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How to apply a butterfly bandage

‌Butterfly stitches, also known as “Steri-Strips”, are adhesive bandages used to close small, shallow wounds. Butterfly stitches are an alternative to traditional needle and thread sutures, which are useful in cases that a wound is large, uneven, or bleeding heavily. Some traditional bandages have trouble sticking to parts of the body that move a lot or are moist or hairy. The butterfly stitch is a good alternative for areas of the body that are more difficult to bandage.

How to Assess a Wound

When using butterfly stitches, you first want to determine if the wound is suitable for this type of bandage. Take into consideration when assessing the wound that:

  • The size of the wound should be less than 1/2 inch long and not very deep.
  • You should stop the wound from bleeding before applying butterfly stitches. Apply pressure using a clean cloth and go to a medical center if the wound bleeds for more than 5 minutes.
  • Butterfly stitches are designed to hold together straight edge wounds. If your wound is jagged, use an alternative bandage.

How to Apply Butterfly Stitches

Step 1. Wash your hands and clean the wound with cool water. Make sure to remove any dirt or debris from the wound. Then clean the skin around the wound with soap and water.

Step 2. Apply the butterfly stitches by holding the two sides of the wound together. Don’t apply the butterfly stitch lengthwise, and make sure the middle of the bandage goes across the wound. Place the butterfly stitches about 1/8 of an inch apart, and use as many as needed.

Step 3. This step is optional, but you may hold the butterfly stitches in place by adding additional bandages over the ends of the butterfly stitches. This will provide extra security.

How Long to Keep the Butterfly Stitches On

With proper care and maintenance, the butterfly stitches should stay in place for up to 12 days. During the first 48 hours, you must keep the stitches and wound dry. After 48 hours, the wound should be stable enough for you to shower. After washing, make sure to gently pat the area to remove all of the water. If the stitches become loose, don’t pull on them. You could reopen the wound by pulling on the stitches, so instead use scissors to trim the bandage edges.‌

Make sure to observe the wound each day. Contact your medical professional if you notice:

  • Redness around the wound
  • Pus leaking from the wound.
  • The area around the wound becomes hot and more painful.
  • The wound swells or swelling doesn’t go down.

Proper Removal of Butterfly Stitches

After 12 days, the butterfly stitches can be safely removed. To prevent the risk of reopening the wound, don’t pull the stitches off. Instead, use a solution of 1/2 hydrogen peroxide and 1/2 water to soak the stitches. This solution will loosen the adhesive and make it easy to gently lift the stitches off.

If a medical professional applied the butterfly stitches, they should provide you with information about when to remove them. You might be instructed to wait for the butterfly stitches to fall off on their own.

Wrap Up

You should always contact your doctor with any medical concerns you have. Seek immediate medical help if:

  • The wound was caused by something rusty, as you may need a tetanus shot.
  • The wound is very large and/or deep.
  • The wound was caused by an animal.
  • You lose feeling or movement in the limb.
  • Bleeding doesn’t stop after 5 to 10 minutes of applying pressure.

Butterfly stitches are a great alternative to traditional sutures and can be applied at home. Make sure to keep the wound clean and dry.

Show Sources

NHS: “How do I apply plasters and other dressings?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Incision Care.”

University of North Carolina Wilmington Abrons Student Health Center: “Instruction sheet: Steri-Strips.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Lacerations (Cuts) Without Stitches in Children.”

Robert, J and Hedges, J. Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine 5th edition, Saunders, 2010.

Brown Health Services Patient Education Series: “Suture and Steri-Strip Care Instructions.”

The bandage is a piece of material used for the support or to restrict the movement of the body parts. There are different types of bandage used for the patient depending on the type of wound or injuries. Butterfly bandage is a type of bandage which is also known as butterfly strip tape or butterfly stitch bandage. It is used for a clean wound of less than 2-inch.

If there is longer wound, cut or injury then we can use more than one butterfly bandage. let’s know more about how to make it and how to apply and care it too.

When to use a butterfly bandage?

Before you know how to make a butterfly bandage, you should know if you really need it. So when to use a butterfly bandage? You can use butterfly stitches tape in the following case:

  • Butterfly bandage use is to seal a cut that is relatively small but deep wound.
  • Butterfly stitch bandage is used on a straight wound.
  • It is also used in the open wound.
  • These types of bandages are used to close the wound to promote the healing process and reduce the risk of scarring.
  • It works best on a cut having a size less than two inches in length. You can use more than one butterfly bandages if the cut is longer than two inches.
  • Butterfly stitch bandages are not used in a ball and socket type of joint like elbow joint, knee joint or shoulder joint. This is not used in the moveable joint because movement will pull on the cut and causes the wound to gape open.

How to make a butterfly bandage

Now that you know when to use a butterfly bandage, you should know how to make a butterfly bandage. You will need the following instrument to make a butterfly Stitcher:

  • Scissors
  • Adhesive tape

Procedure to make a butterfly bandage

  • Step 1: You need to cut the 1-inch long tape
  • Step 2: Take a piece of tape by hand so that the adhesive sides do not face each other.
  • Step 3: Cut a cadence triangle on one side of the tape, and then open the bottom path from the folded edge and cut the angle upwards, but not all the way between the folded edges.
  • Step 4: Chim on the other side. Cut a triangular line and repeat on the other side, it will cut you.
  • Step 5: Without tape. Loosen the tape so that it is facing up to the gummy side. (The tape should have a crescent shape in the center.)
  • Step 6: Drain center flap. The center flaps should be glued to the center of the tape so that it is on the adhesive side so they overlap. This prevents it from sticking directly to the top of the wound.
  • Step 7: Apply a bandage. By sticking one end of the tape to one side of the wound, the butterfly’s bandage gently grips the edges of the wound, pulling the wound horizontally and sticking to the other end. (The narrow center of the tape should be placed along the edges of the wound).
  • Step 8: If the wound is long, apply several bandages and apply several butterfly bandages along its length as needed.

How to apply butterfly bandage

After making a butterfly stitches, you should apply it in the correct way. So how 5o apply a butterfly bandage?

1. Cleaning the wound

You should rinse the wound with the cool water. It is better to rinse the cut under the running water. Because the running water will help to flush foreign bodies or debris. You must avoid using antiseptics or hydrogen peroxide over the wound. These can actually cause irritation to the wound.

You must also wash the surrounding area of the wound with soap and water. Make sure the soapy water doesn’t run into the cut or injury. Then rinse the soapy water away with cool water and pat it dry with a clean cloth.

2. Putting a butterfly bandage on the wound

While applying a butterfly bandage on the wound you must follow these things:

  • Hold the wound shut with your fingers.
  • You should be using your dominant hand to line up the edges of the cut.
  • Now bring the edges of the cut together using your thumb and index finger.
  • Finally, keep pressing the cut to keep the wound closed.

Now you should set half of the bandage on the first side and pull it to the other side of the wound. Remove the backing of the butterfly bandages to reveal the adhesive. Press the first half of the butterfly bandage on a side of the cut. Now press the bandage by bringing another half of the cut.

Note: you should never apply a butterfly bandage lengthwise along with the cut or injury.

3. Securing the wound

For securing the wound you must apply one more butterfly strip tape above and below the cut. It is done in order to encourage the healing process of the wound.

Now put the second butterfly strip vertically across the bandages.

You must leave the butterfly bandaid until it falls off.

4. Assessing the wound

For assessing the wound you must follow these steps:

  • Apply pressure to stop the bleeding
  • Inspect the wound to see what type of injury it is
  • Determine how deep and long the cut is.
  • Avoid using a butterfly bandage on animal bites or joints.

