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How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

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Almost every beauty trend leaves and comes back at some point, if not multiple times. Long after a trend's deemed "out of style," people tend to forget all about how sick they were of it before circling back to it in the end. Case in point: mod eye makeup. Those pastel colors, dark creases, and exaggerated lash lines first made popular in the 1960s by figures such as Twiggy and Cher are now trending across TikTok, where every other video seems to feature the look in some capacity.

Everyone's got their own method of creating this fun, retro makeup trend — and well-practiced internet influencers can make it seem wildly easy — but trying it for the first time can be intimidating, especially for those who aren't working with a whole lot of eyelid space or extra-steady hands. To help out, we asked some of our favorite makeup artists to walk us through how to do a 1960s mod eye makeup look.

A black kohl or gel eyeliner (pencil or pot) is non-negotiable for mod eye makeup, as three experts tell Allure. The choice between gel or kohl is up to you, but just make sure it's one that is "very long-lasting and doesn't dry out right away so you have a little window of time to play with it before it dries," as Florida-based makeup artist Lennie Billy explains.

Her favorite is Pretty Vulgar's The Ink Gel Eyeliner in Black List, which she uses with "a very fine, feather-like brush." Pat McGrath Labss Permagel Eyeliner Pencil is bi-coastal makeup artist Lavonne's pick; meanwhile, New York City makeup artist Tommy recommends Clinique's Quickliner, especially for beginners.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Courtesy of brand

Pat McGrath Labs Permagel Eyeliner Pencil

Don't forget your favorite black liquid eyeliner, too — you'll need this for the faux bottom lashes and defining the base shape. Some of Allure's all-time favorites include Stila Stay All Day Waterproof Liquid Eyeliner, Maybelline New York Hyper Easy Waterproof Liquid Liner, and Too Faced Better Than Sex Waterproof Liquid Eyeliner.

Obviously, lashes are pretty damn important when it comes to mod, so top-notch mascara and big, fluttery falsies are also a must. As far as mascara goes, you can reach for your tried-and-true, otherwise, look for formulas you know can perform in the volume department (might we recommend an Allure staff favorite, Anastasia Beverly Hills Lash Brag?). Lavonne has her own line of lashes — she recommends her Mademoiselle style, which she cuts in halves and stacks for application on the outer edges.

On the other hand, Tommy says to "look for a fair fan of lashes that are evenly spaced and the same density all the way across and longest in the center to outer corner." A great example of that would be Ardell's 3D Faux Mink Lash #853.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Courtesy of brand

Maybelline New York Hyper Easy Waterproof Liquid Liner

Also, we hate to tell you this… but you might make a mistake here or there. That's totally OK; it's exactly why Lavonne recommends having cotton swabs and Bioderma micellar water on hand just in case.

Your first instinct might be to tackle that dark, dramatic cut crease first — but that's the hardest part for most people, so Tommy recommends saving that for later. To ease yourself into this kind of makeup, it's great to start with what you know: a pretty run-of-the-mill cat-eye, which you apply with your liquid eyeliner.

"Make a thin line of black liner directly in the groove of the lash line keeping it as thin as possible," Lavonne advises. “Wing it out just a touch but draw it back inwards and stop at the inner corner of your eye.” Tommy recommends similar steps but notes that the outer tail of the wing "should be drawn down instead of up with the natural slope of the eye."

I put "crease" in quotations like that because you aren't literally going to be putting eyeliner in your natural crease — you'll apply it just above it, as all three makeup artists recommend, to create the illusion of bigger, deeper-set eyes.

The key to figuring out where you need to draw your line, Tommy explains, is to create a stencil while looking dead-on into a mirror. Grab your liquid liner and "put a dot near the end of the crease but just above it, then one in the center of the eye [above the crease], and another at the start [or inner part] of the crease," he recommends. You can connect those dots using your gel or kohl eyeliner.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Courtesy of brand

Ardell 3D Faux Mink Lash #853

If you have monolids or hooded eyelids, you might want to take a page from Lavonne's book while creating your crease stencil or drawing the line. "Hold a mirror at your chin and look down into it," she explains. "By doing this you don’t blink and can see where your natural crease would be; you can draw the line above that so when you open your eyes you don't lose the liner in the fold."

How to Apply 1960s Style Eye Makeup THE IMPORTANCE OF MAKEUP There are numerous ways to check well-groomed and wonderful, one of which is makeup. With the best makeup, you can instantly become younger than five years. You can look more attractive to you. Of course, when applying makeup, we must perhaps not apply any solution we find to the face instantly, and the quality of the merchandise you will use within that path must be paid attention to, and even the sweetness specialists should really be called for step-by-step study on this subject. We should perhaps not exaggerate the day-to-day make-up built through the day and provide it an all natural look therefore that individuals maintain the health and strength of the make-up or if we would choose a simple makeup for the night make-up, it may cause the face area to appear older or light for this. You are able to stability it and show your style.

When we do it by watching some rules in make-up, we could achieve a more beautiful and organic search, because of this, the make-up must be a full, including along with of the apparel worn. The type of make-up that’ll suit a sports hair with a sports wardrobe should be simple and also merely a mascara on the face area will undoubtedly be enough. The most crucial makeup fashion to be viewed with a classic dress will be to look closely at more information and to highlight beauty with better strokes. On special occasions and nights, the significance of make-up raises once more and you intend to collect all the eyes on you for this, apparent make-up should be manufactured and details should be given interest, therefore you can have a more desirable and cool look.

For a beautiful make-up, first of all, the manufacturers and products and services applied is highly recommended, and the merchandise that do not flow, don’t movement and don’t vanish spontaneously must be held in the foreground and also normal cosmetics and make-up products and services should be much more preferred. This way, you will equally defend your skin health and ensure that the makeup on the facial skin looks more desirable and attractive.

How To Make Up The Experience
In face make-up, you need to first moisturize your face and have the make-up foundation on see your face, which you get from the absolute most obviously organized brands. Then, you can use a slim coating of BB cream to your relaxed and moistened face. Before performing this process, you ought to await your make-up sponge in warm water and use it to your face with bumper actions after it grows. Following the BB treatment method is finished, you should use a dark product solution to the areas you want to decrease inward on see your face with the help of a sponge. These areas usually are temples, under cheekbones and under chin. Afterwards, you are able to apply a detention concealer with a shin and whiteness to the areas you want to light up and get underneath the eye. You need to apply exactly the same process to the face, nose and lip. After you’re completed with cream items, we use your make-up with a clear dust for fixing.

In order to keep the breaks you use lasting, you conduct the method by drawing the quantity 3 on your face as if you’re using the same top-up with a two-tone darkish dust from your own skin. A short while later, you are nearly at the conclusion of your face makeup. Ultimately, the only real solution remaining from the powder applications you will affect your face is to increase the lighting of that person, and it will end with a spotlight method you will use on the nose, lip, forehead and chin.

How exactly to Make Eye Make-up
After you finish your skin makeup, you begin your attention makeup. You moisturize your vision having an eye base. Afterward you move over with a cream-colored headlight. Because it is just a day-to-day make-up, you switch to the final end of your eyelid with still another brown darkness blending brush. After moving a thin eyeliner, you deliver it with the aid of your finger. You add a bright eyeliner in to your eyes to create that person look brighter and more dynamic through the day.

As a final therapy, load your brows with the exact same shade of eyebrow huge difference or pen and complete your eye makeup. You can use a light sparkle to your lip and end your makeup. When you do these measures everyday, weakness may arise on your own face. Because of this, you should truly remove all make-up on your face at night and do plenty of moisturizing.

How to Apply 1960s Style Eye Makeup

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

1960’s Makeup Tutuorial- You’ll thank us next your dancing in Hairspray or Sweet Charity!

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

There is nothing that matches the classic yet pretty look of the 60’s. With the coming winter season, everyone is trying on with different styles either with their attire or their personal looks and there’s nothing better than a good and nicely done 60’s make over. The main thing about the 60’s look is the 60’s style eye makeup which makes you look like a complete stunner if you have done it the perfect way. The 60’s style eye makeup is definitely the trend of the season and here is the easiest way for you to try 60’s style eye makeup and look gorgeous this winter season.

Start your 60’s style makeover by cleaning your face and washing it with a good quality face wash. Pat it dry. Once you are done with the cleaning part, make you’re your eye area, where the makeup is supposed to be applied is clean and dry. For the 60’s style eye makeup, get a grab on the darkest shades of black for your eye liner or eye pencil. It is totally perfect to use any one of these products. The eye liner can be in gel form too. Starting with the 60’s style eye makeup, choose a light colored eye shadow because using a dark eye shadow is not the thing for 60’s style eye makeup.

Moving on to the eye lash line, pick your favorite dark colored eye pencil or eye liner and start applying it along your lash line. Keep your hand steady and firm. If you cannot keep it steady, use a gel eye liner instead of a liquid one. Now repeat this application once more so that you can enhance the shape of your eye by giving it a complete 60’s style eye makeup. Moving towards the end of the lash line, make the eye liner or pencil thicker. This is where you actually give your eyes the 60’s style eye makeup. If you want to make this look of 60’s style eye makeup more glamorous, apply false eye lashes.

As for the mascara, use the color black. Apply it on your eye lashes. After you are done with the mascara, you can balance out the whole look if you see any problem according to your style. A lash curler at this stage will also do the trick. Curl you lash, but keep in mind, do NOT smudge your eye liner. You can also do retouching on the eye liner edges if you think it is not enough. Make sure the edges of your lash line are going smoothly with your 60’s style eye makeup because we do not want it to be too artificial.

