause, menopause or post-menopause. Sometimes it is needed due to an existing medical condition or after going through a hysterectomy and/or oophorectomy. Without good testosterone levels women may suffer from low libido and other kids of female sexual dysfunction alongside a decrease in bone density, loss of muscle tone, anxiety and depression.

    The testosterone ingredient in AndroFeme is bioidentical, meaning it is the same as the body’s own naturally produced testosterone. Using a bioidentical cream is thought to have a more beneficial effect (with better results) than using a synthetic form. This is because the body experiences it as a natural extension of the testosterone being produced by the ovaries.

    How to apply AndroFeme?
    Dosage depends on your stage of life or medical condition (the reason you are using testosterone therapy). The application site and methods are always the same though. The recommended standard dose is 0.5ml. After using AndroFeme for a few weeks you can start adjusting to dosage if you feel it is too much or too little. Normally the dosage increases, not many women feel 0.5ml is too much. Always consult with your doctor, have bloodwork done and take a symptomatic test before adjusting the dosage. Too much testosterone in women can have adverse and sometimes irreversible side effects.

    How to measure the correct dose of AndroFeme – AndroFeme is packaged with its own applicator syringe so it is easy for you to get the dosage correct. The applicator is marked with 0.5ml increments. Open the cap and gently squeeze the bottom of the tube until you see the cream reach the tip of the nozzle at the tube opening. Insert the syringe tip into the nozzle, hold upside down. Then squeeze the bottom of the tube while withdrawing the plunger from the applicator. This will cause the cream to flow down the syringe and into the applicator barrel. When you have reached the desired dosage level, stop, withdraw the syringe and close the cap tightly. If you notice some bubbles in the barrel top up the barrel to just past the desired marking. If there are a lot of bubbles or the barrel did not fill up correctly, then clean out the barrel and start the process again to be sure you are getting an accurate dose.

    Push the plunger down to release the cream onto the skin and massage in until it is fully absorbed.

    Where to apply AndroFeme – AndroFeme should be applied to the lower torso our outer thigh depending on where is most comfortable for you. Choose an application site and stick to it, try not to juggle the application sites. Avoid applying AndroFeme to broken, inflamed or damaged skin. Avoid using deodorant or moisturiser on the application site and avoid showering or exercise where you sweat for at least 1-hour post-application. This is to ensure that the cream has been fully absorbed into the skin and blood stream before it comes into contact with other factors.

    How often to apply AndroFeme? – Apply AndroFeme every day, ideally in the morning, at the same time each morning. This will help your body better cope with absorption and integration.

    I forgot to apply AndroFeme? What do I do?
    Apply AndroFeme in the morning, at the same time each morning. If you miss a dose of AndroFeme it is important not to double dose (apply two doses at the same time). This can cause an overdose of testosterone, which can be dangerous. If you are late taking a dose then take it as soon as you remember. If you already reach the time of the next dose then apply the next dose as normal. Nothing serious will happen if you miss a single dose completely.

    AndroFeme warnings and side effects
    As with all medications, there can be side effects when using a testosterone replacement therapy like AndroFeme. The most common testosterone side effects include skin rashes or irritation on the skin where the AndroFeme is applied. You can also experience nausea, headaches, acne, male pattern hair loss (on the head), deepening of the voice, increased body hair and weight gain. Sometimes using testosterone can affect your menstruation cycle.

    Do not apply AndroFeme to the genital area.

    Always wash your hands with soap and water thoroughly after application.

    Avoid applying moisturiser, perfume or deodorant to the application area. It can affect the success of the testosterone therapy.

    Do not swim, shower or do heavy exercise that causes sweating for at least 1 hour after you apply AndroFeme. Likewise, you should not engage in close skin contact with someone else during this time. This is to ensure that the AndroFeme has properly absorbed into the skin and bloodstream and that there is no issue of transference to someone else.

    For a full list of AndroFeme side effects see this information leaflet.

    We get asked so many questions about using AndroFeme testosterone cream for women. Here are a few of the most popular questions….. and answers:

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Q. Why do women need testosterone?

    A. In women, as with men, testosterone plays a crucial role in sexual motivation (libido), energy levels, mood and bone metabolism. Women produce testosterone from the ovaries and adrenal glands. When testosterone production declines, libido and energy levels often diminish. Supplementing small amounts of testosterone will restore blood levels to normal ranges, usually resolving symptoms.

    Q. Is testosterone safe to use in women?

    A. Yes, provided the dose used is appropriate for maintaining blood levels within normal ranges for women. The use of the Lawley testosterone cream is only to replace the lack of natural testosterone production from the adrenal glands and ovaries.

    Q. Will I grow hair, muscles or have voice changes when using AndroFeme testosterone cream for women?

    A. No, provided recommended doses are adhered to. Women using AndroFeme testosterone cream, for example, must have their blood testosterone checked regularly, especially upon starting testosterone treatment. This ensures the dose used is appropriate for the individual.

    Q. How much and how often do I apply the Lawley testosterone cream for women?

    A. The cream is applied once daily to clean dry skin. It can be applied at any time of the day. The usual starting dose of 1% testosterone cream in women is 0.5mL (5 mg testosterone) via measured applicator, applied once daily to the lower abdomen or upper outer thigh.
    Q. How soon after starting AndroFeme testosterone cream for women will my energy and libido improve?

    A. Testosterone blood levels reach a “steady-state” after two weeks of once-daily use. Usually, energy levels improve within the first three to four weeks. Blood levels should be taken three to four weeks after commencement. An improved libido usually follows within four to six weeks after starting treatment.

    Q. For how long can I continue to use AndroFeme testosterone cream?

    A. Many women have used the Lawley testosterone cream continuously for over ten years. Clinical trials have been conducted with testosterone products in women for decades. Minimal side effects have been observed when the testosterone blood levels have been maintained within the normal range for women. It is important a blood test is
    conducted at least every six months while using testosterone cream to check levels remain within the normal limits for women.

    Q. What safety checks do I need before starting AndroFeme testosterone cream?

    A. Your doctor needs to conduct a general women’s health check including testosterone blood levels prior to starting testosterone treatment. Testosterone should not be used if you have breast cancer or if the health check shows any
    irregularities. These must be investigated fully first. If you have chronic liver or kidney disease, testosterone should only be used with strict medical supervision. Testosterone blood levels should be taken two to three weeks after starting treatment because of individual variation in skin absorption. If the blood testosterone level is elevated above the upper limit the dose can easily be adjusted downwards.
    Q. If I stop using testosterone cream, how quickly will the testosterone be out of my system?

    A. Once supplementation with testosterone cream is stopped, blood testosterone levels will fall to baseline levels within 72 hours. Pre-treatment symptoms will usually return with this decline in blood testosterone levels.