How to remove butterfly bandage

Butterfly stitches or butterfly bandaid can be removed after 12 days. Follow these steps carefully to remove the butterfly stitches:

  • You need to wash your hands with soap and water. You should also clean your nails.
  • Start peeling each strip gently from one end, a tiny bit at a time.
  • While you pull the strip, take your other hand and place your thumb and forefinger on both sides of the cut to keep the skin stable.
  • Now pull the strip back horizontal to your skin until it reaches the cut point. If you pull the strip vertically, it may increase the tension of the skin. To avoid pulling the strip vertically.
  • Now you need to repeat the process on the other side too. You can take your time.
  • After completing, pinch both ends of the bandages with your fingers and lift it gently.

How to care for butterfly bandage

If you have used the butterfly bandaids in your cut or injury, you must follow this instruction while the wound is healing and before you remove the stitches:

  • The injured area should be kept clean.
  • The area should be kept dry for the first 48 hours.
  • After 48 hours, you can keep the area dry except showering or washing.
  • If the butterfly strip edges come loose, trim them with scissors. Pulling on them could reopen the cut.

When to call a doctor

You should call your doctor if:

  • The bleeding from the cut doesn’t get stopped.
  • If the cut becomes red, swollen, or more painful. These sign could be a sign of infections.

Take away

Butterfly strip tape or butterfly bandaid is used in the clean wound which is less than 2 inches. It is also used in longer wound cut or injury. It can be made by us using the instruments present in home-like scissors and adhesive tape. But if you can’t then you can get it from your nearby pharmacy shops.

You need to have a proper idea of the use of butterfly stitches and suture. Great care must be taken while the removal of the butterfly bandage.

How to apply a butterfly bandage

Butterfly bandages are adhesive bandages that can be used in place of sutures to close a laceration under some conditions. A laceration is a break in the skin caused by a sharp object or puncture of some kind. Butterfly bandages are easy to make and use.

Under normal conditions, treat a laceration at home only if it’s small, shallow, and the skin along the laceration matches up perfectly (and remains together when undisturbed). If possible, you should see the doctor for lacerations where:

  • The cut is gaping.
  • The edges can be pulled more than 1/8 inch apart with traction on nearby skin.
  • The cut is over a knuckle. the cut is on the face or genitals.
  • The cut might be contaminated with foreign material the cut was caused by human or animal teeth.
  • There is numbness, deep pain, or inability to move a part fully.

Butterfly bandages do not work well over moveable joints such as your knee, knuckle or elbow. These may require sutures because the movement of the joint will pull on the cut and cause it to gape. If you decide to treat a sharp laceration over a moving surface (such as knee, elbow, or knuckle), you need to provide protection against motion for the first few days.

If possible, deep lacerations need to be looked at by a doctor and probably sutured. Lacerations of the face that may cause disfigurement need to be looked at by a doctor and possible sutured.

How to make and apply a butterfly bandage

  • Cut off a piece of tape that is about 1 inch to 1 1/2 inches in length.
  • Fold the piece of tape in half so that the non-sticky sides are against one another.
  • Cut a small triangular notch on one side of the tape, beginning about a quarter of the way down from the folded edge and cut angling up toward—but not all the way to—the center of the folded edge.
  • Repeat on the other side, cutting a triangular notch that matches the one you just cut.
  • Unfold the tape so the sticky side is facing up.
  • The tape should look like it has a bow-tie shape in the middle.
  • Fold the center flaps across the middle of tape, sticky side in, so they overlap. This will prevent the adhesive from sitting directly on top of the wound.
  • Apply the bandage by sticking one end of the tape on one side of the wound, gently holding the edges of the wound together, pulling the tape across the wound, and sticking its other end in place.
  • The narrow middle of the tape should be positioned over the edges of the wound.
  • If the wound is long, make and apply as many butterfly bandages as needed along its length.

How to apply a butterfly bandage

How Long Should You Leave a Butterfly Bandage on a Cut?

If you’re treating the cut at home, leave the butterflies on until they peel off on their own. Keep the wound covered with a dry dressing and keep it clean. Avoid bumping the area. It can take as long as 10 and 14 days before the cut is healed

Watch for:
See the doctor if there is redness around the wound, red streaks, swelling, drainage, fever, tender bumps in the groin or armpit upsteam from the wound, or an unexplained increase in pain or tenderness.

Butterfly stitches, also known as Steri-Strips or butterfly bandages, are narrow adhesive bandages that are used instead of traditional stitches (sutures) to close small, shallow cuts.

These adhesive bandages aren’t a good choice if the cut is large or gaping, has ragged edges, or won’t stop bleeding.

They’re also not a good option if the cut is in a location where your skin moves a lot, such as a finger joint, or an area that’s moist or hairy. In these conditions, the bandages may have trouble sticking.

Keep reading to learn how to apply and remove butterfly stitches, and when to use them.

There are specific aspects of a wound that do or do not make it a good candidate for butterfly stitches. When considering whether to use butterfly stitches to close a wound, you’ll first want to:

  • Assess the edges. Butterfly stitches are effective for holding together the clean edges of shallow cuts. If you have a scrape or a cut with ragged edges, consider a larger bandage or a liquid bandage.
  • Assess the bleeding. Using a clean cloth, towel, or bandage, apply pressure for 5 minutes. If the cut continues to bleed, you should seek medical attention.
  • Assess the size. If the cut is too long or too deep, butterfly stitches aren’t the best treatment. Butterfly stitches shouldn’t be used for cuts longer than a 1/2 inch.

1. Clean the wound

The first step in wound care is cleaning the wound:

  1. Wash your hands.
  2. Use cool water to rinse your cut, flushing out dirt and debris.
  3. Gently clean the skin around the cut with soap and water and then dry the area. The butterfly stitches will stick better on clean, dry skin.

2. Close the wound

The next step is applying the butterfly stitches:

  1. Close the cut by holding its edges together.
  2. Position the butterfly stitch across the middle of the cut to hold the edges together, not lengthwise.
  3. Stick half the bandage on one side of the cut.
  4. Bring the other half over the cut, tight enough to hold the edges of skin together, and stick it to the other side of the cut.
  5. Place more butterfly stitches across the cut — alternating above and below the first strip about 1/8 of an inch apart — until you feel the edges of the cut are adequately held together.
  6. Consider putting a bandage on each side of the cut, running horizontally to the cut, over the ends of the butterfly stitches to help hold them in place.

If you have a cut that’s been closed with butterfly stitches, follow these care instructions while the wound is healing and before you remove the stitches:

  • Keep the area clean.
  • Keep the area dry for the first 48 hours.
  • After 48 hours, keep the area dry except for showering or washing.
  • If the butterfly stitch edges come loose, trim them with scissors. Pulling on them could reopen the cut.

According to the University of North Carolina, if the butterfly stitches are still in place after 12 days, they can be removed.

Don’t try to pull them off. Instead, soak them in a solution of 1/2 water and 1/2 peroxide, and then gently lift them off.

Traditional stitches are the preferred option for wound closure in some circumstances. These include:

  • large cuts
  • cuts that are on a curved area or an area that moves a lot, such as a joint (the bandages will not be able to properly hold the skin in place)
  • cuts that don’t stop bleeding
  • cuts where fat (yellow) is exposed
  • cuts where muscle (dark red) is exposed

Since sutures tend to heal more cleanly than butterfly stitches, they’re also commonly used for cuts on the face or other places where scarring might be a concern.