When it comes to 60’s style eye makeup, it is important that you work on the rest of your makeup too. This does not mean that you should over do the rest of the makeup. Remember to keep everything else very simple. For example use a good quality pinkish lipstick that also compliments your skin tone. Use a very light toned blush on and do not over do on this part.

Follow the above mentioned simple tips, and add glamour to your winter season by looking classic yet sexy by trying the 60’s style eye makeup.

Look glamorous this winter season by trying the 60’s style eye makeup. The 60’s style eye makeup gives you the most feminine and classic look by adding an extra spice too.

There is nothing that matches the classic yet pretty look of the 60’s. With the coming winter season, everyone is trying on with different styles either with their attire or their personal looks and there’s nothing better than a good and nicely done 60’s make over. The main thing about the 60’s look is the 60’s style eye makeup which makes you look like a complete stunner if you have done it the perfect way. The 60’s style eye makeup is definitely the trend of the season and here is the easiest way for you to try 60’s style eye makeup and look gorgeous this winter season.

Start your 60’s style makeover by cleaning your face and washing it with a good quality face wash. Pat it dry. Once you are done with the cleaning part, make you’re your eye area, where the makeup is supposed to be applied is clean and dry. For the 60’s style eye makeup, get a grab on the darkest shades of black for your eye liner or eye pencil. It is totally perfect to use any one of these products. The eye liner can be in gel form too. Starting with the 60’s style eye makeup, choose a light colored eye shadow because using a dark eye shadow is not the thing for 60’s style eye makeup.

Moving on to the eye lash line, pick your favorite dark colored eye pencil or eye liner and start applying it along your lash line. Keep your hand steady and firm. If you cannot keep it steady, use a gel eye liner instead of a liquid one. Now repeat this application once more so that you can enhance the shape of your eye by giving it a complete 60’s style eye makeup. Moving towards the end of the lash line, make the eye liner or pencil thicker. This is where you actually give your eyes the 60’s style eye makeup. If you want to make this look of 60’s style eye makeup more glamorous, apply false eye lashes.

As for the mascara, use the color black. Apply it on your eye lashes. After you are done with the mascara, you can balance out the whole look if you see any problem according to your style. A lash curler at this stage will also do the trick. Curl you lash, but keep in mind, do NOT smudge your eye liner. You can also do retouching on the eye liner edges if you think it is not enough. Make sure the edges of your lash line are going smoothly with your 60’s style eye makeup because we do not want it to be too artificial.

When it comes to 60’s style eye makeup, it is important that you work on the rest of your makeup too. This does not mean that you should over do the rest of the makeup. Remember to keep everything else very simple. For example use a good quality pinkish lipstick that also compliments your skin tone. Use a very light toned blush on and do not over do on this part.

Follow the above mentioned simple tips, and add glamour to your winter season by looking classic yet sexy by trying the 60’s style eye makeup.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

There is nothing that matches the classic yet pretty look of the 60’s. With the coming winter season, everyone is trying on with different styles either with their attire or their personal looks and there’s nothing better than a good and nicely done 60’s make over. The main thing about the 60’s look is the 60’s style eye makeup which makes you look like a complete stunner if you have done it the perfect way. The 60’s style eye makeup is definitely the trend of the season and here is the easiest way for you to try 60’s style eye makeup and look gorgeous this winter season.

Start your 60’s style makeover by cleaning your face and washing it with a good quality face wash. Pat it dry. Once you are done with the cleaning part, make you’re your eye area, where the makeup is supposed to be applied is clean and dry. For the 60’s style eye makeup, get a grab on the darkest shades of black for your eye liner or eye pencil. It is totally perfect to use any one of these products. The eye liner can be in gel form too. Starting with the 60’s style eye makeup, choose a light colored eye shadow because using a dark eye shadow is not the thing for 60’s style eye makeup.

Moving on to the eye lash line, pick your favorite dark colored eye pencil or eye liner and start applying it along your lash line. Keep your hand steady and firm. If you cannot keep it steady, use a gel eye liner instead of a liquid one. Now repeat this application once more so that you can enhance the shape of your eye by giving it a complete 60’s style eye makeup. Moving towards the end of the lash line, make the eye liner or pencil thicker. This is where you actually give your eyes the 60’s style eye makeup. If you want to make this look of 60’s style eye makeup more glamorous, apply false eye lashes.

As for the mascara, use the color black. Apply it on your eye lashes. After you are done with the mascara, you can balance out the whole look if you see any problem according to your style. A lash curler at this stage will also do the trick. Curl you lash, but keep in mind, do NOT smudge your eye liner. You can also do retouching on the eye liner edges if you think it is not enough. Make sure the edges of your lash line are going smoothly with your 60’s style eye makeup because we do not want it to be too artificial.

When it comes to 60’s style eye makeup, it is important that you work on the rest of your makeup too. This does not mean that you should over do the rest of the makeup. Remember to keep everything else very simple. For example use a good quality pinkish lipstick that also compliments your skin tone. Use a very light toned blush on and do not over do on this part.

Follow the above mentioned simple tips, and add glamour to your winter season by looking classic yet sexy by trying the 60’s style eye makeup.

Learning how to apply makeup seems easy enough, but sometimes, beauty basics can be pretty darn baffling. Luckily, eye shadow isn’t as intimidating as it seems, and it can totally transform your beauty routine.

“Eye shadow can do wonders for drawing attention to the eyes. Depending on color choice, intensity and placement, it can provide shape and balance to the face and make your eye color pop,” said Glamsquad artistic director, Kelli J. Bartlett.

Whether you’re looking for some insider eye shadow application tips, the best shade for your eye color or the right tools to get you started, we’ve got you covered. TODAY Style consulted makeup pros to learn everything you need to know about mastering the art of eye shadow.

Make sure to stock up on quality makeup brushes before applying eye shadow. Getty Images

Eye shadow brushes 101

Before even attempting to master eye shadow application, you’ll want to arm yourself with the proper tools to get the job done. A good set of makeup brushes can make a world of difference, and can help you get a smooth, professional finish. But when it comes to eye shadow, there’s really no one-size-fits-all list of brushes you should own. That’s because the tools you use will depend on the look you’re trying to create.

“Eye shadow can be applied in a multitude of different ways, depending on how you want the finish to look. If you want the look to be soft and diffused, choose a fluffy brush. For more detail or higher saturation, choose a densely bristled brush to help apply shadow with specificity. For high-shine metallic formulas, your finger can be an excellent tool to burnish on shadow,” said Bartlett.

If you’re not quite ready to get fancy yet and are just starting your eye shadow brush collection, here are some good tools to look for:

  • A blending brush to help create a seamless look between different colors
  • A flat, small dense brush to hold plenty of color
  • A spare brush for when you’re applying multiple colors at once

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

When to apply eye shadow in your routine

Once you’re ready to work some eye shadow magic, the question remains: Should you apply your eye makeup before or after foundation? It’s all personal preference, really, but taking care of your eye makeup looks first can save you a bit of cleanup later.

“When applying eye shadow I suggest applying the eye shadow first before you apply foundation to avoid the fallout. First apply a thin layer of eye shadow primer, then eye shadow and eyeliner where you desire,” celebrity makeup artist Billie Gene said.

Applying eye shadow first can also help if you’re creating a pretty intense look. “If you are looking to create a smokey eye or vibrant look then it is a good idea to start with your eyes in case you make any mistakes or have eye shadow fallout,” said Claudia Soare, president and creative director of Anastasia Beverly Hills.

If you’re more experienced and prefer to take care of your concealer and foundation first, you can always save eye shadow for later. “Just put some translucent powder onto a brush or pad and dab it under your eyes. Make sure to apply enough powder, so that if there is any eye shadow fallout it lands on the translucent powder. Then you sweep it off when finished,” said celebrity makeup artist Desirae Cherman.

How to apply eye shadow

There are many different ways to apply eye shadow and, with practice, you’ll develop a few shortcuts of your own to help achieve the look you’re craving. But there are a few basic tips that can get you started.

Prepping for eye shadow application:

  1. Prep the skin: “I like to wipe the eye area down with micellar water before I start makeup to remove anything that could be on the face. Oil is your enemy, as is anything slippery on the lid,” said celebrity makeup artist Mary Irwin.
  2. Start with an eye shadow primer: “It’s good to set your eye shadow by starting with a primer. This helps to not only hold the shadow in place, but also preps the eyelid, getting rid of discoloration,” Cherman said.
  3. Concealer: Still have some dark spots? Irwin recommends using a neutralizing concealer to create a totally clean canvas.
  4. Set the eye shadow: Bartlett recommends finishing with translucent setting powder dusted over the look.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Basic eye shadow application:

  1. Use an eye shadow the color of your skin all over, from lashes to brows.
  2. Follow up with a neutral color all over the lid up to the crease (you can use a matte or satin finish)
  3. Add dimension with a slightly darker color in a matte finish to the outer corner of the crease and blend well.
  4. Add an eyeliner of your choice.
  5. Take a highlighter or shimmery eye shadow lighter than your skin tone on the inner corner of the eyes to brighten things up.