    Q. Is AndroFeme testosterone cream my only option for using testosterone?

    A. There is only one listed pharmaceutical-grade testosterone product in the world available for use in women—the Lawley 1% testosterone cream.

    Q. How long will a tube of testosterone cream last?

    A. A single 50 mL tube of the Lawley testosterone cream for women will provide between 50 to 100 days of treatment depending upon the dose used. Using the recommended starting dose of 0.5mL, a tube will last 100 days.

    Q. Where do I apply testosterone cream?

    A. AndroFeme is applied to the skin of the lower torso or upper outer thigh. The testosterone is absorbed by the skin and passes into the blood. The cream is applied once daily. It is rubbed into the skin like a moisturiser. There should be no residual cream on the skin after about 60 seconds of massaging into the skin. The cream is white, odourless and non-staining.

    Understand more on testosterone in women:

    The information in this article has been taken with permission from the official Lawley booklet on Understanding Testosterone for Women.

    Bioidentical Testosterone Therapy for Men

    For men, better aging includes testosterone therapy. It’s the foundation for everything we do to get you back to being you. We’ll restore your testosterone to healthy levels and we’ll do it the right way.

    The Facts about Bioidentical Testosterone Therapy for Men

    1. Injections are the best way to go and two times per week is ideal. Injections performed less often won’t get optimal results.
    2. Going to a clinic for injections is unnecessary. They are easy to perform yourself, and we provide the information you need to do just that.
    3. Can’t stand needles? If injections simply aren’t an option for you, topical cream compounded at a suitable strength is the next best solution.
    4. Pellets and patches are ineffective and taking testosterone by mouth is unsafe.
    5. Results are typically felt in as little as 2 weeks. For most men, symptoms of low testosterone will be resolved completely in 3 to 6 weeks.
    6. Testosterone therapy isn’t just about testosterone. We manage estrogen levels, too.
    7. Safe and effective treatment means regular monitoring. You’ll lab test two times per year, see the doctor one time per year, and we’ll check in with you at regular intervals.
    8. Testosterone therapy works best when all hormones are optimized. If there are imbalances in DHEA, thyroid, growth hormone, cortisol, or pregnenalone, we have appropriate solutions available.

    Methods of Treatment

    Men need a lot of testosterone to feel good. There are two ways to get enough into your body on a consistent basis.

    1. Testosterone Injections

    We recommend injections for men who don’t have an issue with needles. Here’s why:

    • Injections provide a pre-set, measured amount of testosterone. In other words, they are very precise.
    • With twice-weekly injections, your body will receive a steady supply of testosterone. No peaks and valleys.
    • When injected intramuscularly, testosterone “pools” in the muscle. As blood flows by this “pool” of testosterone, small amounts are released into the blood stream. This mimics the way your body would release testosterone naturally.
    • With injections, there is less conversion of testosterone to DHT. This means less stress on the prostate and a lower incidence of hair loss.
    • Self-administered injections are simple and painless when using a small needle.

    2. Testosterone Topical Cream

    Testosterone cream has its benefits, particularly for men who prefer not to use needles. It has some drawbacks, too. Here are the pros and cons:

    • Topical cream provides a consistent release of testosterone into the body. However, absorption can vary, making it somewhat less precise than injections.
    • Even when custom-compounded at a high strength, some men will have a difficult time absorbing enough testosterone through their skin to achieve optimal levels.
    • Caution must be exercised to ensure that transference does not occur through skin-to-skin contact with other people.
    • The conversion rate of testosterone to DHT is higher when using topical cream. Elevated DHT can cause hair loss in some men, and can put stress on the prostate.

    Methods Of Treatment Not Used

    1. Testosterone Pellets

    Testosterone pellets are surgically placed under the skin. They release testosterone for about three months, and then have to be replaced. Besides requiring a surgical procedure every three months, pellets have significant limitations:

    • Pellets release too much testosterone for the first several weeks and then later, not enough. The result is a rollercoaster ride in how you feel.
    • Because equilibrium is never achieved for testosterone, managing estrogen on a consistent basis is impossible. Both hormones become constantly moving targets.
    • Lab testing for testosterone and estrogen are rendered meaningless. You can’t measure something that isn’t stable.
    • Having a surgical procedure every three months opens the door to potential infection and scarring.

    2. Testosterone Patches

    Testosterone patches are commercially produced patches that are usually applied to the scrotum. Like pellets, they have limitations:

    • Though they provide good time release, they tend to be—as you can imagine—quite uncomfortable.
    • They commonly cause skin irritation.
    • Dosing is typically inadequate, and can’t be fine-tuned.

    At Renew Youth, we do not use delivery methods that are unsafe, ineffective, or unproven. If it isn’t safe and effective, it will not be a part of any treatment program we provide. Period.

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Are testosterone creams safe for women?

    If you’re a woman who has been diagnosed with too low a level of testosterone, chances are you have sought out hormone replacement therapy of some kind.

    The different methods of testosterone therapy for women range from patches and pellets to gels and creams.

    Testosterone creams for women are a popular option for those looking to increase their t-levels in a safe and healthy way.

    But before you start slathering on the lotion, be sure to due your research on whether testosterone cream for women causes any negative side effects.

    Does Testosterone Cream For Women Cause Any Side Effects?

    While women with low levels of testosterone can benefit from testosterone therapy, too much testosterone can cause unwanted side effects — some that could even be irreversible.

    Because of this, it is extremely important for any woman seeking to increase her testosterone levels to use products like prescription testosterone cream under the guidance and supervision of a medical professional.

    What Are Some Of The Testosterone Cream For Women Side Effects?

    BREAST CHANGES

    • Breast tenderness

    – Decreased breast size

    HAIR CHANGES

    • Hair growth on the face and body
    • Hair loss on the scalp

    REPRODUCTIVE CHANGES

    • Changes in menstrual cycle
    • Enlarged clitoris size

    SKIN CHANGES

    • Acne
    • Blistering
    • Burning
    • Dry skin
    • Itching
    • Rash
    • Soreness
    • Swelling

    Where Should You Apply Testosterone Cream For Women?

    Women should apply testosterone cream compound to clean skin once every day at roughly the same time. The cream should be applied on the inside of the arm or on the outer thigh and rubbed in until it is fully absorbed.

    How Long Does It Take Testosterone Cream To Work?

    While testosterone replacement therapy works at different rates for different women, you can expect testosterone cream to start working after 4 to 6 weeks of beginning treatment.