If you’ve applied butterfly stitches, you should see your doctor if:

  • The cut doesn’t stop bleeding. Continued bleeding is an indication that butterfly stitches might not have been the best treatment choice.
  • The cut becomes red, swollen, or more painful. This could be a sign of infection.

Butterfly stitches are narrow adhesive bandages that are used to close small, shallow cuts.

They’re used instead of stitches by medical professionals and can be applied at home under the right circumstances.

The butterfly stitch is a great way to close wounds quickly and effectively. It should be applied about 1/8 inch apart, with the middle of your bandage going across where you want it closed off Brunetto using enough pressure so that no gaps form between each individual thread when they’re all put together at their full length.

To reduce the amount of pain you feel after surgery, try holding an ice pack on your wound for 15-20 minutes every hour or as told by healthcare provider.

To get rid of a bandage without scratching your skin, simply soak the cotton ball or swab in baby oil and rub it over wounds. If you don’t have any on hand just use olive oils/petroleum jelly- they’ll work just as well!

The only way to remove surgical staples is with a license and specific tools, so don’t try this at home! Always see your doctor if you think there are any problems.

The first thing you should do when removing staples is put the lower jaw of your remover under a staple and squeeze those handles together until they close. This will bend this one middle piece so that it pulls all three edges out from beneath skin level, making removal much easier! Be careful not to dig too deeply though because if there are any underlying injuries then we may need medical assistance for further treatment–so call 000 immediately after using these techniques

Steri- Strips are a necessary evil for adults who want to maintain their teeth, but they aren’t always easy. Once you soak them in water (without any bubbles) and let your newly unstucked self do its job the adhesive will come off on its own or if not just gently pull it away from where ever there’s stuck until no residue remains behind at all!

When removing a bandage, don’t pull away from the skin but rather push it slightly so that you can avoid any pain and harsh removal process on your incision.

\u00a9 2021 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube. Some people are sensitive to these products and may develop a rash. The content of this article is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis, or treatment. First Aid Supplies

\u00a9 2021 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. Looking for a dress for that work night out or just a long overdue drinks with the girls? Most standard first aid kits come with sterile gauze pads, absorbent bandages, adhesive tape, roller bandages, and a triangular bandage, as well as regular adhesive bandages. Looking for butterfly bandages? Watch for signs of infection. [deleted] 1 year ago. Shop boohoo Australia’s collection today. If you get a large cut, you should go to a doctor for stitches, particularly if the cut is on the face where a scar would be most visible. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. The butterfly bandage must be placed across a cut to keep the sides together. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Found inside“I’ll have to use butterfly bandages to try to pull the skin together. I’ve got tape and gauze so I’ll wrap it tightly. That should hold you until I can get . Call your doctor for deep cuts, puncture wounds, or injuries that don’t stop bleeding after several minutes of pressure. But it’s important to know when a cut might need medical care or even a few stitches. Before you apply your bandage, rinse the cut with cool, running water to clean out any dirt or debris. But you’ll want to keep them covered to keep dirt out. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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A first aid kit should contain several kinds of bandages that can be used to treat various types of cuts. One kind of bandage that you should have is a butterfly bandage. This can be used to treat a moderately serious injury. Here are some guidelines on when and how to use a butterfly bandage.

When to Use a Butterfly Bandage

A butterfly bandage can be used to seal a cut that is relatively small but deep. It should be used on a wound that is straight, not jagged. A wound of that kind may gape open. A butterfly bandage can close the wound to promote healing and reduce the risk of scarring. A butterfly bandage works best on a cut that is less than two inches in length. If the cut is longer, more than one bandage can be used to close it.

A butterfly bandage should not be used over a movable joint, such as an elbow, knuckle, or knee, because movement will pull on the cut and cause the wound to gape open. Cuts on movable joints should be treated with sutures by a doctor. If you have a very deep laceration, you should have a doctor evaluate it to decide if you need stitches.

How to Apply a Butterfly Bandage

Before you apply the butterfly bandage, you should clean and disinfect the wound. Apply the bandage across the width of the cut. Start on one side, apply the bandage, press the skin together to seal the cut, and then lightly apply the other side of the butterfly bandage to the skin on the other side of the cut. Avoid stretching the skin. You can cover the wound with gauze and adhesive to keep the bandage in place and keep the wound clean.

What to Do after You Apply a Butterfly Bandage

If you treat a cut with a butterfly bandage, leave the bandage on until it peels off on its own. It can take up to 10 to 14 days for the wound to heal. See a doctor if you experience redness around the site of the injury, red streaks, fever, drainage, swelling, tenderness in your groin or armpit, or an increase in pain or tenderness at the site of the injury.

Order a First Aid Kit from 1st Aid Supplies

1st Aid Supplies sells first aid kits and cabinets designed for work, home, school, and outdoor activities such as hiking and camping. Our kits come stocked with many essential supplies you may need to treat common injuries, including butterfly bandages. Every home, school, and business should have at least one first aid kit so you can be prepared to treat an unexpected injury. Order a first aid kit from 1st Aid Supplies today.

Holding the two sides of the incision together, apply the butterfly stitches to the wound surface. Don’t apply the butterfly stitch lengthwise, and make sure the centre of the bandage crosses the wound in the middle of the stitch. Butterfly stitches should be spaced approximately 1/8 of an inch apart, and you can use as many as you need.

How often do you change butterfly strips?

After two weeks, carefully peel away any residual Steri-Strips from your skin. If the strips begin to curl before it is time to remove them, you can cut them to make them more pliable. Incisions made with tissue glue should be maintained out of direct sunlight and the adhesive should be kept completely dry. Within five to ten days, the adhesive will have dried out and fallen off.

When should you stop wrapping a wound?

You should remove the bandage and leave it off whenever you are confident that the wound will not become inflamed or unclean.

How long should I cover a wound?

When wounds are kept wet and covered, a small number of studies have discovered that blood vessels regenerate more quickly and the number of cells that produce inflammation decreases more rapidly than when wounds are left to air out. Keeping a wound wet and covered for at least five days is the recommended course of action.

How long do you leave butterfly bandages on?

It is possible to have the butterfly stitches removed if they are still present after 12 days, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina. Don’t even think about trying to get them off.

How long do you leave butterfly stitches on?

The butterfly stitches can be securely removed 12 days after they are placed. Do not take the sutures out of the incision to avoid the danger of reopening the wound. Instead, immerse the sutures in a solution made up of half hydrogen peroxide and half water for a few minutes. Because of the solution’s ability to remove the adhesive, it is simple to gently take the stitches out of the wound.

Can you put antibiotic ointment on steri-strips?

Use a moderate soap and water to clean the area, then gently wipe it dry with a fresh towel. An unsterilized steri-stripped wound usually only needs this minimal level of attention. – Steri-strips should not be pulled, tugged, or rubbed. Steri-strips should not be moistened with Vaseline petroleum jelly, antibiotic cream, or lotion, since this will cause the strips to become loose.

When can steri-strips get wet?

The wound can become moist during normal cleaning activities (showering, handwashes) after 48 hours, but it should remain dry otherwise. 3 – If the Steri-Strips’ edges become loose, clip the free ends of each strip using a pair of scissors.

What happens if you remove steri-strips too soon?

You should not remove them too soon, even if they are irritating or causing you distress. If you are instructed to remove the steristrips, do so with caution. If you tug on the wound too forcefully, you may cause it to open.

Do wounds need air to heal?

Contrary to popular belief, wounds heal best when they are kept wet rather than dry. Leaving a wound exposed might cause the healing process to be slowed down.