Expert eye shadow application tips:

  • Want to add depth and dimension? Bartlettrecommends using a small flat brush and dark shadow pressed into where the lashes grow.
  • Want to make an area stand out more? Use a lighter color. “You can also use multiple colors to create varying levels of dimension,” Cherman said.
  • Want to add more intensity? Gene suggests applying loose shadow with a slightly damp brush.
  • Consider your eye shape! “If you have hooded eyes, you want to create the appearance of depth and a crease. You would add eye shadow just above the fold of the eye, to give a pushed back appearance. If you have more round eyes you want to soften a little and create a wider look. You would use eyeliner to draw along the lash line and push just based the outer edge,” Cherman said.
  • Bartlett suggests using a fluffy brush and a windshield wiper motion to apply color all over the eye.

Eye shadow for your eye color

Knowing how to apply eye shadow is great and all, but figuring out which hues complement your eye color is a whole other matter.

“To enhance your eye color, you want to use shades that are opposite. For instance, if your eyes are blue then use warmer shades with hints of orange or coral. If you have brown eyes use blue shades, and if you have green eyes use violet shades,” Soare said.

Whether you’ve got baby blues or gorgeous green eyes, the following eye shadow colors will help you emphasize your best asset:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

The 1960s were influenced by what was called “The London Look”. London based stars took the scenes and became the face of 60s fashion, makeup, and beauty. Notable faces of the 60s being London based models; Lesley Lawson and Jean Simpson.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Other stars of the 1960s who influenced makeup fashion were Elizabeth Taylor in her Cleopatra role, Brigitte Bardot and Aubrey Hepburn. Feminism, Afro, and Hippie culture were also notable factors that affected makeup fashion.

The major focus of the 1960s makeup were the eyes, while the rest of the face retained a natural ‘baby doll’ look and what was called the Bronze look.

Baby Doll Look

How to apply 1960s style eye makeupThis look was synonymous with the girly look of the 60s. It laid emphasis on a pale, almost white natural face powder and mild pink blush, long false top and bottom eyelashes, colorful and glittering eye shadows, dark-winged eyeliners, and natural neat arched eyebrows. The lips were usually nude or pink to give the perfect baby pout look.

Bronze Look

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Unlike the baby doll look that was all girly and feminine, the bronze look was loud. This look was essentially meant to glow and give the face a dramatic modern appeal.

The facial powder was meant to match the skin tone, while the blush was light brown and had glitters to highlight the cheekbones, nose, and chin. Eye shadows were dark; pinks, greens, blues, reds, etc, with dark winged eyeliners, false lashes, and full arched eyebrows. Lipsticks were in colors that popped like deep pink, peach, red, and shimmer.

Twiggy

How to apply 1960s style eye makeupLesley Lawson, popularly known as Twiggy is a model, singer, and actress who came into the global limelight in the 1960s when she began her modeling career at the age of 16. She became a fashion icon while she worked closely with Mary Quant who popularized the Chelsea Look which was modeled by Twiggy.

Twiggy modeled miniskirts, dresses, and braless fashion which were considered to be scandalous at the time and that quickly brought her to the cover page of many magazines.

How to do Makeup like Twiggy in the 60s

How to apply 1960s style eye makeupTwiggy was the pioneering face of the Modernist look of the 60s. The mod look was considered the look of the youth with black and white eye shadows and black eye crease.

Mary Quant and Yardley were instrumental in the development of the Mod look with their affordable, colorful, and bold makeup products.

To get the perfect Twiggy look:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

  • Eyebrows have to be as natural as they can be; after grooming, shaping, and defining, light eyebrow pencils could be used.
  • Top and bottom eyelashes should be painted with eyeliner, and short false lashes used on the top and bottom. Also emphasizing a natural baby doll look.
  • The mod eye shadow look of Twiggy was gotten by applying a black eye shadow along the line of the socket crease and pale lid color. White was also used alternatively.
  • She often stuck with a pale natural shade face powder foundation.
  • Lips were along with the baby doll trend; nude, light pink, and glossy.

The 1960s paved the way for modernity in the beauty and fashion world. The nipped-in waist and full-skirted silhouettes that graced catalogs were replaced by sleek figures, psychedelic prints and bold colors. Perhaps the most iconic staple of the 60s was Twiggy’s eye makeup. Nothing in the eye region was spared: aqua blue eye shadow and winged eyeliner on the top and bottom eyelids, paired with voluminous falsies. Face makeup was kept simple to draw all eyes to, well, the eyes.

These mod makeup trends have resurfaced onscreen and on the red carpet. From Lily Collins at the 2019 Met Gala to Maddy Perez in the TV series Euphoria, daring eye makeup is all the craze in the new roaring 20s. While these looks may seem intimidating to pull off, here are three basic eye makeup ideas from the 1960s and how to master them.

One of the most iconic features of 1960s makeup is the mod cut crease. While today’s smoky eye look emphasizes the crease by dusting a darker eye shadow shade and blending it with a light base color, the cut crease abandons blending altogether. Instead, a dark arch is drawn over the crease to emphasize the depth of the eyes.

For a classic cut crease, identify your crease which should be the arch along your eye socket. Dust a light base color on your eyelids until you reach the crease. Then, use a black liquid eyeliner, such as T.S.W’s Pen Eye Liner, and carve an arch from the inner corner of the eye, along the crease, to the outer corner of the eye. Gradually apply pressure so the line becomes thicker towards the outer corner. Apply a small amount of the previous base eye shadow on the brow bone to further emphasize the line.

For a subtler, toned-down look, swap out the liquid eyeliner for a pencil eyeliner, such as MACQUEEN’s The Big Waterproof Gel Liner whose pigments are easy to blend. Opt for a brown pencil eyeliner and lightly smudge it until you’re comfortable with the line’s definition.

The 60s look wouldn’t be complete without the signature blue eye shadow. This controversial eye shadow color has been met with both fear and welcome arms. Today, it’s more welcomed than feared. While bold colors are usually a gamble, they go a long way when correctly utilized.

For a simple eye shadow-centric look, pick a vibrant shade and blend it all over your eyelid. Feel free to create a gradient look by blending it out near the outer corners of the eyes. Top it off with some volumizing mascara!

To emphasize a cut crease, opt for a pastel shade, such as baby blue or lilac. Kanebo’s Media Grade Color Eyeshadow offers a wide range of colors, from light dusty shades to bold pigments, for a myriad of 1960s eye shadow looks!

If you look through the photos of models and actresses in the 1960s, long and dramatic lashes were a centerpiece for makeup. Whether natural, falsies or drawn on, doll lashes spice up any look for a dash of adventure.

To recreate this look, coat your top and bottom lashes with a lengthening or volumizing mascara to flaunt what you already have! romand’s Han All Fix Mascara ensures that lashes stay curled all day, while HOLIKA HOLIKA’s Magic Pole Mascara 2X thickens and lengthens every lash without weighing them down.

For special occasions, amp up your look with some false eyelashes, such as Lactacia’s False Eyelashes. If you want to go all out, use a liquid eyeliner to draw eight to ten fake lashes under your bottom lash line.

About this blogger

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Joyce is on an odyssey to traverse the ever-changing beauty and fashion landscape. Growing up with family members who don’t look at labels before using the products, she is breaking this cycle by educating herself with the newest beauty and skin care products. She also strives to leave behind her signature fashion palette (blue, brown, black and more black), one step at a time. You’ll never find her NOT checking social media for the latest trends.

Are you trying to recreate the trendy vintage look that was quite rampant in the 1960s? Read the below tutorial to get some tips about the makeup of the era.

1960 – Beginning of a revolution

The 1960s saw a tremendous change in the attitude of the youth. It could be called the quintessential youth-oriented decade as more and more of them emerged out of their shells and defined the decade as their own.
The makeup trends also saw a huge change during this era. The au naturel look of the hippie tribe and the dramatic eyes of the modern and highly-fashionable brigade were to be seen in the youth and while these two extremities of makeup trends were rampant, pastel colors gained popularity in both these makeup trends.

Read on further to know in detail about what influenced the makeup styles and the color palettes in the 1960s. The false eyelashes came with a bang in this period. Lets read all about it.

Influence on Makeup

Towards the end of the 1950s, the youth had started emerging as self-dependent and also had some disposable income at their hands to spend it on makeup and fashionable clothes. To look stylish had become an important need by then and apparently, everyone had started spending on stylish products.

To cater to the growing demand of the youth, many new stores selling fashion products emerged all over especially in high-end streets such as Carnaby Street and Kings Road in London. This highly fashionable look was at its peak from 1964 to 1967. Many youth-oriented television shows, films, and magazines showcased young actors and actresses wearing a very fashionable look impacting the youth all over.

Model Twiggy created a rave in those days with her signature white eyeshadow and black crease look. This along with bold geometric patterns in apparel was seen trending amongst the youth.

The hippie culture in the late 1960s emerged with a very different taste in makeup. The hippie girl or guy appeared with a more natural looking face. They used more natural products and instead used a lot of accessories such as floral bracelets, flower headbands, and floral scarfs. The hippie or the flower child culture was a vast contrast to the mod fashion look in the 1960s.

The makeup trends in 1960s started with the continuation of the 1950s look. The makeup trends in the 1950s mostly consisted of a flicked upper eyeliner, a matte eyeshadow, mostly in shades such as green, blues and greys, and lipsticks ranging from soft red colors to light pinks and corals.

In the 1960s, the eyeshadow of the 1950s was replaced by a distinctive pale lid with dark eyeshadow crease. The lipstick of the 1950s gave way to pale lips to match the pale eyeshadows. Pastel colors created a riot in the makeup trends and younger women carried pastel colors from their ensemble to their makeup.