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    How to apply testosterone cream

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    Therapy Benefits

    Testosterone HRT (Cream / Injectable) Benefits:

    • Improved Sexual Performance.
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    • Burn Fat and Improve BMI.
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    By Sarah E. | Updated: Jun 18, 2020

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Vaginal dryness is a common symptom of menopause and aging that affects a large percentage of women. Menopause is a natural change in the body that causes estrogen levels to decrease, and this can result in a range of symptoms, including vaginal dryness.

    Testosterone cream and estrogen cream are both promoted to solve vaginal dryness, but these two treatments vary greatly in how they treat vaginal dryness and in their potential side effects.

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Testosterone to Treat Menopause Symptoms

    Testosterone is widely viewed as the hormone responsible for sex drive, and testosterone does play a role in sex drive and arousal in women. Testosterone is not FDA approved for use by women, and different medical organizations have begun recommending that men be prescribed testosterone with less frequency and that they be aware of the side effects of using testosterone. All women have some testosterone naturally in their bodies, and testosterone levels in women decline from when they are in their twenties to when they are in their forties. However, there is no clear connection between testosterone levels and menopause.

    Low testosterone levels can be caused by the surgical removal of the ovaries or uterus, ovary failure, use of some birth controls, and problems with the pituitary gland or adrenal gland, two glands that are part of the endocrine system and produce hormones. Research has shown that testosterone therapy may help boost libido in women. However, this research is not conclusive and more needs to be done to have a clear understanding of the role testosterone therapy can play in women’s health and what the potential side effects are.

    Research has also shown that testosterone can reduce vaginal dryness and similar menopausal symptoms when applied vaginally. Testosterone should be taken in doses appropriate for women, which can be difficult because in the United States, testosterone is only approved for use by men. Talk to your doctor if you are considering testosterone therapy.

    Estrogen to Treat Vaginal Dryness

    Estrogen replacement is the most commonly prescribed treatment method for menopausal symptoms, and it is also the treatment that has the highest success rates. However, it is important to talk to your doctor about estrogen therapy before you start it because estrogen replacement can increase a woman’s risk for some medical conditions and diseases.

    Estrogen replacement is also not just one product; different treatments are applied in different ways and carry different amounts of hormones. Different forms of estrogen therapy that are applied vaginally include a vaginal estrogen ring that releases extra estrogen for three months, estrogen tablets that are inserted into the vagina, and vaginal estrogen cream. Estrogen therapy can also be taken orally and in patch form to fight other menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes and mood swings.

    It’s important to talk to your doctor about your menopausal symptoms such as vaginal dryness so you can find a treatment that is best for you and your overall well-being. Estrogen replacement is a much more widespread treatment than testosterone therapy. There are also other treatments out there, such as herbal supplements and lifestyle changes.

    Medically reviewed by Brenda G., MD | Written by SheCares Editorial Team | Updated: Jun 18, 2020

    How to apply testosterone cream

    On the path to hormonal balance, learn all there is to know about testosterone gels and creams, including how, when, and why they are used in comparison to other methods.

    What are Testosterone Gels & Creams?

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Testosterone gels and creams are liquid applications used to supplement the amount of testosterone that the woman’s body should be creating.

    When Could Their Use Prove Beneficial?

    During premenopause, testosterone cream for women has been proven to improve well-being, mood, and sexual function in women with low libido caused by oral contraceptives. After menopause, topical testosterone is also prescribed for the same reasons. Its use pre- and postmenopause still proves controversial.

    Common Testosterone Gels & Creams for Women

    Common testosterone gels and creams used in women include AndroFeme®1, Testogel, Tostran (2%), Androgel, and Testim (1%). The latter two are approved for use in the U.S. for men and compounded for women at a weaker dosage.

    Benefits of Testosterone Gels & Creams

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Mainly, testosterone gels, creams, and even ointments are used for treatment of sexual desire disorder in addition to being used alongside oral contraceptives, which decrease levels of free testosterone in women.

    Symptoms of androgen deficiency include the following, which can be relieved with the supplementation of testosterone gels and creams:

    • Lack of motivation
    • Loss of libido
    • Lethargy
    • Depressed moods
    • Loss of muscle mass and strength
    • Lack of arousal
    • Insomnia
    • Headaches
    • Vasomotor symptoms
    • Anxiety
    • Lowered sexual enjoyment
    • Reduction in fantasies
    • And many more

    How and When to Use Them

    How to apply testosterone cream

    How Do I Apply Topical Testosterone?

    Testosterone gels and creams are applied directly to any clean, dry surface of the skin. The most common application sites are the thigh, arm, abdomen, clitoris, or labia.

    Also, keep the following tips for safe use in mind. Do not allow the testosterone to come in contact with anyone else, and wash hands immediately after application. Furthermore, do not wash the area where it was administered until at least three hours later.

    When Do I Use Topical Testosterone?

    No matter the age, when using to improve sexual desire, an appropriate dosage of compounded 1 percent testosterone gel, cream, or ointment is 0.5 grams daily. This delivers 5 mg of testosterone per day, which is one tenth of the generally prescribed dosage for men.

    In general, topical testosterone is considered off-label use for women as it is hard to regulate the amount of testosterone delivered. Recommendations are to monitor blood levels after the first three weeks and then every six months.

    Testosterone Gels & Creams Side Effects

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Under the direction of a doctor during treatment, applying small dosages for short-term use of topical testosterone should not cause adverse effects as long as it is balanced accordingly with estrogen and progesterone.

    However, a more common side effect that some women complain of concerns genital application. Genital application, even though it increased sensitivity in tissues, can lead to local irritation. Moreover, the application process can be messy and cause menstrual irregularities or spotting.

    With extreme dosing, more serious side effects of testosterone gels and creams include those related to masculinization, including acne and female-patterned balding (less common) in addition to deepening of the voice and an enlarged clitoris (rare).

    It is important for women to keep a note of caution in mind. When applied to the arm, abdomen, or thigh, the concentration of testosterone in the gel or cream may transfer to a partner or child.

    When you need testosterone treatment—and when you don’t

    Most men have problems with erections from time to time. But some men have erectile dysfunction, or ED. This is when it is difficult to get or keep an erection that’s firm enough for sexual intercourse.

    If you have ED, you may think that testosterone treatment will help. Testosterone is a male sex hormone. After age 50, men’s levels of testosterone slowly go down and ED becomes more common. But unless you have other symptoms of low testosterone, you should think twice about the treatment. Here’s why:

    Testosterone treatment usually isn’t helpful for ED.

    Testosterone treatment has not been shown to improve erections in men with normal testosterone levels. And studies show that it does not help men with low testosterone levels if ED is their only symptom.

    ED usually has other causes.

    ED is almost always caused by low blood flow to the penis. This is a result of other conditions, such as hardening of the arteries, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. These conditions narrow the blood vessels and reduce blood flow to the penis. Low testosterone may affect the desire for sex, but it rarely causes ED.