What is the fastest way to heal an open wound?

Putting a bandage on the wound:

  1. The skin around minor cuts and scrapes can be left unprotected, however moisture is normally required to aid in the healing process. Open wounds that are deep in the skin may require stitches or staples. Make sure that big open wounds are kept covered and moisturized so that the quick creation of new skin tissues will expedite the healing process

Do wounds heal better covered or uncovered?

Q: Is it preferable to bandage a cut or sore, or should it be allowed to air out? In most cases, drying out wounds is counterproductive since wounds require moisture to heal. It is possible to dry off fresh surface cells on a wound by leaving it exposed, which can increase discomfort and impede the healing process.

How do you tell if a wound is infected?

Recognizing the signs of a wound infection

  1. A fever and chills, aches and pains, nausea, and vomiting are all symptoms of a wound infection. Yellow or green drainage from the site
  2. a foul stench emanating from the wound
  3. red streaks on the skin around the lesion.

Do wounds heal faster when you sleep?

According to an article by Andy Coghlan in New Scientist, researchers have discovered that wounds acquired during the day heal twice as quickly as those sustained at night. When you are damaged, a kind of skin cell known as fibroblasts migrates to the site of the injury to prepare the ground for new skin cells to form.

Which ointment is best for wound?

A first aid antibiotic ointment (Bacitracin, Neosporin, Polysporin) can be applied to the wound to assist prevent infection and keep the wound moist while the lesion heals. It is also crucial to continue to take care of the wound. Use soap and water to gently wash the affected area three times a day. Then apply an antibiotic ointment and re-cover the area with a bandage.

How to apply a butterfly bandage

In case you are wondering how to apply the butterfly stitch, simply hold two sides of an open wound together and make a zig-zag pattern with your fingers in between. Make sure that this is done across the width ofthe bandage so it can cover as much area as possible; don’t worry if there aren’t enough spaces for all three layers because we’ll add more later on! Place about 1/8 inch apart for optimal sturdiness (though less space may also work).
The final result should look something like:

You can also hold an ice pack over your wound to reduce pain, swelling and bruising. Place the cold compress on top of the injury for 15-20 minutes every hour or as told by your healthcare provider!

To remove a bandage without charts, soak one cotton ball or swab in baby oil and gently rub over the area until it falls off. If you don’t have any on hand then olive oil will do just fine as well!

Surgical staples are very important for wounds to close properly and should never be removed by individuals who don’t know what they’re doing. Always have a licensed medical professional remove your surgical steel, as it could cause complications if not done correctly! The doctor will use special tools that ensure no harm comes along in this process while opening up their certification options at the same time.

To remove staples, place the lower jaw of a staple remover under each one. Squeeze handles completely to close device and then press down gently on top where you see two grey circles until they are all bent inwards towards each other; this should cause them to spring apart easily enough so that only their outer edges remain stuck into your skin at once point during removal process if there is still any visible stapling line left behind afterwards as well which can be pulled up with slight resistance while pulling outward motion away from incision site when finished

In order to remove the pesky adhesive on your medical implants, you need water. Soak it in a bath without any bubbles for 15 minutes and allow the glue come unstuck by itself or gently pull them off if not ready yet! It’s important that when removing steri-strips never get wet until they are due because then there will be no other option but let go all together; this could cause severe consequences with possible infections so make sure first use protection is always used – like gloves while handling sterile instruments during surgery prep etc

When you remove a bandage without inflicting pain, do not pull the skin away from it. Instead just pry up any parts of your body that are sticking out and then slowly peel this layer off until there’s nothing left on top!
The process will be gentler for tender skin surrounding injuries because less pressure is needed when we rip these layers off instead grabbing at their raw surface with our hands or fingers.

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Wash and dry your hands before applying any dressing, and wear disposable surgical gloves if you have them.

  • sit or lie down, or get the person who’s bleeding to do this
  • if you’re helping someone else, tell them what you’re doing as you apply the dressing
  • stop any bleeding by applying pressure and raising the affected leg or arm higher than the heart
  • use a dressing that’s slightly bigger than the wound you want it to cover
  • hold the dressing at the edges, keeping your fingers away from the part that’s going to cover the wound

Sterile dressing pads attached to bandages

Sterile (hygienic) dressing pads come in a protective wrapping. Once out of the wrapping, they’re no longer sterile.

When applying one:

  • clean and dry the wound and surrounding skin
  • hold the bandage on either side of the pad
  • lay the pad directly on the wound
  • wind the short end once around the limb and the pad
  • wind the other end around the limb to cover the whole pad
  • tie the ends together over the pad to secure it, and put slight pressure on the wound

Dressings should be replaced on a regular basis

If the wound is severe, you may need to go to a minor injuries unit after applying the dressing.

If you cannot stop the bleeding, go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department as soon as possible.

Plasters (adhesive dressings)

Plasters are made from a piece of gauze and have a sticky (adhesive) backing. They’re usually wrapped in single sterile packs.

They sometimes come in different shapes and sizes, or you can cut them to size. Some plasters are waterproof.

When applying one:

  • clean and dry the wound and surrounding skin – see How do I clean a wound?
  • unwrap the plaster and hold it by the protective strips with the pad side facing down
  • peel back the strips, but do not remove them
  • place the pad on the wound, pull away the strips, and press the edges of the plaster down

Plasters should be replaced every time they get dirty or wet, or if the blood soaks through.

A small number of people are allergic to the adhesive strips – ask them if this is the case before applying a plaster.

Butterfly bandages are used to close deep lacerations and to heal major cuts. The adhesive surface of the bandage sticks well to skin without sticking to the wound.

  • Description
  • Additional information

A butterfly bandage can be used to close a deep laceration and to heal a major cut if you are not able to get to a hospital for stitches. A butterfly bandage can keep the wound closed and promote speedy healing. The bandage is easy to apply by sticking it to one side of the wound, pulling it over the wound, and sticking it to the other side. The adhesive surface of the bandage sticks well to skin without sticking to the wound. A butterfly bandage is an easy way to provide quick first aid for a cut that occurs at home or at work.

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A first aid kit should contain several kinds of bandages that can be used to treat various types of cuts. One kind of bandage that you should have is a butterfly bandage. This can be used to treat a moderately serious injury. Here are some guidelines on when and how to use a butterfly bandage.

When to Use a Butterfly Bandage

A butterfly bandage can be used to seal a cut that is relatively small but deep. It should be used on a wound that is straight, not jagged. A wound of that kind may gape open. A butterfly bandage can close the wound to promote healing and reduce the risk of scarring. A butterfly bandage works best on a cut that is less than two inches in length. If the cut is longer, more than one bandage can be used to close it.

A butterfly bandage should not be used over a movable joint, such as an elbow, knuckle, or knee, because movement will pull on the cut and cause the wound to gape open. Cuts on movable joints should be treated with sutures by a doctor. If you have a very deep laceration, you should have a doctor evaluate it to decide if you need stitches.

How to Apply a Butterfly Bandage

Before you apply the butterfly bandage, you should clean and disinfect the wound. Apply the bandage across the width of the cut. Start on one side, apply the bandage, press the skin together to seal the cut, and then lightly apply the other side of the butterfly bandage to the skin on the other side of the cut. Avoid stretching the skin. You can cover the wound with gauze and adhesive to keep the bandage in place and keep the wound clean.