The eyes were the main focus of the high-fashion makeup trend of the 1960s. The rest of the face had more natural hues, often pale. The accessory of the decade was false lashes. Almost everyone seemed to be wearing false lashes. Some fashionable girls even wore two sets of false eyelashes. False eyelashes were worn on both upper and lower eyelashes. These lashes were crafted from human hair, animal hair, and even synthetic materials. They often came in long strips and had to be cut. They only came in black or brown colors and could be decorated further with glitter or rhinestones for a bolder look.

Mascara saw a whole new invention in this era. Although invented in the late 1950s, it became popular now and was available in a tube with a wand applicator. Some of them were waterproof whereas some weren't. Lash curlers were also available but they were not as harmless and efficient as the ones we get today. If not applied properly, they could give you a nasty nip on the eyelid.

The eyeshadows came in powder form and they were basically in a matte finish. White eyeshadow, mostly worn by model Twiggy, became the rage but the other colors such as blue and green were worn as well. There was a fashionable dark crease line which was left in a definite form and was not smudged or blended. Today, this trend continues but in various shades and with a lot of blending.

The upper eye line, flicked out and winged up at the ends, continued from the 1950s into the 60s as well.
The eyebrows had seen a major change in trend in this era. They became more shaped, groomed and defined with a brow pencil. Model Twiggy had a tweezed lighter touch of her eyebrows while Elizabeth Taylor wore a heavier penciled look on her eyebrows during the 1960s. Both the styles were in trend.

Blush on the cheeks was more natural and soft in colors ranging from corals, pinks, and peach.

During this decade, the trend of applying the blush on the entire face came up instead of just applying it on the cheeks. The idea was to create a natural glow on the entire face. Blushes were also in a matte finish and free of glitter.

Corals, peaches, and pinks were the ruling colors of the decade and beige-pink nudes were also seen. The lips were not defined with a lip pencil and left natural and understated. Even the lipsticks had a matte finish.
Red, pinks, and browns were prevalent during the beginning of the decade but gave way to softer nudes and corals in the mid-60s. These colors re-emerged towards the end of the decade.

Want to create a blast from the past that your mom and grandma will admire? Copy these vintage eye makeup trends to be a 60s babe!

1960s Fashion and Makeup Icons

The 1960s was a decade of fashion icons who were known for their hair, their fashion, and their makeup, including eyes, lipstick, and blush. Twiggy, Aretha Franklin, and Elizabeth Taylor rocked the front pages after Marilyn Monroe's blonde hair and red lipstick closed out the 50s and set the standard high going into the next decade. The 60s was a time of go-go dancers, the Civil Rights Movement, and hippies. The age of peace was across the country and women preferred makeup that highlighted their natural glow but that also gave them big doe-like eyes. Although musicals from and about the time period highlight the importance of hair (Hair and Hairspray being two of them), it was also all about the makeup trends of the time.

It is easy to change a few makeup tricks you already do to create the perfect 1960s look. You probably already have everything you need! You can be a catch by copying the makeup trends of the chicks of the 60s. Check out these 15 tips for the best 1960s eye makeup.

Winged Eyeliner

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The 1960s are known for the eye makeup trends that came out of those years, one being the winged eyeliner. Much like cat eye style glasses, the cat eye wing eyeliner was the “it” makeup trend of the 60s. For this eye makeup, you will need liquid black eyeliner for the perfect line. It is easier to trace the shape you want and then fill in the rest. The thicker the line, the closer you are to being a regular 60s chick.

Winged eyeliner can also differ in the curve. A cat eye style is typically winged upwards. However, make the 60s makeup trend your own by changing the direction and the angle of the wing or keeping it straight.

Reflected Eye Liner

This trend was one popularized by Marilyn Monroe. To get this look, first apply eyeliner with a wing on the top. On the bottom do a similar wing (without connecting the two wings). You should start the wing only halfway across the bottom lid whereas the top liner extends across the entire lid. The bottom wing should then also run a little short of the top wing. It should look like the bottom wing is just a water’s reflection of the top wing.

Smoky Eyes

This is another popular modern trend that was born in the 60s, mostly thanks to Edie Sedgwick. Smoky eyes can be done one of two ways: an overall smoke or an ombre-effect smoke. To get the overall smoke, use a brush or a shadow blender to smudge a dark shadow across your entire eyelid. You can go for a subtle smoke, which would cover only the eyelid, or a heavy smoke that extends to the eyebrow.

To get the ombre-effect smoke, dab a dark shadow on the outer corner of your lid and then blend, working your way into the inner corner, blending less and less as you go. To get the full smoke effect, also blend a thinner line of dark shadow on your bottom lid.

Heavy Bottom Lid Liner

Almost as much as 60s girls liked heavy mascara and a heavy line of eyeliner on the top lid, they also like a dark, heavy line on the bottom lid. You can either have a defined line, like Elizabeth Taylor, or you can smudge the line slightly for a more smoky look. Regardless, the liner on the bottom should be less thick than the liner on the top to ace this look.

Under-Eye Lines

Twiggy was famous for this trend. Not only did she use heavy mascara and dark lines of eyeliner both on the bottom and top lids but she also used a makeup technique that mimicked the look of heavy mascara on the bottom eyelashes, but because those lashes aren’t as long, she created these lines using eyeliner. Genius!

White Eye Pencil

After the 50s when Marilyn’s semi-closed sensuous eyes were being replaced by Twiggy’s doe-like eyes, everyone wanted to follow. However, not everyone was born with their gifted genetics. To get the same look without the same eye size, use a white eyeliner. Put a thin line on the waterline of the upper lid before your black eyeliner. Repeat on the bottom waterline. Then apply your black eyeliner as normal, making sure to not cover up the white line.

The decade of the 1960s gave us Twiggy in a miniskirt, the first lady’s pillbox hat, Mia Farrow’s super short hair, mods and hippies. Hair spanned great lengths, and popular styles included voluminous, teased hair, afros, long and straight hair (the hippie look) as well as hair trimmed short in the shape of a pixie cut.

But it wasn’t just the hairstyle that framed the face.

If there’s one thing you take away about the ’60s look, let it be this: Don’t be shy about the eyes. The eyes were the No. 1 focus throughout ’60s style. Elizabeth Taylor starred as Cleopatra in the early ’60s, and her queen of the Nile eyes had an impact on makeup trends across the United States. American women preferred their eyes dramatically made up, and colorful eye shadows — including bold blues and greens — black liquid eye liners and false eyelashes (which first became popular in the ’60s) were all part of a well-stocked make-up kit. Eyes were completely lined in black, with lines swooping out from the eye, toward the temple (the ultimate cat-eye). And eye shadows were applied with a heavy hand, from lashes to brows. Eyebrows were full, dark and extended, with strong, emphasized arches.

In addition to the Cleopatra-inspired look, Twiggy, Edie Sedgwick and the mod scene influenced American makeup trends with dramatic Bambi eyes and pale, matte or nude lips. Reds and dark lipsticks were passé throughout the decade, except for during the very early ’60s, but consider that a little style spillover from the ’50s. In the late 1950s, titanium was introduced into makeup, creating pearly, shimmering lipsticks and nail polishes. These pearly pinks and peaches gained popularity in the ’60s. Translucent makeup powders were also introduced during this time, and Max Factor’s pancake makeup continued to be popular in the ’60s as well. Faces were, as in the 1950s, flawless and matte.

By the end of the decade, the natural look was beginning to gain popularity, especially in the young, hippie generation. This natural look focused on soft colors, healthy golden skin and flushed cheeks, and became one of the defining looks of the 1970s.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

If you’ve ever admired retro photos of Twiggy or Brigitte Bardot, you’ll love this style of makeup.

There are several key components that make up this style – it’s more than just a heavy, sweeping line of mascara.

Here are the five steps you’ll need to follow if you want to achieve an authentic ’60s makeup look…

Start with a pale base

Pale skin was it in the ’60s, so put that bronzer away.

Use your favourite medium to full coverage foundation to create a bright and flawless base.

A natural-looking finish is best, so the likes of the Make Up For Ever Ultra HD Foundation is perfect.

Go in light with the blusher

Sixties makeup is all about the eyes, so keep your face makeup very minimalistic.

Just dab on a small amount of a muted pink cream blusher to your cheeks to give you a natural-looking flush.

Cream blusher gives a more natural finish than powders, and the Rosie for Autograph Cream Blush in Natures Blush at M&S will give you the subtle hue you require.

Eyeshadow tricks

Prepare your eyes by covering the lid with a nude flesh-toned shadow to neutralise any redness and create a neutral base, or, if you have Benefit Cosmetics Air Patrol BB Cream Eyelid Primer, even better.

If you want something more dramatic, use a white eyeshadow instead. Then, trace your crease with a dark brown or black shadow, or a black eyeliner if you want to make more of a statement.

Line your eyes

Practice your liquid eyeliner skills, as it was all about a thick black line across your top lashes in the ‘60s.

Then, add a thinner line along your bottom lashes too.

The Illamasqua Precision Ink Liner in Abyss is as black as you can get and it has a long thin tip to help you create sharp lines.

Fake lash it

Glue false strip lashes across your top lash line.

Choose the fullest, blackest and most ‘Bambi-like’ ones you can find.

Finally, draw on some statement bottom lashes with a black eyeliner in short, straight strokes.

Laura Pearson-Smith is founder and blogger at fashion, beauty and lifestyle blog A Life With Frills.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

The 1960s was an era of change. The decade threw prior notions of female posterity and modesty to the wind, which gave us trends like mini skirts and beautiful eye makeup. Neutral tones and delicate cat eyes were traded for pastel colors and bold eyeliner. Although the era’s influence has long lingered in modern-day trends, ‘60s eye makeup looks have recently been coming back in full force.