    Testosterone replacement therapy has many risks.

    Testosterone treatment can cause the body to retain too much fluid. It can also cause acne, an enlarged prostate, and enlarged breasts. Other side effects include lower fertility; an increase in red blood cells; and an increase in sleep apnea symptoms.

    Women and children should avoid touching unwashed or unclothed areas of skin where a man has applied testosterone gel. The gel can be transferred through skin contact.

    Although available data is conflicting, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has concluded that increased cardiovascular risk (problems with the heart and blood vessels) associated with testosterone use is a possibility. The AUA recommends that only FDA-approved medications should be used and a physical evaluation and follow up are important.

    Testosterone replacement therapy can be costly.

    Testosterone treatment can be an injection, a gel, or a patch that is put on the skin. All of these are costly. They may cost hundreds of dollars a month, depending on the treatment.

    Men who use a testosterone treatment must use it indefinitely to get and keep the full effect.

    When should you consider testosterone treatment for ED?

    If you’ve had trouble having erections for three months, talk to your doctor. He or she will ask about all your symptoms and give you a physical exam. Symptoms of low testosterone can include less of a sex drive, loss of body hair, breast growth, needing to shave less often, a drop in muscle size and strength, and bones that break more easily.

    If you have some of these symptoms, your doctor may have you get a blood test to measure your testosterone levels. The blood test should be done more than once. It is best to do it in the morning when testosterone levels are highest.

    If the tests show that you have low testosterone levels, your doctor should look for possible causes. For example, the low levels might be caused by a problem in the pituitary glands.

    If no other cause is found, you can try testosterone treatment.

    This report is for you to use when talking with your health-care provider. It is not a substitute for medical advice and treatment. Use of this report is at your own risk.

    © 2018 ABIM Foundation. Developed in cooperation with the American Urological Association.

    During the onset of puberty and throughout your twenties you are in your prime. Your testosterone levels are high and you find it easier to build muscle and keep body fat at bay.

    But after your twenties your T levels naturally start to taper off – in fact after thirty your androgen levels fall by about 1% per year.

    There are many ways that you can combat this – weight training, a nutrient-rich diet and a good T booster can do wonders for your male hormone levels for example.

    Some men though choose to use topical treatments such as transdermal gels or creams to improve their testosterone levels. But these interventions sometimes come at a cost.

    In this article we’ll take a look at the more common side effects of testosterone cream. Read on to find out why this might not be the treatment for you.

    What is Testosterone Cream?

    Testosterone is the primary male androgen hormone produced naturally by the Leydig cells of the testes. Normal levels vary but typically fall between 300-1000 ng.dL.

    However, if levels fall below 300 ng.dL you will start to experience side effects such as loss of strength and muscle mass, increase in belly fat and a loss of libido. Clinically this is referred to as hypogonadism.

    According to recent research, the number of men suffering from hypogonadism is on the increase, with 12% of men under 49 and 25% of men in their seventies suffering from low T [1].

    It is therefore important for you to do everything you can to keep your levels with the normal physiological range. This is where testosterone treatments come in.

    Approved in 2000 by the FDA, testosterone cream was designed to combat the effects of hypogonadism by providing the body with exogenous T. They account for around 65% of all T treatment prescriptions.

    It is simply a cream that contains testosterone. You rub it into your skin as a way of allowing it to enter the bloodstream.

    How to apply testosterone cream

    How Does Testosterone Cream Work?

    Applied topically, these treatments are absorbed through the skin layers over a period of time. Once it comes into contact with the outer layer of skin it diffuses through each tissue layer until it reaches the bloodstream.

    It usually prescribed to be used once a day in order to maintain an even release of T which helps to maintain normal hormone levels.

    It is said that the transdermal delivery of this type of treatment works best if you administer it over more densely muscled areas so that there are more capillaries available to absorb it and move it into the bloodstream.

    Even then, only around 10% of the topical cream penetrates the skin and is absorbed. The highest concentrations of transdermal treatments still only range from 15-20% penetration [2].

    The reason why many men opt for topical T treatments is that they can then avoid the injections associated with more invasive testosterone replacement therapies (TRT).

    But although easy to administer, testosterone creams might not be without their side effects. Here’s everything you need to know…

    How to apply testosterone cream

    What Are The Side Effects of Topical Testosterone Treatments?

    There are a number of side effects that transdermal treatments might cause. Here are just some of them.

    #1. Causes Skin Issues

    The most common complaint for those who use transdermal treatments is skin complaint. This may involve rashes or dry skin, or more severe symptoms of burning, blistering or swelling.

    Around one third of all testosterone cream users will develop skin complaints and between 10-15% of patients stop using the treatments altogether for this reason [3]

    #2. Transfering From Skin to Skin

    As topical treatments sit on your skin for long periods of time it is easy for them to wipe off onto other people you come into contact with. This may be particularly evident with your partner or children who you’ll probably hug on a daily basis.

    Between 2000 and 2009 there have been 20 reports of adverse effects in children via the FDA’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). This included children between 9 months and 7 years.

    For these children, symptoms of adverse effects included premature development of puberty, enlarged sexual organs and aggressive behaviour.

    #3. Gynecomastia

    Another side effect of testosterone cream is the development of feminine traits. Breast-like tissue, referred to as gynecomastia may occur for example.

    This can lead to an increase in breast tissue that is sore, painful and tender to touch.

    Although rare in comparison to skin complaints, ‘man boobs’ is caused by an increase in estrogen in the body. Although you might think that an increase in female hormone levels seems strange with transdermal T, testosterone can be converted into estrogen via a process called aromatization. More T this way means more potential estrogen.

    Feminization is also thought to occur due to inhibition of gonadotropin secretion as well as the conversion of androgens to estrogen. Either way, it’s an unwanted side effect.

    #4. A Drop in Libido

    Testosterone cream can either enhance or decrease your sexual appetite. It is a big regulator of libido, so any changes in serum levels will have an effect one way or the other.

    In some case reports patients have reported a loss in desire, sexual performance and interest. A lack of erection or inability to maintain an erection may coincide with these side effects too.

    #5. Enlarged Prostate

    Prolonged exposure to testosterone cream can result in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) – an enlarged prostate.

    More likely to occur in older patients, clinical trials show a modest trend towards an enlarged prostate which can increase the risk of urinary issues, bladder obstruction and kidney insufficiency.

    In rare cases, testosterone cream may also cause acute epididymitis – pain and swelling of testicular tissue. If this occurs, withdrawal from transdermal treatment should occur and be re-evaluated as an appropriate intervention.

    Are There Other Effective Methods of Boosting T Levels?