What to Do after You Apply a Butterfly Bandage

If you treat a cut with a butterfly bandage, leave the bandage on until it peels off on its own. It can take up to 10 to 14 days for the wound to heal. See a doctor if you experience redness around the site of the injury, red streaks, fever, drainage, swelling, tenderness in your groin or armpit, or an increase in pain or tenderness at the site of the injury.

Order a First Aid Kit from 1st Aid Supplies

1st Aid Supplies sells first aid kits and cabinets designed for work, home, school, and outdoor activities such as hiking and camping. Our kits come stocked with many essential supplies you may need to treat common injuries, including butterfly bandages. Every home, school, and business should have at least one first aid kit so you can be prepared to treat an unexpected injury.

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OSHA requirements are set by statute, standards and regulations. Our interpretation letters explain these requirements and how they apply to particular circumstances, but they cannot create additional employer obligations. This letter constitutes OSHA’s interpretation of the requirements discussed. Note that our enforcement guidance may be affected by changes to OSHA rules. Also, from time to time we update our guidance in response to new information. To keep apprised of such developments, you can consult OSHA’s website at https://www.osha.gov.

The Honorable Bob Graham
United States Senate
Washington, D.C. 20510-0903

Dear Senator Graham:

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to address the concerns of your constituent, John H. Michels regarding OSHA’s regulations pertaining to the application of butterfly bandages. Let me assure you OSHA does not regulate, in any manner, who may apply butterfly bandages, nor under what circumstances or how they should be applied.

The quote referenced by Mr. Michels from the March 1996 issue of “Reason” appears to be a misrepresentation of OSHA’s occupational injury and illness recordkeeping requirements. Each year, certain employers are required to maintain records of occupational injuries and illnesses which occur to their employees. As stated in Section 8(c)(2) of the OSH Act, “the Secretary, shall issue regulations requiring employers to maintain accurate records of, and to make periodic reports on, work-related deaths, injuries and illnesses other than minor injuries requiring only first aid treatment and which do not involve medical treatment, loss of consciousness, restriction of work or motion, or transfer to another job.” In 1971, OSHA issued regulation 29 CFR Part 1904, Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses which states that occupational injuries involving medical treatment must be recorded on the OSHA Log and Summary of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.

In 1986, OSHA published the Recordkeeping Guidelines for Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (enclosed) to provide employers with supplemental instructions to the recordkeeping forms. On page 43 of the Recordkeeping Guidelines, OSHA provides guidance for recording lacerations which entail the use of wound closures such as adhesive dressings, sutures, butterfly, and Steri-Strips(TM). Wound closures are considered medical treatment for OSHA injury and illness recordkeeping purposes and thus constitute a recording criteria. On the other hand, wound coverings, such as Band-Aid bandages(TM), are always considered first aid treatment for recordkeeping purposes. On page 42 of the Recordkeeping Guidelines, OSHA states “medical treatment can be provided to employees by lay persons; i.e., someone other than a physician or registered medical personnel.” Furthermore, Q&A F-3 on page 44 of the Recordkeeping Guidelines states “The regulations have been interpreted to mean that medical treatment may be administered by medical or nonmedical personnel. The treatment is the main factor to consider in distinguishing medical treatment from first aid, not the person who is administering it. In distinguishing between medical treatment and first aid, Congress intended to focus on the seriousness of the injury. Doctors or medical personnel often provide first aid treatment for minor injuries; nonmedical personnel often provide medical treatment for certain injuries that are relatively serious in nature.” Clearly, OSHA does not limit the use of these wound closures in any way.

I hope this information will help you answer your constituent’s concerns. If Mr. Michels would like to further discuss these issues, or needs any further assistance, please have him contact the OSHA Division of Recordkeeping Requirements by phone at (202) 219-6463 or by writing:

Butterfly bandages, Superglue and Home Sutures

Wounds come in a variety of shapes, sizes, depths etc. That will determine whether you use Butterfly bandages, super glue or home sutures.

Butterfly bandages can be used to hold a wound together that does not necessarily need stitches, but that will heal better if held together. They are fairly inexpensive ($2.00 for 10 at most stores). Super glue is best when used on a part of the body that will not be stressed. For instance, the skin on your head is not pulled and stretched like the skin on your calf or your finger. Home Sutures are for deep wounds that are located in a stress zone (hands, arms, legs etc).

When using butterfly bandages:

*Clean wound thoroughly with hydrogen peroxide or warm soapy water.

*Be sure to remove all debris.

*Cayenne can be sprinkled into the wound to stop the pain, sterilize the wound and stop the bleeding.

*Let the wound sit for a few minutes until the pain has subsided some.

*Gently clean the outer edges of the wound and dry it completely. This should be done by blotting not wiping as wiping can pull the wound apart more.

*Attach the butterfly bandages on one side of the wound. If you will need three bandages then attach all three on one side. Then sprinkle a very thin amount of Echinacea (fights infection) and Goldenseal (antibacterial and anti-inflammatory) on the opening of the wound.

*Gently pull the butterfly bandages over to the opposite side of the wound and attach.The Echinacea and Goldenseal needs to be present only on the thinnest part of the butterfly bandage because you don’t want it to interfere with the adhesive on the bandage.

*Do not allow the wound to get wet.

*Check for discomfort, redness and heat coming from the wound.

*Keep the bandages in place for approximately 7 days.

Superglue is truley amazing! I was told purchasing the anti-fungal super glue for nails was the best option, but any superglue would work. My experience has told me that when treating my loved ones the cheap super runny super glue takes longer to dry and makes a bigger (especially in hair) mess. I have found it worth the investment to buy the $3 Anti-fungal superglue, it is still much less expensive than a trip to the ER. It is a common staple in our food storage

When using Super glue:

*A new unopened container of superglue. Throw it away after it is used.

*4 – 6 pairs of medical latex gloves

*Preferably 2 helpers

*New unopened gauze squares (2”-4”) do not get the coated gauze you need it to be very absorbant

*Large container of petroleum jelly

*Pain killer, aspirin or Tylenol if necessary

Go throw up in the bathroom and get that out of the way! Make sure that you have a helper who has also already thrown up, washed their hands and put on their gloves. If your helper is a child be sure to tell them that they absolutely can not squeeze the glue! Just trust me on that one! Wash your own hands and then put on a pair of medical latex gloves. Clean wound thoroughly with hydrogen peroxide or warm soapy water. Be sure to remove all debris. If the wound is a wound from a human mouth, ie bite or tooth imbedded in your Childs head, it is very prone to infection. It is important that the wound is thoroughly cleaned and then start the child on garlic, acidophilus and probiotics immediately after gluing.

You need to push or pull the wound back together so that it matches up. You are doing this so that you can make a plan. If there is a spot that doesn’t match up because part of the flesh was lost then you may need to stitch it instead. If it looks like you can match it up fairly reasonably then let it lay open again. If it is very painful you may want to put some cayenne in the wound to help with the pain. I have never had to use cayenne for pain, although my kids never complain much either. For healing aid in the elderly or someone with a weakened immune system you can sprinkle a little Echinacea and Goldenseal in the wound.

Now make sure your helper is standing close with the superglue ready and the gauze is nearby handy. Push or pull the wound together again. Hold the wound in place until you are completely done. Using the gauze gently blot dry the wound. Wait a few minutes and make sure that it is not leaking a lot of fluid. Blot it dry again if necessary.

Then using the superglue start at the highest point of the wound and apply the super glue down the wound without touching the skin. If this is a head wound then there is hair that is bound to be in the way. Hold the hair as flat as you can when you are holding the wound together.

DO NOT CUT THE HAIR If you cut the hair then it will push the superglue away as it grows back in.