I first took stock of the ‘60s eye makeup revival while scrolling TikTok (#modmakeup currently has over 1.9 million views). All of a sudden, my feed became an endless array of floating eyeliner and Jean Shrimpton makeup tutorials. Then I started noticing the beauty style on celebrities like Bella Hadid, Lily Collins, and Lucy Boynton. And, TBH, it makes sense — the curtain bangs of the the 1960s bombshells have been all the rave this year, so makeup was sure to follow suit.

It’s a trend makeup artists are noticing, too. “I see the convergence of a couple of factors driving this renewed interest in the ‘60s aesthetic,” says Fatima Thomas, senior national artist at M.A.C. Cosmetics. One reason? The pandemic. “The ‘60s featured a strong emphasis on eye makeup, making it the perfect inspiration for mask-ready beauty,” she tells Bustle. The second factor has to do with the reemergence of society, she explains, and people wanting to embrace the newfound freedom outside of quarantine.

Before you hop into your cosmetic time machine, make sure you’re stocked with Q-tips, small liner brushes, and micellar water to delicately fix mistakes, says Jamie Dorman, celebrity makeup artist. Then you can have fun recreating four of the most iconic ‘60s eye makeup looks, below.

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1. Dramatic Bottom Lashes (aka ‘The Twiggy’)

The makeup look that’s most synonymous with the ‘60s is the dramatic bottom lashes made famous by women like Twiggy and Diana Ross. The doll-like glamour effect was achieved by painting on eyelashes underneath the eye.

When creating this at home, you’ll need a light eyeshadow color, dark eyeliner, mascara, and, depending on personal preference, individual false lashes. Dorman says the process begins by applying a light eye color all over the eyelid. Then, using a dark or bold eyeliner, draw a half-circle that goes around the eye socket. If the floating liner feels too dramatic, you can replace the socket outline with a more demure smear along the lash line.

The pièce de résistance of this look, however, is the lashes. Take your eyeliner of choice and “draw on the lower lashes towards the outer edge of the eye,” says Dorman. You can choose to draw them on uniformly or in descending size from outside the eye to the inner corner. The last part of the equation is mascara: “You want to use a lot of mascara for this look, preferably a volumizing formula,” she says. Once you’ve coated the top and the bottom lashes, you’re good to go.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

If you were lucky enough to have experienced ’60s makeup firsthand, then you probably know what a revolutionary time in beauty it was. Coined the “London Look,” ’60s mod makeup—from the word “modernist”—was trailblazed by quirky youth-targeted British stores in Carnaby Street, Kings Cross, and Portobello Road. Specifically, beauty brands Mary Quant and Yardley of London rode the mod wave and had super-popular models Twiggy and Jean Shrimpton model their products and showcase the now-iconic white shadow/black crease look that has since become the defining look of the era.

The birth of shows like Top of the Pops and the global success of The Beatles, Motown, and rock n’ roll also gave music a huge influence over pop culture and fashion trends. Famous Beatle girlfriend and model Pattie Boyd, singer Cher, and girl group The Ronettes also played a big part in defining ’60s makeup looks, with their penchant for graphic cat-eye liner, feathery, spiky eyelashes, and pale pink lips gaining a lot of traction in the mainstream.

These British invasion-inspired looks may be decades old, but chalk it up to the cyclical nature of beauty trends (or, hey, good old-fashioned nostalgia) and we’re now seeing a resurgence in retro ’60s eye makeup make the rounds, and unsurprisingly so. Our current situation as of late puts a lot of the spotlight on the eye area, and what throwback could be more fitting than the era of graphic liner and over-the-top lashes?

Another thing to note is the predilection towards a finished (mask-proof?) face, which, along with ’60s eyeliner, was also a big trend back in the day. What was then achieved via meticulously applied powder (it actually outdid sales of liquid and cream foundation during the Swinging Sixties) is now accessible via the best foundation innovations we have today, which can span the gamut from long-wearing liquid to pore-smoothing and nearly invisible.

Whether it’s graphic liner or pastel lids and lips, we’re all about that ultra-fun, groovy vibe, and best yet, any one of these looks are easily tweakable into a modern iteration sure to make a major statement.

Hair and Makeup of the 1960s

Hair and Makeup of the 1960s varied considerably; from the au naturel look of the Hippies to the bright and bold statement style of the Mod movement. Here we take a look at the influences behind the hair and makeup of the 1960s and how you can apply them to your everyday style.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

1960s Makeup

It was the youth who had the biggest influence on the hair and makeup of the 1960s. Since the 1950s they had disposable incomes ready to spend on looking fabulous! Women’s 1960s makeup began quite demurely with pastels and nudes that enhanced their natural beauty and was often seen on trend setters such as Jacqueline Kennedy. Glamorous, bouffant hair and pillbox hats often accompanied this natural look.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Jacqueline Kennedy’s early 1960s pastel makeup.

On the other side of the spectrum, and originating from London, was the more edgy, rebellious style of the Mod subculture. The demure look didn’t suit everyone and many girls favoured the Mod style immortalised by Twiggy; short hair, lashings of mascara and plenty of eye shadow! It was the eyes which were at the heart of 1960’s makeup.

To create this look, a bold white, blue or grey eye shadow would usually be applied to the lid and a dramatic cut crease was created by applying a dark eyes shadow or pencil liner along the crease of the eye.

Reigning supreme was thick, black liquid eyeliner on the lid while white pencil was used on the waterline to open up the eyes. Huge pairs of doll-like false lashes often followed. This was taken even further by Twiggy who used liquid liner to draw in individual lower lashes for a surreal effect. Plenty of mascara completed this look.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Twiggy applying Mod-style makeup.

Lips took a backseat in the 1960s. They were kept pale and some women even applied foundation over their lips to help them blend in with the rest of the face! Those who did wear lipstick stuck to colours that wouldn’t take the focus away from their eyes, such as pale pinks, corals and very subtle reds. However, daring Mods could sometimes be seen sporting white lipstick.

1960s Hair

It was Jacqueline Kennedy, America’s First Lady, who gave the 1960’s bouffant hair it’s iconic status. It was thought to be the perfect style as it always looked so glamorous and women all over the world would be seen with this big, fabulous hair.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Jacqueline Kennedy’s Bouffant hair.

From 1964 onward the younger generation added their own twist to the bouffant hair which is known as the Beehive.

The Beehive is an enduring symbol of the 60s. This glamorous up do was the most popular hair style and was often seen on celebrities such as Audrey Hepburn, Dusty Springfield and Bridgette Bardot who wore a half up, half down Beehive. This hair style wasn’t easy to achieve and required a lot of styling. At night before bed, girls would set their hair in very large rollers using a gel solution to achieve the sky-high hair this look called for. Some girls with extremely curly hair would use old grapefruit cans instead of rollers to set their locks.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

The girl group, The Ronettes and their Beehive hair.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Bridgette Bardot’s half up, half down Beehive.

Banned Apparel 1960s Collection.

For this AW16 Banned Apparel have introduced clothing, footwear and accessories from the 1960s. These have recently been on show at our recent trade shows and will be available at your nearest Banned Apparel retailer very shortly.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

The swinging sixties were amazing when it came to makeup. Everyone (at least the women!) loved makeup and it was characterized by the bold looks that most women sported during this era. Also 1960s was the age of Alfie and Twiggy and cat eyes were long forgotten. Mod makeup or short for ‘Modernist’ makeup was all about the lashes. Big, flapping lashes to look ultra-gorgeous and cute. Twiggy, the very famous model from the 1960s, made this look extremely popular and in fact, it is slowly coming back again!

Let’s give you a little round up of what the swinging sixties mod makeup was all about:

Mod Eye Makeup

Gone for the days of the cat eye and 60s women were concentrating more on their lashes now. This meant mod eye makeup had the eyeliner but this liner was doubled up as it neared the edges. False lashes were placed above and below the eye for a flapper effect.

Eye shadow: Blue, white and pale colours were the most important in any mod style makeup

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: youqueen.com

Powder: Powders were very crucial when it came to mod makeup looks. The translucent powder look that is popular right now was actually very important during the 1960s.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: sharonthemakeupartist.com

Lips: There wasn’t a lot of emphasis given on lips and mostly women wore pale colours or outlined their lips with red.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: popsugar-assets.com

Here we will tell you some of the best ways to recreate these iconic looks:

Twiggy Eyes And Lashes

Like we said before, Twiggy made her lashes very popular during the sixties and this is still an integral part of mod makeup, even today. To get this look, start by curling your lashes with mascara. Apply three coats of mascara to your bottom and top lashes. Now comes the difficult part: Take a tweezer and clump lashes together equally.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: realsimple.com

Big Hair, Don’t Care!

Big hair is very important for the 60s look. Most people during this time wore their hair big and their curls loose. To get this look, create loose curls for your hair. Now tease the middle of your hair and the sides, too, in order to create a lot of volume.

Now comb through the teased hair to smoothen it. Now use bobby pins to set those curls in place. Don’t forget to use a hair spritz to hold your hair in place!