    Natural testosterone boosters contain nutrients that are specifically designed to enhance your male hormone levels without the side effects of TRT.

    Many men are ditching trandermal testosterone cream in favor of T boosting supplements. This is because there are no side effects and they don’t require medical supervision or prescriptions.

    TestoFuel is a state-of-the-art testosterone boosting supplement made from the highest quality nutrients around. Exhaustively researched to help you build muscle and strength, TestoFuel is the most accelerated supplement you’ll find.

    FDA Orders ‘Black Box’ Warning for AndroGel 1% and Testim 1% After Reports of Kids Affected by Adults’ Use

    May 7, 2009 — The FDA today warned about the risks that testosterone gel products can pose to children inadvertently exposed to those products by adults.

    The FDA is ordering a “black box” warning, the FDA’s sternest warning, for two prescription topical testosterone gel products, AndroGel 1% and Testim 1%.

    The FDA is requiring the boxed warning after getting reports of at least 20 children exposed to testosterone through contact with an adult using AndroGel 1% or Testim 1%.

    Those children’s adverse events included inappropriate enlargement of the genitalia (penis or clitoris), premature development of pubic hair, advanced bone age, increased libido, and aggressive behavior.

    In most cases, the signs and symptoms regressed when the child was no longer exposed to the product. But in a few cases, enlarged genitalia did not fully return to age-appropriate size and bone age remained modestly greater than the child’s chronological age.

    In some cases, children had to undergo invasive diagnostic procedures and, in at least one case, a child was hospitalized and underwent surgery because of a delay in recognizing the underlying cause of the signs and symptoms.

    The FDA is also concerned about unapproved testosterone products, including those sold online. Those products carry the same risk to children. But because they’re not supposed to be on the market in the first place, they can’t get a black box warning.

    About AndroGel 1% and Testim 1%

    These prescription testosterone gels are approved by the FDA for use in men who either no longer produce testosterone or produce it in very low amounts. Both products are applied once daily to the shoulders or upper arms. Only AndroGel 1% is approved for application to the abdomen.

    The FDA hasn’t approved any testosterone gel products for use by women. But of the 1.4 million U.S. prescriptions filled in 2007 for AndroGel, about 25,000 were dispensed to women, the FDA notes.

    AndroGel 1% and Testim 1% already have precautions on their labels about proper use of the products, such as where to apply it and covering the skin and washing hands afterward.

    But in most of the cases in which children were affected, adults didn’t use the gels correctly.

    In some cases, adults forgot to wash their hands, or to cover the exposed area of their skin, or they applied the gel to their chest (which isn’t an approved area for use), and then picked up or held infants or kids, FDA officials said in a news conference today.

    The new boxed warning will provide additional information about the risk of secondary exposure (exposing someone other than the patient using the gel) and the steps that should be taken to reduce that risk.

    AndroGel 1% is made by Solvay Pharmaceuticals, which pledges to work with the FDA regarding the black box warning, notes Neil Hirsch, a spokesman for Solvay Pharmaceuticals, in an email to WebMD.

    A spokesperson for Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, which makes Testim 1%, was not immediately available for comment.

    Safety Precautions

    The FDA recommends taking the following precautions to minimize the potential for secondary exposure to AndroGel 1% or Testim 1%:

    • Adults who use testosterone gels should wash their hands with soap and warm water after every application.
    • Adults should cover the application site with clothing once the gel has dried.
    • Adults should wash the application site thoroughly with soap and warm water prior to any situation where skin-to-skin contact with another person is anticipated.
    • Children and women should avoid contact with testosterone application sites on the skin of men who use these products.
    • Avoid any similar, but unapproved, products from the marketplace (including the Internet).

    If a child develops inappropriate male sex characteristics or is exposed to testosterone gel, the FDA recommends contacting the child’s doctor.

    Show Sources

    Email from Neil Hirsch, spokesman, Solvay Pharmaceuticals.

    Is it true that women can apply testosterone cream to their vaginal area to increase sex drive?

    While some studies suggest that testosterone cream might increase sex drive in women, it is not FDA-approved and it may not work for all women. The risks and side effects can be significant and unpleasant, so women experiencing low sex drive may want to consider alternative, less-risky treatments instead of topical hormone therapies.

    For many women, their low sex drive is a tough nut to crack. It is important to note that a low sex drive is a complex issue —affected by physical, psychological, social, and/or hormonal causes. Women may experience challenges during any of the stages of sexual response, including sexual desire and arousal. These issues can occur in all women at any stage in life, although they occur more frequently around hormonal events (such as after having a child or during menopause) or after an illness. Common experiences include:

    • Little or no desire to have sex
    • Inability to maintain arousal
    • Pain during sex
    • Inability to orgasm

    There are medical and non-medical treatments that may increase sex drive:

    Non-Medical Treatment Options:

    • Improving communication with your partner. Do you talk about sex with your partner? Do you feel comfortable addressing this issue? Can you express your feelings and desires in an open and honest way?В
    • Strengthening your pelvic muscles. These muscles are used during sexual intercourse and, just like you do crunches if you want to tone your abs, they need to be targeted with specific exercises as well. Pelvic muscle exercises are called Kegel exercises.
    • Thinking about your lifestyle and possibly considering some changes. Are you drinking a lot of alcohol? Do you smoke? Are you getting enough exercise? Making changes to lead a healthier lifestyle will not only benefit your overall health, but can also (bonus!) improve your sex life.
    • Talking with a counselor or therapist. There may be other issues in your life that are affecting your sexual desire. A trained professional can help you figure out if there are steps you may take to address these issues.

    Medical Treatment Options:

    If you are considering medical treatment, you should think about discussing your symptoms with a health care provider. Female sexual dysfunction may be the result of other medical conditions, so your doctor may develop a treatment plan to address those issues. Other treatments include:

    • Estrogen therapy. Estrogen is a hormone that plays a part in vaginal health. Low levels of estrogen can affect female sex drive. Estrogen therapy may involve creams, gels, or tablets. It is usually given to women to cope with menopause symptoms.
    • Progestin therapy. Progestin is another hormone that works in conjunction with estrogen. Research on progestin as a treatment for sexual dysfunction is mixed and it is not usually prescribed to treat sexual dysfunction.
    • Androgen therapy. Androgens are male hormones, including testosterone. Although both men and women have testosterone, the normal level in women is much lower than that in men. Studies using androgen therapy to treat sexual dysfunction in women have not been conclusive, and androgen therapy is not FDA-approved for treating female sexual dysfunction.