After you have applied the superglue carefully so as to not glue your glove to your childs head (yep, did that once) wait for the glue to dry. As the superglue dries it changes color from clear to a matte. When it is dry release your hold and it should stay together by itself. Do not bandage the glued wound. Do not allow the wound to get wet.

Check for discomfort, redness and heat coming from the wound. After 10 days you can start to use the petroleum jelly to break down the superglue. Be patient!

Do not pull the wound apart. I do not let my kids take their own superglue off. Just coat the superglue with petroleum jelly and work the glue off. When I used cheap super runny glue Kady had to walk around with a chunk of super glue in her hair for a very long time until her hair grew out. Throw away all supplies. Do not reuse. The risk of contamination increases if you use supplies that are not newly opened.

Have you ever wondered how to do something that is not in your comfort or knowledge zone? Go check out www.wonderhowto.com for great how to videos, including suturing videos!

Important for Suturing:

*Clean wound thoroughly with hydrogen peroxide or warm soapy water.

*Be sure to remove all debris.

*Cayenne can be poured into the wound to stop the pain. (With my animals I give them vodka because they need something that will knock them out so they don’t bite me.) Begin as far away from the opening as the opening is deep. Grab some tissue on your way back up.

*Close each stitch with 3 closures over – under – over or under -over – under.

*Be sure to cut the ends of the sutures just short enough that they will not get tangled in the next suture or the wound and just long enough that they can be easily removed.

*Coat the wound with a topical ointment. I would suggest a paste made of a triple antibiotic ointment and equal amounts Echinacea and Goldenseal.

*Bandage loosely. Do not allow the wound to get wet. Check for discomfort, redness and heat coming

*Emergency suture kits that include all of the necessary equipment run about $50. The kits that just have the needle, sutures and driver are about $7-$10 each.

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When applying bandages to elbows and knees to hold dressings in place or support sprains or strains, flex the joint slightly, apply the bandage in a figure of 8, and extend the bandage quite far on each side of the joint.

When applying bandages on hands to hold dressings in place or support sprains and strains, work from the inside of the wrist using diagonal turns across the back of the hand to the end of the little finger, leaving the thumb free.

Tubular bandages

Tubular bandages are used to hold dressings on fingers or toes, or support injured joints. They’re made of seamless fabric tube.

You can get elasticated ones to place over joints such as the ankle. Ones made of tubular gauze can be placed over fingers or toes, but do not provide any pressure to stop bleeding.

Before placing a tubular bandage over an injury, you may need to cut it to a smaller size.

Triangular bandages

Triangular bandages can be used as large dressings, as slings to support a limb, or to secure a dressing in place.

If you’re using a triangular bandage as a sling on an arm, you use it opened out.

  • ask the person to hold their arm across their chest and support the arm while you work
  • put the bandage under the arm and around the back of the neck
  • put the other half of the bandage over the arm to meet at the shoulder and tie into a knot
  • tuck the loose ends of the bandage in at the elbow, or use a pin

If you’re using a triangular bandage to support a lower limb or large dressing, fold it in half horizontally so the point of the triangle touches the middle of the long edge. Then fold it in half again in the same direction to make a broad strip.

Well, move over Steri-Strips — because there’s a new solution in town, and it’s pretty darn neat!

Called ClozeX, it’s a needleless, adhesive-based wound closure that’s incredibly easy to apply and can used to treat both trauma lacerations and surgical incisions. It’s reportedly been used in more than 10,000 surgeries in fifty hospitals — with surgeries including appendectomies, hernias and pediatric heart surgery. Eleven different sizes are available, and these can be placed side by side in situations requiring larger closures.

“The applications in the real world include closing surgery incisions in every hospital,” Michael Lebner, founder of ClozeX Medical, told Digital Trends. “For the emergency department, patients — especially children — fearful of needles can have a better ClozeX closure without the fear of a needle for the anesthetic and the suture closure. Because it is easy to learn and use there will be significant use outside the hospitals. It begins with health-care trained: medics, first responders, nurses [and] EMTs, and will become a standard in mini-clinics.”

Lebner, who isn’t a trained physician, created ClozeX after his daughter suffered a snowboarding knee injury and his wife suffered a hand laceration: both resulting in unsightly looking scars after they were sutured. In the aftermath, he turned his invention skills to coming up with an alternative. Since then, development has been a decade-long process, although Lebner said that the resulting product is ready to roll out to the general public.

“We expect [the] ClozeX product to be available in about eight weeks,” he said. Information about product pricing, training and the like will follow in the coming days and weeks. Between this, 3D-printed skin and smart bandages that use nanosensors to track how a wound is healing, it’s like an ER department from the future.

Provided ClozeX works as well as it looks like it does, this could turn out to be a real game-changer. At the very least, we’ve got this oddly satisfying video to enjoy!

Dieser Artikel wurde unter Mitarbeit der Luba Lee, FNP-BC, MS. Luba Lee ist eine staatlich geprüfte Familienkrankenschwester in Tennessee. Sie erhielt ihren Master 2006 von der Universität Tennessee.

Falls du einen kleinen, flachen Schnitt hast, den du schließen möchtest, benutze Butterfly-Verbände. Wenn entschieden ist, dass du nicht genäht werden musst, reinige die Wunde mit kühlem Wasser. Lege den Butterfly-Verband so über den Schnitt, dass er verschlossen ist. Befestige den Verband, indem du einen weiteren Butterfly-Verband darüber und darunter klebst. Lege dann zwei weitere Butterfly-Verbände senkrecht neben den Schnitt.

How to apply a butterfly bandage

  • Vermeide es, Antiseptika oder Wasserstoffperoxid über den Schnitt zu gießen. Diese harschen Reiniger können die Verletzung sogar reizen.
  • Der Butterfly-Verband hält besser, wenn er auf sauberer, trockener Haut befestigt wird.
  • Falls du welche hast, trage einen Tupfer antibiotische Salbe auf die Wunde. Das beschleunigt den Heilungsvorgang und beugt einer Infektion vor.

How to apply a butterfly bandage

Drücke nicht stark, während du den Schnitt ausrichtest, sonst könntest du ihn wieder zum Bluten bringen.

Steri Strips are thin, adhesive strips used to hold wounds closed while they heal. The strips are often used instead of bandages or dressings. While you can purchase Steri Strips (sometimes called butterfly bandages) at pharmacies, your doctor will most often be the person to apply a Steri Strip. It is important they are applied properly, which is why it is best to consult with your doctor before application. Once the Steri Strips are applied to a wound, caring for them requires only that you keep them dry and regularly observe the wound for signs of infection.

Review your doctor’s instructions for wound care 1. If you have had surgery or another minor procedure, follow all your doctor’s instructions for caring for your wound.

Neosporin for Scar Removal

Prevent your wound and Steri Strips from getting wet. Do not take baths. When you shower, cover the wound with plastic wrap or a plastic bag to keep your strips, stitches and wound as dry as possible. Wetness under the Steri Strips can lead to an increased risk of infection.

Check the wound often for redness, odor or other signs of infection. Steri Strips assist in closing the wound, but they do not prevent infection. Wounds can become infected for a variety of reasons. If you have any concerns, contact your doctor immediately.

How to Apply Steri Strips

Steri Strips may fall off the skin after 10 days. Leave the Steri Strips in place until they fall off on their own accord or until your doctor determines it is appropriate to remove them. If the wound has healed and your doctor says you can remove the strips, use lotion or a small amount of water to loosen them from your skin.

Attend all follow-up appointments, even if your wound appears healed and the strips have come off.