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: xojane.com

Nude Lips

Besides the eyes, Mod makeup did not emphasize much on the lips and nude lips were the most popular during this time. Since big hair and eyes were important during this time, the 50s dark lips gave way to nude lips. Here, nude lips don’t really mean that your lips look like they don’t have anything on, instead the lips were actually the same colour as yours, but they were definitely enhanced. Creamy and with a little bit of sheen was all about the lips. One way to know whether you have nailed the nude lips look is to see whether the gums don’t look too dark or too light next to your lips.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: realsimple.com

Matte lipstick also works perfectly well with this look and if you want to see a celeb example of the mod makeup look, Lana Del Rey will be your example. Take a look at her recent mod makeup looks:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: wordpress.com

Mod makeup look is really back in vogue and if you want to try these looks, concentrate on the eyes and the hair. Your eyes and lashes should do all the talking and not to forget the big hair! Leaves those curls loose! It’s really these two features that bring out the most in any mod look. Remember, it isn’t that difficult! All you need is a little bit of guidance!

Scroll through beauty videos on Instagram or TikTok feed and you'll find at least one makeup look with a cut crease, graphic eyeliner, or dramatic lashes. As it turns out, '60s makeup has been having a major moment, and experts predict it isn't going anywhere in 2022.

Back in the day, '60s makeup was all about emphasizing the eyes via bold makeup looks, explains Dominique Lerma, the executive makeup artist at Omnia Brush. Just take a look at the icons of the era. Supermodel, Twiggy's notable eyelashes walked so that falsies of future decades could run. Diana Ross' bold, graphic winged eyeliner was a force to be reckoned with. And, of course, Elizabeth Taylor's bonafide bright blue eyeshadow.

We aren't surprised about this makeup revival. After all, good trends have a way of repeating themselves. We're seeing a slew of celebrities, influencers, and makeup artists fully embrace this trend — just take Ariana Grande wearing pastel cut creases while promoting her new makeup brand, for example. "I've seen a big makeup wave of '60s makeup throughout 2021, and it still feels like we're just getting started," says Ash K. Holm, a Los Angeles-based celebrity makeup artist.

Makeup artists believe that the comeback of '60s-inspired makeup is due to the pandemic. "I feel that because most of our faces have been partly covered with the masks, that putting extra TLC in eye makeup application is where the rise of '60s makeup trends comes from," says Lerma. Even once mask regulations let up in the summer of 2021, we saw an uptick in bright and bold makeup trends as people were going out again due to the vaccination and social-distancing restrictions that allowed restaurants and other businesses to open back up.

On top of the pandemic, there are also so much more makeup products that make playing with eye makeup more accessible, fun, and innovative than during the '60s. "It only makes sense that the '60s would make a comeback being as that there are so many creative ways you can use lashes and liner to express yourself," says Holm. Case in point: Lily Collins wore a "'60s French gamine eye" look, as Lerma calls it, during the season two screening of Emily in Paris. 

In 2022, this retro style will take a more modern spin that feels fresh and youthful, says Jamie Dorman, a Manhattan-based celebrity makeup artist. "The main difference between the '60s version and the current ones is texture," she says. "In the '60s, the only texture option was matte eyeshadow, but now we have a lot of varying texture options to choose from."

Lerma agrees and says there will also be a shift in the makeup application. "The difference of '60s eyeshadow application and now is that people are not gravitating towards bringing it up towards the brow bone, but rather are keeping eyeshadow application more refined, which in my opinion reads more timeless."

Holm says that the best way to create a beginner-friendly '60s makeup look is to do a graphic eyeliner choice with a negative-space cut crease. "One of my favorite ways to create a quick and easy '60s look is to create a curved floating line above your crease to give the illusion of wider, more deep-set eyes," she says.

When it comes to creating any graphic eyeliner look, Lerma says it's all about taking it slow. "I know creating a detailed graphic eyeliner look can feel overwhelming, but don't look at the whole staircase, take it a step at a time," she says. Instead of creating a line in one fell swoop, Lerma suggests placing small dots to outline the shape of your graphic eyeliner and then going in with an eyeliner brush to connect the dots. "You can later go back and add on thickness, an extended wing, or whatever you want," she says.

The right tools and products will also help make eyeliner application way easier. Lerma recommends the Omnia Brush Eyeliner Brush BOM-475 ($6, omniabrush.com) for its angled tip that offers exact precision. If you prefer an eyeliner with an applicator, Dorman recommends the Westmore Beauty Wing Effects Liquid Eyeliner ($21, amazon.com) for its ability to draw on precise lines.

VIDEO: 2022 Is Going to Be Sparkly, According to this Major Hair and Makeup Trend

As far as recreating '60s eyeshadow, don't be afraid to opt for a bright color. When it comes to application, Dorman says, "'60s eyeshadow emphasizes the round shape of the eye, so instead of using eyeshadow to wing out and lift the eye, use it to emphasize the socket shape."

And what's '60s makeup without dramatic lashes? Holm says to opt for a rounded wispy eyelash to help recreate that Twiggy-inspired look. The KISS My Lash But Better in Blessed ($5, ulta.com) is an affordable pick. "I also like to take another pair of lashes, cut them into individuals, and apply to the lower lash line to give a 60's Twiggy-like feel," she says.

Ultimately, if you look at history during the '60s, it was a period all about rebellion and revolution. So, the same rules apply in makeup — it's all about being fearless, experimental, and bold.

The beauty and makeup of the 1960s is making a comeback with countless TikTokers and Insta influencers. Boho hippie style is marked by dramatic cat eyes, fluffy lashes, and a pale understated lip. It was seen on every “it” girl of the time, from Twiggy as she nailed her model poses to Cher as she crooned “I got you, babe.”

The trickiest part is mastering the sharp eyelid crease, but lucky for us, there have been some upgrades to make modern applications even easier.

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Here’s what you’ll need to get a classic 1960s look:

  • a pale neutral (or colored) eyeshadow
  • black kohl or gel eyeliner and traditional liquid liner
  • black volumizing mascara OR fake lashes (consider a magnetic variety for easy application)
  • neutral/pale lip color

Get the Look

The great thing about this look is that it requires just a few steps. Start with a clean face, and don’t worry too much about blushes and bronzers. Feel free to use a bit if it makes you feel more confident, but in the ’60s, you could actually skip this step.

Eyeshadow

The palest, monochrome eye makeup tones were used in this time period to jaw-dropping effect. Be sure to begin with a primer or concealer on your eyelid for eyeshadow that lasts all day. Choose a white shade, or anything in the pale, neutral family. Consider using a cerulean blue or green, which gives a vintage vibe while still being on-trend.

Winged Liner

The ’60s trend aside, everyone these days is doing winged eyeliner. A little vintage and a little modern, it’s obvi a timeless staple because it looks good on nearly any eye shape.

The ’60s version is not a subtle one either. It’s a very heavy, thick line. To achieve the look, take your liquid liner and start drawing at the center of your upper lash line. Draw out and up beyond the outer corner of your eye. Then, from the tip of the wing, you will begin another line angled downward, back toward the eye, forming an empty triangle that you will fill in.

Of course, there are many ways to do this with hacks using everything from dental floss to credit cards or tape. So, if you find yourself looking a bit smudgy and hungover, experiment with various techniques.

Cut Crease

Next up is the cut crease, which is probably the most ’60s part of all. This is basically a very defined line drawn through your upper eyelid crease in the shape of a rainbow.

Begin by holding a mirror and looking down into it. You want to actually draw your line just above the crease for the illusion of bigger eyes. Make a dot at both ends of the crease and then one in the middle. Connect the dots using your gel or kohl liner. You can keep this line really defined or blend a bit. Finish off by lining your lower lash waterline in your standard black liner or try white for an eye-popping, psychedelic feel.

Hello again! After looking up some of the history of beauty in each decades I have chosen to go with the 1960s trends. Even when it’s heavily punctuated by radical social and political upheaval, the 1960s was an amazing decade. Women took their fashion and makeup inspiration from a variety of sources including the Hollywood icons such as Audrey Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor, Twiggy and blonde bombshell Bridget Bardot. What impact did these diversely different styles have on the makeup trends of the swinging 1960s? Let’s take a look!

1960s Makeup Trends

The 1960s were perfectly sandwiched between the classic, refined beauty of the 1950s and the gutsy, mod styles of the early 1970s. On one end of the beauty spectrum, ladies sought to emulate Jackie Kennedy’s impossible elegance with bouffant hair, pillbox hats and makeup that emphasized their natural beauty.

Conversely, others were more drawn to the edgy, rebellious nature of the Mod subculture. These women often sported stylishly short haircuts and highlighted their eyes to the extreme while downplaying the rest of the face.

And who could forget the sexy looks of Bridget Bardot? No matter which beauty theory the gorgeous ladies of the 1960s prescribed to, the decade’s emphasis was placed firmly on the eyes as the traditionally trendy red lips of the 40s and 50s fell out of fashion.

1.Face

The beginning of the 1960s saw women applying pale, cream foundations for a fabulously flawless face. A typical 1960s woman would then set her foundation with liberal application of a translucent powder to create a perfect matte finish.

However, as the decade progressed, Max Factor’s iconic Pan-Cake makeup became increasingly popular. The breakthrough formula, a foundation and powder in one, was applied to the face with a damp sponge to achieve a polished but natural complexion. This “less is more” is ideal for the rest of the decade with women avoiding the previously acceptable cakey look at all costs.

Much like today, 1960s girls relied on concealer to correct and conceal small blemishes and areas of redness.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

2.Cheeks

Believe it or not, blush was not a must in the 1960s. Those who did want to add a gentle flush of color to their cheeks generally opted for delicate, peachy colors. Other fashionable choices included the subtle use of soft rose and warm brown blushers. Powder was the most common formula though creams and liquid were also available. Blusher was applied in the shape of a narrow triangle beneath the cheekbones and in the hollows of the cheeks.