    Testosterone therapy for low sex drive in women, though not FDA-approved, may still be available through a health care provider and can be given as a cream, patch, gel or injection. Because testosterone is a male hormone found in small levels in women, when extra testosterone is administered to women, some of the side effects can be unpleasant. These include:

    • Excess body hair (See Sudden hair growth? and Help – I am a woman with a hairy chest! formore information)
    • Acne
    • Enlargement of the clitoris
    • Mood changes, including aggressiveness and hostility

    The risks of using testosterone cream can be high and there is no guarantee that it will increase sex drive in women. Female sexual dysfunction is an issue that is complicated and can involve many different aspects other than hormone levels. For women who are struggling with low sex drive, it may help to think about possible underlying causes and how these can be addressed before resorting to hormonal therapies.

    Terry Graedon

    Most people associate menopause with hot flashes. Fair enough, but millions of women going through this change of life complain of a drop in sex drive. Is there any way to restore libido after menopause? One woman found that testosterone cream worked wonders.

    Testosterone Cream to Restore Libido:

    Q. I had a total hysterectomy 21 years ago. Needless to say, my libido was adversely affected. A year ago, I found a wonderful doctor who prescribed estrogen, progesterone and transdermal testosterone. What a remarkable difference! My desire returned in a big way.

    The downside is that my husband isn’t as supercharged as I am. As a result, I’ve cut back on the number of times per week that I apply the testosterone cream. I have not noticed any serious side effects from using testosterone. If I use too much, I might get a small pimple on my face. Why isn’t this treatment more widely used?

    The Story on Testosterone Cream:

    A. You are right that testosterone can be helpful for reduced sexual desire. While many people think of it as a “male” hormone, women also make this hormone and it has an impact on sexual functioning in women as well as men. A recent review concluded “placebo-controlled trials show an improvement in sexual function with low-dose testosterone therapy in select postmenopausal women with HSDD” [hypoactive sexual desire disorder, aka low libido] (Journal of Women’s Health, online Nov. 5, 2019). The authors point out, however, that most studies are fairly short term and don’t tell whether testosterone supplementation would make women more susceptible to heart disease or breast cancer.

    The Pros and Cons of Testosterone:

    You asked why more doctors don’t prescribe this treatment. One explanation may be that the FDA has not approved oral or topical testosterone for women. Although doctors can prescribe medications “off label,” many prefer not to do so. They may worry about possible side effects.

    In addition, some scientists point out that testosterone cream is most effective in combination with estrogen (Hormones and Behavior, Feb. 2016). As you described, this is the regimen your doctor prescribed.

    A different review of placebo-controlled trials found evidence that “ testosterone therapy improves sexual function in postmenopausal women” (Clinical Endocrinology, March 2019). However, no one knows if testosterone cream or pills are safe for women over the long term.

    Endocrinologists around the world have endorsed the use of testosterone therapy for postmenopausal women only at doses that resemble normal testosterone levels in premenopausal women (Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Oct. 1, 2019). At “doses that approximate physiological testosterone concentrations for premenopausal women,” postmenopausal women might experience acne or even some facial hair growth. These experts think that other side effects such as baldness, deepening of the voice or clitoral enlargement are unlikely at these doses.

    Testosterone cream is simply a transdermal application of the testosterone hormone you rub directly on your skin just as you would any type of lotion. The hormone in a testosterone cream is the same as any other testosterone based medication; as you already know testosterone is simply testosterone. The difference between a testosterone cream and say an injectable solution is the delivery of the hormone, the absorption rate and efficiency of the product but the active hormone remains the same. As you are aware there are many forms of applicable testosterone but when it comes to testosterone cream there are generally only two of worthy note; AndroGel and “The Cream” with many generic AndroGel’s being available.

    The Common Testosterone Cream:

    Of any testosterone cream you may find AndroGel is without question the most common and one of the most commonly prescribed testosterones in the treatment of low testosterone. One reason it is so popular is the ease of its use; simply rub the gel like testosterone cream on your upper arms or shoulders and let it absorb into the skin; it doesn’t get any more basic than that. Another reason it is so popular is due to its very low potent nature; doses of AndroGel are often ten to even twenty times the amount of injectable testosterone because the gel like testosterone cream only has an absorption rating of about 10% meaning most of the active hormone never makes it into the body. Many physicians prefer this method due to a misplaced fear of the hormone. While AndroGel has a place in medicine, for the average man who suffers from low testosterone this is not a method we strongly recommend as it is largely inefficient.

    Performance Testosterone Cream:

    How to apply testosterone cream

    “The Cream” was a testosterone cream made by the late Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative (BALCO) that in many ways is very similar to every other testosterone cream on earth in-terms of application and the hormone within. The difference between “The Cream” and say AndroGel is that “The Cream” was made in an effort to beat drug testing for tested athletes thereby allowing them to increase testosterone levels without raising suspicion and guess what, it worked very well. This testosterone cream was a mixture of testosterone and epitestosterone thereby allowing the athlete to increase both testosterone and epitestosterone levels at the same time. This is important because steroid testing often measures the levels of the two hormones and it is when testosterone levels go far beyond epitestosterone levels that red flags are raised. By maintaining equal or at least close to equal parts the athlete could increase his levels with this potent testosterone cream without raising suspicion.

    Efficiency and Effectiveness:

    As eluded to above a testosterone cream can be useful in increasing levels in men who suffer from low testosterone but in many cases it is not strong enough; truth be told in many cases they simply aren’t prescribed enough. While it has been proven the absorption rate of a testosterone cream is only about 10% this is something many doctors refuse to acknowledge. In the end most men are far better served asking for injectable testosterone or testosterone implant pellets such as Testopel to treat their condition.

    For the performance enhancer we can have a bit of a different story; obviously the performance enhancer will not be bound by a specific dose and can apply much more of the testosterone cream if he desires. Even so, the athlete should not expect massive buildups in lean tissue and strength but more of a boosting effect. Testosterone cream can be very useful for a tested athlete looking for an added advantage; whether this is fair or not is a discussion for another day. For the gym rat or individual looking for a bodybuilding type physique testosterone cream truly has no useful place.

    Safety:

    A testosterone cream can cause the same side-effects as any other testosterone form including injectable testosterone such as water retention, Gynecomastia, high blood pressure and cholesterol issues. However, as nearly all who use testosterone cream will do so for the purpose of therapeutic measure doses will be so low the probability of such side-effects is very low. There is one side-effect of testosterone cream that is however unique unto its own and that is irritation of the skin at the applied area in the form of a rash or burn. For this reason many men find the creams to be uncomfortable. We must note at this time if it sounds like we’re giving testosterone cream a hard time while that may be true we’re simply telling it like it is and while this can be a fair product for some men by and large there are simply many far superior products available in-terms of safety and effectiveness.