Warnings

Contact your doctor if you think you are having an allergic reaction to the Steri Strips. Skin can be sensitive to the ingredients in adhesive bandages. If you develop a rash, redness or have other discomfort on your skin you may need to seek an alternative.

How to apply a butterfly bandage

Butterfly bandages, also known as butterfly closures, are bandages that are designed for small wounds, but those that are much deeper than surface scratches. As opposed to traditional bandages that simply close up the wound, promote the healing process and protect it from environmental contaminants, butterfly bandages are designed to be placed on either side of a deep cut, where they can close this gap to lessen scarring and lessen the total healing time after an injury (Harvard Health Publishing).

Butterfly bandages are ideally suited for wounds that are 2 inches long or more, and they can also be layered on top of a larger cut in some cases. For larger wounds that may require stitches, butterfly bandages are the preferred choice to keep these wounds closed until the injured person can seek medical attention.

How are butterfly bandages used?

In the event of a deep cut that may require stitches, butterfly bandages are the best option for those who are administering first aid. After first cleaning and disinfecting the wound, butterfly bandages are best applied width-wise across the length of the cut. Start by placing one side of the butterfly bandage on one side of the wound, and squeeze the skin tight around the cut to seal it shut and then apply the other side of the butterfly bandage to keep it closed. Butterfly bandages are a staple in first aid kit and medical settings, and are available over-the-counter. These products are fully eligible for reimbursement with consumer-directed healthcare accounts as they have a wealth of potential medical uses.

Earlier there were one two simple bandages, which were publicly available at retail store due to which confusion was less there in minds of people which one to way. But, now with advancement of medical science technology, a number of different types of bandages have come forth and now are easily available at medical retail shops; which were earlier available only in hospitals or on special demand.

So, what are these different types? Yes, what are these different types of bandages? If you ask me, are types of bandages discussed in this article are all the total types of bandages available

Tension bandage commonly known as “Garm Patti” in India is used in case of minor soft tissue injuries for healing purposes.

Donut bandage as name suggests is of shape of donut; but does not contain chocolate, if you are thinking that. It just has shape of donut and used in case of punctured wounds, where something foreign minor object has entered inside puncture wound; for expulsion of which this donut bandage is applied. But remember, center hole of this bandage should come over or encircle punctured wound and adhesive tape is applied on sides of this bandage for sticking purpose but not at center hole portion.

Moleskin is somewhat similar to donut bandage, but not as thick as donut bandage. In fact, it is thin than it and its center hole portion is placed over or encircle blister and thin adhesive bandage is applied over this center hole portion, to prevent contamination of blister.

As name suggests main purpose of it is pressure application, but also contains medicated antiseptic at one end. This medicated end is placed over wound and rest of non-medicated long thin portion of pressure bandage is rolled over the wound, when wound is on arm or legs, thigh or forearm and then 2nd end after complete rolling is sealed with adhesive tape.

Steri-Strips are thin adhesive bandages often used by surgeons as a backup to dissolvable stitches or after regular stitches are removed.

They’re also available for purchase in local pharmacies for self-care. You can use them to help close shallow cuts or wounds, but it’s important to seek medical treatment for severe injuries.

Steri-Strips are also called butterfly stitches or butterfly bandages when they are thin in the middle and have two wide, sticky areas at each end, like the wings of a butterfly. But not all Steri-Strips look like this. The type most commonly used by surgeons are straight, thin strips.

If you’re not sure how to take care of Steri-Strips, or how to apply them or remove them, this article will walk you through all the details you need to know.

Steri-Strips are typically used for cuts or wounds that aren’t too severe, or for minor surgery.

They help seal wounds by pulling the two sides of the skin together without making any contact with the actual wound. This reduces the chance of introducing any bacteria or other substances into the cut.

Steri-Strips are sometimes a better option than regular stitches because they don’t need to be sewn into the skin and can be easily removed when the wound heals.

When considering whether to use Steri-Strips to close a wound, you’ll want to ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are the edges of the wound straight? Steri-Strips are best for shallow cuts that have straight, clean edges.
  • Is the bleeding light and manageable? Use a sterile cloth to put pressure on the cut for at least 5 minutes. Don’t use Steri-Strips if the cut is still bleeding after 5 minutes.
  • Is the wound less than a 1/2 inch in length? Steri-Strips aren’t recommended for cuts that are a 1/2 inch or longer.
  • Is it in an area where the skin doesn’t move a lot? Steri-strips may not work well on joints or other areas where it may have trouble staying in place.

Typically, your doctor or surgeon will apply Steri-Strips after surgery or treatment for an injury. But you may need to apply them at home if you can’t get medical care right away.

Once a Steri-Strip has been applied to a wound, it’s important to take good care of it.

If a doctor or surgeon applied Steri-Strips to your wound, you can simply wait for the strips fall off when they’re ready.

If you applied Steri-Strips to your own minor wound and it has healed, here’s how to safely remove the strips:

Seek immediate medical attention if a wound:

  • won’t stop bleeding after 10 minutes of applying pressure
  • was caused by something unclean or rusty
  • is too deep or long to be covered by Steri-Strips
  • causes intense pain
  • is filled with dirt that you can’t clean out
  • is in a joint you can’t move — this may mean a nerve, muscle, or tendon has been injured

Also be sure to keep a close eye on the wound once a Steri-Strip has been applied. Get medical care right away if you notice the wound:

  • won’t stop bleeding
  • becomes red, swollen, or filled with pus
  • becomes more painful

Steri-Strips are often a good backup or alternative to regular stitches if a wound isn’t too deep or severe.

But, like stitches or other types of wound closures, they need to be applied and removed correctly. You also need to pay careful attention to them while they’re helping a wound to heal.

It’s also important to keep an eye on your wound and to get care if doesn’t stop bleeding, or shows signs of infection.

Adhesive bandages are thin textile strips that adhere to skin. The purpose of the How to apply a butterfly bandagebandage is to protect a small to medium sized wound or scab. This includes keeping the site clear of friction, bacteria, damage, or dirt, enabling the healing process to proceed undisturbed. Some bandages have antiseptic properties to accelerate the healing rate and reduce infection.

How are they designed?

/media/Hansaplast/international/magazin/health-and-protection/wound-dressing-know-how/dressing03_270px.png” />These bandages are manufactured primarily with woven polyurethane, polyethylene, or latex. One side of the bandage has an adhesive applied to stick securely to the skin and help hold wounds together. A small, non-sticky pad is located on adhesive side of the strip. The pad is commonly composed of either cotton or a water-absorbing gel to collect any fluid leaving the wound. In some cases the cotton is coated with a porous polymer to prevent it from sticking to the wound. The pad covers the actual injury site and is where the antiseptics would be located. Some bandages are occlusive dressings, meaning they are air and water tight. Others do not fully conceal the wound, leaving the sides open to allow the wound to “breathe”. Some advantages to current bandage designs are that they are convenient, inexpensive, protect wounds fairly well, and overall accelerate the healing of the wound. There are a few disadvantages to current bandage designs such as the need for frequent changing due to not adhering long enough and becoming over saturated with blood as well as preventing aeration of the wound.

*Surface Modifications: The pad may be medicated with an antiseptic solution, antibacterial surface coating on pad, or water absorbing gel on pad.

**Alternative treatments: Liquid bandages, spray on bandages.

There are a few common allergy concerns that may come with the use of adhesive bandages. The most common allergic reaction is that of the latex, which may cause further inflammation of the wound. Some allergies can also arise from the adhesives used on the bandage, which can cause redness and itchiness to sensitive skin. To avoid these allergies, bandages are produced using a variety of materials and adhesives.