3.Eyebrows

Eyebrow trends have undergone a dramatic transformation throughout the decades as we know from our look at the 1920s and 1940s. In the 1960s, the english vogue look was well-groomed eyebrows, usually sculpted and defined with the use of a brow pencil. Some women chose to shave their inner brows completely only to fill them in more softly in short strokes.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

4.Eyes

The eyes were at the heart of 1960s makeup. For a classic, daytime look, many women copied Jackie Kennedy’s elegant eye makeup. Light matte and pastel colors on the lid, such as pale pink and champagne shadows, were popular. However, even women who preferred this natural look frequently opted for bolder blue and green eye shadows for evening engagements. Just like today’s makeup application, a taupe or soft brown shade was used in the crease to create definition. The brow bone was also highlighted, usually with a white matte eye shadow.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Often, eyeliner was applied close to the upper lash line and along the waterline to intensify the eyes and give the illusion of longer lashes before a generous amount of mascara was applied.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Of course, this demure look didn’t suit everyone. Some girls gravitated towards the Mod style immortalized by Twiggy. To create this look, a bold white, blue or grey eye shadow was usually applied to the lid. Next, a dramatic cut crease was created by applying a dark eyes shadow or pencil liner along the crease of the eye. This resulted in a sharp, graphic line that remained unblended.

Thick, black liquid eyeliner reigned supreme on the lid while white pencil was used on the waterline to open up the eyes. Often, huge pairs of doll-like false lashes followed. Twiggy took this step even further by using liquid liner to draw in individual lower lashes for a surreal effect. This intense look was completed with a lashing of mascara.

5.Lips

While the women of the 1960s emphasized their eyes, lips took a backseat. Some women even applied foundation over their lips to help them blend in with the rest of the face! Those who did wear lipstick stuck to colors that wouldn’t take the focus away from their eyes, such as pale pinks, corals and very subtle reds. However, daring Mods could sometimes be seen sporting white lipstick.

And there you have it! A little peek of our make up and trends during the old Hollywood times. To be honest I really do like the style and the make up and hair back then I just find it to be very classy and sophisticated, always nice to look at and never get’s boring!

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

The 1960s was the era which influenced a lot of makeup junkies. One decade of bold, beautiful makeup which is still inspiring beauty aficionados all around the world is this makeup. 60s mod makeup is very easy to mimic.

60s Mod Makeup

Twiggy was one model which inspired generations of people for the 60s mod makeup. In this article, we will teach you how to do mod 60s makeup and look like Twiggy in five easy steps. Read on to know more!

Twiggy’s 1960s mod makeup look can be summarized in this picture:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: photogriffon.com

The 1960s makeup was all about creating dramatic lashes and paying attention to your eyes. Lips were mostly left pale and translucent powder was used in abundance. Twiggy had short hair, but most of 60s mod hair styles included teased hair with loose and bouncy curls. Take a look at some of the most common hairstyles during the 60s:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: hairfinder.com

Some of the most popular hairstyles also included a hairband. Like these:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: hairworldmag.com

To achieve this kind of 1960s mod makeup look, we have broken it down with some easy steps for you.

1960s Eyes

1960s eyes were all about those big, flapping eyelashes. Cat eyeliner which was popular in the 1950s gave way to a different kind of eye lining technique. Here, the eyeliner was used to give a double line at the edge of the eye. Lashes were heavy on the mascara and for that even more 1960s look, you would need to clump eyelashes together. Make sure you carefully clump those lashes. Going too hard may actually damage them! So go slow!

Curl your lashes using three coats of mascara (Yes, the more the better) and then take a tweezer to clump the lashes together. The eye shadow used is black and the waterline is heavily lined with white kohl. Bright eyes were the thing for 1960s mod makeup.

Use a tweezer to clump your eyelashes together. Here’s how to do it:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: ytimg.com

Here is a step-by-step way on getting Twiggy’s eye makeup right:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: getpretty.com.au

1960s Lips

The lips in 1950s were all about making a bold statement, but in the 1960s, the lips took a back seat. This time, the lips were more about making a very subdued and subtle statement. Most of 60s women wore their lips in a very pale colour and nude shades were coming back with a bang. Pair your lips with a smoky eye shadow in black or brown to achieve that 1960s mod makeup for lips look.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: australianhairandbeauty.com.au

1960s Brows

Along with the winged eyeliner, your brows for the 1960s mod makeup should be extremely sharp and defined. Don’t over define them, but make sure you use the right kind of palette to give it a sharp and natural look. Use Anastasia Beverley Hills Eyebrow palette for that natural and defined look.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: blogspot.com

1960s Hair

Like we said before, ‘BIG HAIR, don’t care’ was the general attitude for most of the hairstyles in the 1960s. Jean Shrimpton’s hair was adored and mimicked by one and all. All it needed was a little bit of teasing around the crown and leaving it with loose curls. Smoothen out the hair towards the end and use a hair straightener to do so. At the end of styling your hair, spritz some setting spray or mousse to keep the hair in place.

One of the easiest looks to emulate is this one:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: xojane.com

Here are some more hairstyle ideas:

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Source: hairworldmag.com

60s Hippie Makeup

The 60s was the era of hippies and a lot of 60s makeup and 60s fashion was inspired through the hippie culture. The hippie makeup was a riot of colors with body and face painting. Take a look at some of the 1960s makeup that will give you the feels of hippie culture.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

source: pinterest.com

1960s Mascara And Eyelashes

One of the most iconic fashion accessory that emerged in the 60s is the false eyelashes. Made out of human hair, animal hair, etc., these eyelashes came in black and brown colors. A lot of them used glitter and rhinestones as well to decorate their eyelashes.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

source: pinterest.com

The 60s eye makeup was incomplete without the mascara.

1960s Eye Shadow

Another integral part of the 60s makeup trend was the use of eye shadows. Though a lot of different colors were used, white was the preferred color of choice. Now you know how to do the 60s eye makeup.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

source: pinterest.com

1960s Cheeks And Blusher

Makeup in the 60s also included the usage of blushers. The most in trend colors were pinks, coral and peach. They were available in different forms like cream, solid cakes, tube, etc.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

source: pinterest.com

1960s Retro Makeup

We all love the retro 60s makeup and often end up throwing a 60s theme party to indulge in our retro love. Check out some of the retro makeup looks that you can try out at your next party.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

source: pinterest.com

There you go! Your step by step guide on achieving that perfect Twiggy look in jiffy; it isn’t that hard if you follow the instructions!

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Just like with putting your wardrobe together, applying the perfect makeup for your role is a big part of having a successful day on set. As a Central Casting Background Actor, you have the opportunity to work on movies and TV shows set in a variety of time periods, including the 1960s in productions like The Wonder Years, Why Women Kill, and This is Us. While you should always use the information in your details when creating your looks, this 1960s makeup guide can help provide some inspiration.

1960s makeup overview

Early 1960s makeup was largely a continuation of late ‘50s styles with soft blush, red-pink lipstick, matte eyeshadow, winged eyeliner, and lots of powder. For most women, this was the basis for the standard look throughout the decade and tended to be favored by older generations when bolder modern styles became popular.

By the mid ‘60s mod and babydoll looks took over makeup trends, which revolved around bold eyes. Pastel eye shadow, black crease shadow, winged eyeliner, and heavy fake lashes with light blush and pastel pink lips were integral to these types of styles.

At the end of the decade the hippie look gained popularity, which focused on a more natural look of light brown mascara, clear lip gloss, and sparse blush and powder.

If you’re looking for inspiration to create your own looks, Twiggy, Diana Ross, Nancy Kwan, Diahann Carroll, and Brigitte Bardot were prominent trendsetters of the era.

Basic ‘60s makeup elements

Like with modern styles, there are a lot of elements that go into the perfect 1960s look, but the eyes were always the main focus.

Eyeshadow

Most eyeshadows were matte pastels, though some had an iridescent shimmer. It was popular to match your eyeshadow to your eye color, like green tones for green or hazel eyes. To make it a mod look, unblended black eyeshadow was applied in an arch to the crease line and paired with white or a pale eyelid color.

Eyeliner

The most popular eyeliner style was a fully lined eye in black with a winged upper lid. The mod look took this further by adding white liner behind the black on the upper lid or to wear white liner by itself on the lower lid. The more natural hippie eyeliner look was often just a lightly lined upper eye in black with no wings or embellishments.

Eyelashes and brows

Starting in the mid-1960s, fake eyelashes became one of the biggest style trends. They were usually worn on both the upper and lower lashes, sometimes even layered on top of each other for a fuller look. For those who opted for a more natural style, mascara came in a variety of colors, from standard black to pastel purple. While fake lashes may be authentic to a 1960s look, they may not be right for the production you’re booked on, so refer to your details before applying fake lashes.

Eyebrows were generally shaped and defined, though this ranged from naturally polished to heavily shaped and filled in.

Foundation, blush, and lipstick

While the 1960s began with matte foundation and heavy powders, styles trended to sheer looks allowing for a more natural base. The main goal of foundation and powder was to add a glow to the face while allowing the eyes to pop. Blush was applied sparingly under the cheekbone in pinks, corals, and peaches to add subtle definition.

Lipsticks ranged from reds and browns to pastel pinks and corals. Most lipsticks were matte, but sheen looks became more popular in the mid to late part of the decade.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Creating your own 1960s makeup look

Remember, you should always base your looks off of the information given in your details. Makeup can not only vary by year, location, and occasion, but by that production’s unique aesthetic. A 1960s neighbor in WandaVision won’t necessarily have the same look as a 1960s neighbor in For All Mankind, so always defer to your details and category when putting your makeup on for set. If the project you’re working on has aired episodes, looking at styles and color palettes from similar roles can also help provide inspiration for your own look.