    Bodybuilders commonly use a topical testosterone gel called AndroGel to send their muscular development, testosterone levels and sexual performance soaring. Unfortunately, AndroGel requires a prescription, meaning some athletes might need an equally effective alternative.

    How to apply testosterone creamWhen it comes to building lean muscle mass and giving your sexual performance a major boost, there’s no greater hormone than testosterone. Unfortunately, it’s often difficult to find a reliable way of delivering testosterone to your body. Injectable methods are illegal in many countries, and even if you can get a hold of injectable testosterone, you could be buying dangerous, counterfeit products. As for oral steroids, these can be toxic to your liver, and little of the testosterone is actually delivered to your muscles. So where does this leave us? Well, there’s an increasing movement towards testosterone gels – particularly AndroGel.

    What is AndroGel?

    Not everybody has the good fortune of producing abundant amounts of testosterone and performing like a god in bed. So these people are often prescribed testosterone gel such as the manufactured AndroGel to treat the problem. In regards to the AndroGel effects, people can replace their normally-low testosterone levels with a massive infusion of this hormone – thus increasing both sex drive and muscle-building capabilities.

    How to apply AndroGel

    How to apply testosterone creamThis is a topical testosterone gel that comes in either a packet or bottle with a pump. No matter what type of packaging your AndroGel comes in, you’ll find that it’s a very easy product to use. Assuming you’re using the bottle with a pump, you simply pump once (like lotion bottles) and a measured amount of testosterone will be released. Once you’ve gotten the desired amount of AndroGel on your hands, you can rub it anywhere on your abdomen, upper arms or shoulders (which we recommend for best results). After applying the gel, you should stay away from water for 5-6 hours so that it doesn’t wash off.

    Drawbacks to AndroGel

    The biggest problem with this product is that you can’t exactly buy AndroGel online. Furthermore, it’s not easy to get a prescription for this testosterone gel if your levels are perfectly fine. Another concern here involves AndroGel side effects, which aren’t as bad as oral or injectable forms of testosterone; however, novice users may still experience some mild effects in the beginning. Finally, AndroGel takes its sweet time absorbing into the skin, and you could be waiting up to 6 hours before being able to shower or go swimming.

    Alternatives to AndroGel

    How to apply testosterone creamIf you can’t get a prescription for AndroGel, one of the better alternatives on the market is N2Transoderm. This product provides the same effects as AndroGel – increased sexual performance, enhanced strength during workouts, faster recovery times – yet you can buy N2Transoderm online without a prescription. Going further, you can expect a 2-3 lb. fat loss coupled with a 2-3 lb. gain in lean muscle mass in just 4-6 weeks. We should also mention that N2Transoderm is applied topically just like AndroGel, which means it’s very convenient to use.

    In any case, you can experience big-time muscle gains and greatly improve your performance in bed by using either N2Transoderm or AndroGel. Here\’s a few articles where you can read more:

    You can get N2Transoderm testosterone gel at N2BM Nutrition LLC. Just use these links.

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    Testosterone Cream

    Has anyone used any kind of testosterone cream? Does it work?

    are you talking about like Andro-gel and stuff like that?

    no nothing like andro. just regular testosterone cream or gell.

    Dude that **** is junk. Testosterone is a controlled substance requiring a doctor’s prescription.

    It’s not actual Test. It’s just a type of Test Booster.

    how exactly does it boost test?

    I cant get to the site cause I’m at work right now but what does the site say?

    description says it contains prohormones in a gel form.

    I’m going to do a little research on it right now.

    First thing I found was that it is used as a sexual thing for women to rub on their clitoris.

    Conditions and Treatments:
    AIDS / HIV
    Allergies
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    Cardiac Disease
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    Depression
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    Infections
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    Liver Disease
    Migraines
    Respiratory
    Problems
    Sexually Transmitted Diseases
    Urological Conditions

    This told me to search for AndroGel.

    AndroGel (1%) is actually Testosterone Gel.

    Brand name:
    AndroGel
    Pronounced: AN-droe-jel
    Generic name: Testosterone gel
    Other brand name: Testim

    Why is this drug prescribed?

    AndroGel is a hormone replacement product for men suffering from hypogonadism, a low level of the male hormone testosterone. This condition is marked by symptoms such as impotence and decreased interest in sex, lowered mood, fatigue, and decreases in bone density and lean body mass. Testosterone replacement therapy helps correct these problems. AndroGel, applied daily to the skin, provides an especially convenient way of taking the hormone, which was previously administered only by injection or skin patch.

    Most important fact about this drug

    Men using AndroGel must be careful to prevent contact between gel-covered areas and other people’s skin. The drug can be transferred by skin-to-skin contact and can have harmful effects on women, especially pregnant women and their unborn babies. Women who touch AndroGel should wash with soap and water as soon as possible. Female partners of men who use AndroGel should contact a physician if they develop signs that the hormone is being transferred, such as acne, increased body hair, or other male sexual characteristics.

    How should you take this medication?

    Apply AndroGel once daily in the morning to clean, dry skin. Empty the entire contents of the package into a clean hand and apply to the shoulders and upper arms and/or the abdomen. Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water. Allow the application site to dry before dressing, then be sure to cover the treated area with clothing. Avoid bathing, showering, or swimming for 5 to 6 hours after application. Do not apply AndroGel to the genitals.

    –If you miss a dose.

    Apply it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next application, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular schedule.

    Store at room temperature.

    What side effects may occur?

    Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue using topical AndroGel.

    More common side effects may include:
    Acne, application site reaction, breast enlargement, emotional instability, headache, high blood pressure, prostate disorder

    Less common side effects may include:
    Breast pain, decreased sexual desire, depression, difficult urination, disorder of taste or smell, hair loss, hot flashes, insomnia, nervousness, male reproductive gland disorder, swelling of the hands, ankles, or feet, teary eyes, weakness

    Why should this drug not be prescribed?

    Women must not use AndroGel, and men with prostate cancer or cancer of the breast should also avoid it. Do not use the product if it gives you an allergic reaction.

    Special warnings about this medication

    Before using AndroGel, you should be aware that prolonged, high-dose therapy with male hormones is associated with liver disease and in some cases, liver cancer. Breast enlargement is also a common problem.

    Remember, too, that older men who take male hormones are at higher risk for developing prostate disease or prostate cancer. Your doctor should check you carefully before prescribing AndroGel if you have a medical profile that increases your risk for prostate cancer.

    Testosterone replacement therapy also tends to worsen sleep apnea, a condition that causes breathing to stop temporarily during sleep. Obese men and those with chronic lung disease are especially at risk.

    If you have a history of heart, kidney, or liver disease and develop swelling in the hands, feet, or ankles, stop using AndroGel and alert your doctor immediately. Also contact your doctor if you develop too frequent or persistent erections, nausea, vomiting, or changes in breathing or skin color.