Food preparation workers use bandages which have a very strong adhesive and are waterproof, helping to prevent them from falling off. The color of the bandage is usually blue- a color not normally found in food. This helps to identify the bandage in the case that it does become removed from the body. Some bandages include a metal strip which is detected by machines during food manufacturing, ensure the food is free from foreign objects (Safety First Aid Group Ltd., 2016). Transdermal patches are adhesive bandages with the function to distribute medication through the skin, rather than protecting a wound (Segal, 2001). Butterfly closures are generally thin adhesive strips which can be used to

How to apply a butterfly bandage

close small wounds. They are applied across the laceration in a manner which pulls the skin on either side of the wound together. They are not true sutures, but can often be used in addition to, or in place of real sutures for small wounds. Butterfly stitches can be advantageous in that they do not need a medical professional to be placed or removed, and are thus a common item in first aid kits (NHS, 2015).

Manufacturers?

The largest player in the adhesive bandage market is Johnson & Johnson with their Band-aid® brand. The Band-aid® brand has become so popular that adhesive bandages are commonly called “bandaids” no matter which brand is actually being used. Other key manufacturers in the bandage market include Medline with their Curad® brand, 3M with their Nexcare® brand, and Beiersdorf with their Elastoplast® brand.

The major categories that adhesive bandages are evaluated on are their absorption, adhesion, flexibility, barrier properties and any added healing benefits. In most cases manufacturers market their bandages on their ability to perform each of the previous tasks. Bandages vary in shape and desired characteristics based on the location of the wound, the duration the bandage is to be applied, and whether the wound needs to be completely sealed off or allowed to air out. Depending on the circumstances bandages are marketed so that they seem the best fit for the desired end use. Adhesive bandages are also specifically marketed with images, often of television or movie characters on the bandages, so that they appeal to children. Adhesive bandages can be purchased at an extensive list of locations, including supercenters, grocery stores, convenience stores, drug stores, online and more.

First, the packaging of bandage need be removed, as well as the film coverings on the adhesive part of bandage. These bandages have a small piece of gauze centered in on the adhesive tape. The gauze pad should be placed directly over the wound. Once the wound is adequately covered with the pad, gently stretch the adhesive part of the bandage and attach it firmly to the skin surrounding the wound.

How to apply a butterfly bandage

Johnson & Johnson. “Band-Aid Brand Adhesive Bandages.” Johnson & Johnson. N.p., 22 Sept. 2015. Web. 30 Mar. 2016.

Johnson & Johnson. “Myths About Protecting Cuts and Your Skin.” Johnson & Johnson. N.p., 22 Sept. 2015. Web. 24 Mar. 2016.

NHS. “How Do I Apply Butterfly Stitches?” NHS. NHS, 16 Feb. 2015. Web. 16 Apr. 2016.

Safety First Aid Group Ltd. “Blue Detectable Plasters.” Safety First Aid Group Ltd. Safety First Aid Group Ltd., 2016. Web. 16 Apr. 2016.

A dog bandage correctly applied allows proper healing of wounds from injury or incisions from surgery. Bandages stabilize bones and joints, stop bleeding, block germs and reduce pain. Knowing how to properly bandage your dog’s wounds will help your dog get better faster.

Materials for Bandaging Your Dog

Ideally, you should always carry a first aid kit stocked with necessary bandaging supplies, including:

  • antiseptic
  • sterile pads
  • rolls of cotton and gauze
  • adhesive bandages or tape
  • household sticky tape

In addition, should learn how to substitute materials you have on hand to create makeshift bandages if necessary.

How to Bandage Your Dog

  1. Clean and disinfect the wound.
  2. Place a sterile, nonstick, absorbent pad on the wound.
  3. Layer a gauze bandage over the pad, leaving one-third of the bandage exposed with each wrap. In the process, wrap some of your dog’s fur on either side of the pad.
  4. Wrap one layer of adhesive tape or bandage over the gauze bandaging.
  5. Place two fingers under the bandaging, testing for proper pressure. Remove fingers and continue wrapping with adhesive material, extending it over the sides of the underlying gauze.
  6. Remove your fingers, continuing to wrap the adhesive material at the same pressure.
  7. Connect fur and bandage with a strip of sticky tape, as extra insurance against slippage.

Bandaging Tips for Different Injuries

Injuries can happen to any part of your dog’s body. Follow the directions above, using these added tips for different injuries:

  • Ear, bleeding – Place a pad on the affected ear (sanitary pads work well). Wrap long strips of gauze or torn material around the head and over the ears, but not the eyes. Apply adhesive tape or bandage over the gauze, as directed above.
  • Leg wound – Wrap roll cotton over a gauze pad placed on the leg wound; wrap stretch gauze over the cotton; wrap adhesive tape or bandage over the gauze.
  • Leg fracture – Bandage a leg as directed above, also wrapping the joint above and below a fracture. To create a splint, place flat sticks or straight pieces of metal on either side of the leg, securing splints to bandaging with adhesive tape. (Note: Don’t bandage or splint a broken humerus or femur. Also, splints work best on front legs.)
  • Tail wound – Bandage the tail with a pad, gauze, and adhesive material as directed above. Using a long strip of material, secure the tail against the dog’s side to prevent wagging and possible re-injury.
  • Torso wound – Wrap a towel or pillow case around the torso, securing bandaging with pins on the side opposite the wound.

Alternative Materials You Can Use for Bandages

If you do not have bandaging materials available, you can use strips of clean sheets, towels and clothing cut or torn to the right size. You can also use household paper products for pads, sticking them to water-soluble jelly smeared on the wound. In addition, rolled up newspapers and magazines make good splints; for very small dogs, pencils or pens work well, too.

Keeping Bandages Dry, Clean and Secure

Always check and change your dog’s bandages on schedule. Make sure bandages are clean, dry and secure-not too loose or tight. Protect bandages with plastic trash, grocery or bread bags when your dog goes outside to use the restroom. Use an Elizabethan collar to prevent your from dog chewing bandages. Change bandages immediately if they become dirty, wet or dislodged, or you notice any swelling, chafing, redness, discharge or foul odors, contacting your vet immediately.

Butterfly closures, also known as Steri-Strips™ (trademark of 3M), are thin adhesive bandages that are used to close small cuts and wounds. By keeping the edges of the wound together, butterfly closures are an alternative to standard stitches for smaller wounds. They also are applied after the removal of sutures and staples to provide wound support.

STAYGUARD™ IS THE BRAND OF CHOICE

StayGuard™ Butterfly Closures are available in 5 different sizes that are suitable for closing different-sized wounds. Made with premium non-woven and rayon materials, our butterfly closures are durable, breathable, and comfortable. To promote healing and less scarring, butterfly closures stay firmly in place and keep the edges of the wound together. They are ideally designed for smaller cuts and wounds as they cause less scarring and are easier to care for. Made with sterile and medical-grade materials, StayGuard™ Butterfly Closures are ISO, CE, and USFDA certified.

PRODUCT USAGE

StayGuard™ Butterfly Closures are used worldwide in hospitals, operating rooms, homes, and clinics. Available for both consumer and hospital use, StayGuard™ Butterfly Closures can be found in retail stores, pharmacies, hospitals, and other distribution channels. As a common item in most first aid kits, butterfly closures are easy-to-use and can be placed without a medical professional. By promoting the healing process of smaller cuts and wounds, they remain the most popular adhesive bandage for skin closure.