    This drug has not been tested in males under 18 years of age.

    Possible food and drug interactions when taking this medication

    Combining AndroGel with adrenocorticotropic hormone (Cortrosyn), or steroid drugs such as hydrocortisone (Hytone), prednisolone (Pediapred), and betamethasone (Diprolene) may increase fluid retention and swelling, especially in people with heart or kidney disease.

    If AndroGel is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining AndroGel with the following:

    Oxyphenbutazone
    Insulin (Humulin, Novolin)
    Propranolol (Inderal)

    Special information if you are pregnant or breastfeeding

    Maternal contact with AndroGel can harm a developing baby. The product must be avoided by pregnant and breastfeeding women. If you are exposed to AndroGel while pregnant, notify your doctor immediately.

    Recommended dosage
    ADULTS

    The recommended adult male starting dose of AndroGel is one 5-gram packet (or for Testim, one 5-gram tube) applied once daily, which delivers 50 milligrams of testosterone. Your doctor should take a blood test to measure your testosterone level about 2 weeks after you start treatment, and may adjust the dose accordingly. The maximum recommended dose is 2 packets or tubes daily.

    One reported overdose of injectable testosterone is believed to have caused a stroke. If you suspect an overdose of AndroGel, seek medical attention immediately.

    How to apply testosterone cream

    Monique Rainford, MD, is board-certified in obstetrics-gynecology, and currently serves as an Assistant Clinical Professor at Yale Medicine. She is the former chief of obstetrics-gynecology at Yale Health.

    If you’ve been given a prescription for vaginal cream, it’s important that you apply it properly, so you can get the best therapeutic effects.

    Some types of vaginal cream are prescribed to treat an infection, and hormonal vaginal cream may be prescribed during certain times of your life, such as after menopause or during breastfeeding when low estrogen levels can cause vaginal dryness.

    Here are step-by-step instructions for vaginal cream application.

    How to apply testosterone cream

    When to Apply Vaginal Cream

    Using vaginal cream is easiest if it’s done before going to bed. This will help the medicine stay in place and prevent daytime discharges. If you need to apply it more than once a day, check the instructions for the timing of your applications.

    You may want to wear a panty liner if you are not going to be going to bed immediately after applying the cream. Do not use a tampon when you are using vaginal cream because it can absorb the drug.

    Consider setting reminders for yourself so you don’t forget to apply your vaginal cream. If you missed a dose, check the instructions to see what to do in case of a missed dose, and if this information isn’t provided with your prescription, call your pharmacist to ask.

    If you are using an antibiotic cream to treat bacterial vaginosis, use it exactly as prescribed and never stop early, even if your symptoms resolve. Incomplete treatment increases the risk of antibiotic resistance, making the infection harder to treat in the future.

    How to Apply Vaginal Cream

    To apply vaginal cream, you will need a towel. soap, and water.

    Prepare

    Find a comfortable place where you can lie down while applying the cream. Your bed can be an ideal option, though you may want to place a towel underneath you to prevent any cream from spilling on your linens.

    Steps

    1. Wash your hands with soap and water.
    2. Open the tube.
    3. Screw the applicator nozzle onto the tube until it is secure but not overly tight.
    4. Gently squeeze the tube from the bottom to push a sufficient amount of cream into the applicator barrel. Make sure it is enough to reach the prescribed dose. Most applicators provide markings to indicate where you should stop.
    5. Unscrew the applicator from the tube.
    6. Lie on your back with your knees drawn toward you.
    7. Gently insert the applicator deep into your vagina.
    8. Press the plunger down until it reaches its original position.
    9. Wash your hands with soap and water after applying the cream.

    Note, if you are pregnant, insert the applicator gently and don’t insert it past the point where you feel resistance.

    Cleaning the Applicator

    Reusable applicators should be cleaned by pulling the plunger to remove it from the barrel and washing it with mild soap and warm water. Wipe it dry and allow it to air dry while disassembled. You can assemble it to store away once it is dry, such as in the morning if you are using it before bedtime.

    Never boil your reusable applicator or use extremely hot water, as this can cause the plastic to melt or deteriorate.

    If you are using vaginal cream to treat an infection, you should discard the applicator once you have finished your course of treatment. The used applicator could transfer yeast, bacteria, and other microorganisms if you were to reuse it in the future.

    Never share a vaginal applicator with others, even if it has been thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. Doing so risks the inadvertent transmission of bacteria and other organisms from one person to the other.

    Storage and Expiration

    Most vaginal creams should be stored at room temperature. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about storing your vaginal cream.

    Many prescription creams are intended for one use only and are not meant to be saved. Check with your healthcare provider if unsure.

    If using a vaginal cream saved from before, check the expiration date. Dispose of it if it has expired.

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    Cernos Gel (Testogel)

    Testoheal Gel (Testogel)

    Testosterone Gel is a gel steroid commonly prescribed to boost testosterone levels in men. Unlike other synthetic drugs often ingested or administered intravenously, Testosterone Gel is applied directly to the skin, soaking into the muscles and bloodstream. Using the testosterone product in gel form to gain muscle mass for bodybuilding purposes is possible.

    How To Administer Testosterone Gel

    It is best to apply Testosterone Gel in the morning to allow the body to absorb the gel as the day progresses. This will also enable the gel to seep slowly into the bloodstream. In order for the gel to work properly, pores must be clean; therefore, it is best to apply following a shower. Make sure to use the entire contents of the single pouch as directed and allow the gel to dry for at least five minutes before getting dressed.

    What Are The Effects of The Gel?

    Increase the intensity of your training sessions at the gym. As Testosterone Gel begins to work, typically during a one- to two-week period, it will gradually increase energy levels and motivate you to use heavier weights during workouts, pushing muscle tissue to its limits. The testosterone agents in the Testosterone Gel will work to quickly repair the tissue, allowing for rapid muscle growth. Other benefits included a better sleep pattern and better immune system.

    Testosterone Gel Used In A Cycle

    The gel can be used during mass building or bulking cycles when extra calories are consumed for maximum muscle growth. Testosterone Gels come in 2.5g or 5g sachets. Each time the user applies one sachet, the amount of testosterone they get ranges from 25 to 50mg. No matter what size sachet you get, the gel solution has an absorption rate of only 10%. Doses as high as 20-30g per day are required to see any results in a performance setting. Testosterone Gel is more commonly used to treat low testosterone levels in patients.

    You can also use Testosterone Gel with other steroids, like Testosterone Cypionate, Masteron, Winstrol and other injectable and oral steroids available for sale at our anabolic steroids online shop.