It’s always easier to add than remove, so if you’re not sure how far to take a look, the makeup department will likely instruct you how to finish or polish your makeup on set with the products you bring with you.

Looking for more ‘60s inspiration? Check out our 1960s wardrobe guide and other decade looks in our wardrobe article category.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

In the 1960s, full, dramatic lashes surged in popularity. Women started applying mascara to both top and bottom lashes, and false lashes created a bold, wide-eyed effect. Colored lashes and those in a variety of lengths and thicknesses heightened the drama, even going to extremes with embellishments. Today, we still enjoy a similarly diverse range of options. While false lashes aren’t as common for daily use, they are still a fun way to subtly — or not-so-subtly — enhance one’s look.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

Natural ’60s Flair

To recreate a 1960s (think Twiggy) look with just mascara, curl lashes (try best-selling Shu Uemura Eyelash Curler), and then layer on a black, thickening formula like L’Oréal Paris Lash Paradise Mascara or Urban Decay Waterproof Perversion. Don’t comb through the lashes! This look is more authentic when lashes clump a little. For a more dramatic look on lower lashes, use a thin, black eyeliner to draw lashes on your skin (really!). Use something that won’t smear, like YSL Dessin Du Regard Waterproof Eyeliner Pencil.

Vintage Lash Queen

To go faux, try something like Urban Decay Perversion False Lashes or Kiss Lash Couture Faux Lash Extensions on just the tops or on both lashes. Finally, walk (or wink) on the wild side with the glamorous Ardell Mega Volume Lash.

1960- The Color Additive Amendment requires that colouring ingredients in cosmetics (as well as food and drugs) must be tested fro safety and approved by the FDA.
1962- Helena Rubinstein offers the first “Day of Beauty,” consisting of an exercise class, massage, lunch, facial, shampoo and hairstyling, manicure, pedicure, and makeup session—all for $35.
1963- Texan Mary Kay Ash spends her life’s savings to develop her skincare formula; six years and millions of dollars later, she rewards her top sales directors with pink Cadillacs.
first major cosmetics line designed especially for women of colour.
1965- The “pale look” is trendy—pale lips, no blush, bleached eyebrows, lots of dark eye shadow, mascara, and false eyelashes.
1965- Pablo– one of the first celebrity makeup artists –- introduces “fantasy” and “bizarre” eye looks incorporating jewels, flowers, and op art designs.
1966- London’s Mary Quant creates the mod look—lots of bold colours and geometric designs—in fashion and makeup.
1967- Estee Lauder launches Clinique, a company that downplays glamour and stresses “scientific” skincare. Salespeople wear lab coats, and products are packaged in antiseptic green.
1967- Supermodel Twiggy’s look is all the rage. She draws lashes around the eyes with a pencil and applies multiple layers of falsh lashes and mascara.
1968- African American model Naomi Sims appears on the cover of Life, and black models Bethann Hardison, Toukie Smith, Pat Cleveland, and Grace Jones hit the fashion runways in New York and Paris.
1969- Biba store opens in London, selling dramatic makeup in shades of purple, plum, and turquoise.

In 1961 girls blended shades of lipstick at home, but first blotted the lips with Max Factor Pancake makeup and white eyeshadow cream was one of the top sellers ( used for brightening eye sockets, but women later used it for highlighting or wrinkle-hiding). Eyes are the focus which were darkened using dark eyeshadow, liquid and kohl eyeliner, and mascara and were smudged on eyes in North America and Europe. The film Cleopatra with Elizabeth Taylor had very emphasised eyes and everyone learnt how to apply eyeliner and socket lines. Models Jean Shrimpton and Twiggy along with actress Julie Christie all had lined eye sockets that said Sixties Chick with chic. Young girls were frowned upon if they wore red lipstick so they used softened pink and peach colours which were acceptable to parents, but then became a trend. At the end of the decade it was the no makeup look. Lips became paler until girls could go no paler using white lipstick and would do no lighter. Cosmetics by Mary Quant brought out cosmetics that were great and affordable like the cheek contour shaders and highlighters. She encouraged users to use brushes to apply eyeliner and blusher to achieve a hollow cheek, wide eyed look like Twiggy. She made out leaflets with diagrams of the look. Her trademark is the Quant daisy logo. Psychedelics did the fantasy eye make-up with heavy white and black lines. The hipppy movements had natural wild looks and rejection of cosmetics. Face and body painting was also done. Veruschka, America’s top surrealist model got covered in flowers and Twiggy liked daisies.
If you want to use the look today you can use eyeshadows ranging from grey to black, eyeliner such as liquid, kohl and creamy pencil and mascara. Liquid eyeliner is a black line which won’t smudge/bleed if dry, but be careful and if you make a mistake wait until it is dry and wipe it off with a tissue. It is best for rimming the upper eyelid or defining the corners of the eye. Using it on the lower lid is not a good idea because it’s harder to apply, eyelashes get in the way and it gives an unnatural line. Kohl eyeliner can be used on the upper and lower eyelids, smudged and blended it gives a very black line, but don’t touch or cry because it will not stay put. Regular eyeliner gives a smudge line, goes on smoothly and you can’t make accidents with it, but the colour isn’t vivid, but you can use lighter shades such as slate for eyeshadows. If pale lipsticks aren’t available you can use white lipstick that most companies sell which can be melted with another colour and poured into a pot like an old eyeshadow or blush pot, but you’ll need a brush to apply it with. Pale cream foundation or concealer can be applied to the lips first to lighten up or tone down the lips.

How to apply 1960s style eye makeup

The mod look, as it was called, was comprised of thick eyelashes, eye liner, layered eye shadow, and a nude lip. This look is still seen and is still worn today in various ways on celebrities and the average woman.

Face:

This should be a natural look. Apply concealer on parts you want to cover up and, if you must, use sheer foundation all over your face, but apply sparingly. You can add blush, but it's not essential to this look. Make sure to use a pale color, such as baby pink or light peach.

Eyes:

Put a neutral color of eyeshadow on your eyelid. Then take a dark color, such as brown, black, or gray, and sweep it across the part of your eyelid where your eye meets the bone. Take a brown or black eyeliner; a pencil or liquid will do. Start either on the inner or outer corner of the eye. Create a thick line (but not too thick) and make the corners go slightly up and away from your eye. You can then attach false eyelashes or just apply a few coats of mascara thickly on the top and bottom lashes. If you want a simple look, then cut a third of the top fake lashes off and attach them to the outer corner. Remember to add mascara after you apply lashes.

Lips:

If your lips are very pink, then put some concealer over them to make them more pale. Then apply a pale pink, peach, or clear gloss. You can define your lips more if you wish by using a lip pencil. This can be white, flesh-colored, or the same color as your lip gloss.

1960- The Color Additive Amendment requires that colouring ingredients in cosmetics (as well as food and drugs) must be tested fro safety and approved by the FDA.
1962- Helena Rubinstein offers the first “Day of Beauty,” consisting of an exercise class, massage, lunch, facial, shampoo and hairstyling, manicure, pedicure, and makeup session—all for $35.
1963- Texan Mary Kay Ash spends her life’s savings to develop her skincare formula; six years and millions of dollars later, she rewards her top sales directors with pink Cadillacs.
first major cosmetics line designed especially for women of colour.
1965- The “pale look” is trendy—pale lips, no blush, bleached eyebrows, lots of dark eye shadow, mascara, and false eyelashes.
1965- Pablo– one of the first celebrity makeup artists –- introduces “fantasy” and “bizarre” eye looks incorporating jewels, flowers, and op art designs.
1966- London’s Mary Quant creates the mod look—lots of bold colours and geometric designs—in fashion and makeup.
1967- Estee Lauder launches Clinique, a company that downplays glamour and stresses “scientific” skincare. Salespeople wear lab coats, and products are packaged in antiseptic green.
1967- Supermodel Twiggy’s look is all the rage. She draws lashes around the eyes with a pencil and applies multiple layers of falsh lashes and mascara.
1968- African American model Naomi Sims appears on the cover of Life, and black models Bethann Hardison, Toukie Smith, Pat Cleveland, and Grace Jones hit the fashion runways in New York and Paris.
1969- Biba store opens in London, selling dramatic makeup in shades of purple, plum, and turquoise.

In 1961 girls blended shades of lipstick at home, but first blotted the lips with Max Factor Pancake makeup and white eyeshadow cream was one of the top sellers ( used for brightening eye sockets, but women later used it for highlighting or wrinkle-hiding). Eyes are the focus which were darkened using dark eyeshadow, liquid and kohl eyeliner, and mascara and were smudged on eyes in North America and Europe. The film Cleopatra with Elizabeth Taylor had very emphasised eyes and everyone learnt how to apply eyeliner and socket lines. Models Jean Shrimpton and Twiggy along with actress Julie Christie all had lined eye sockets that said Sixties Chick with chic. Young girls were frowned upon if they wore red lipstick so they used softened pink and peach colours which were acceptable to parents, but then became a trend. At the end of the decade it was the no makeup look. Lips became paler until girls could go no paler using white lipstick and would do no lighter. Cosmetics by Mary Quant brought out cosmetics that were great and affordable like the cheek contour shaders and highlighters. She encouraged users to use brushes to apply eyeliner and blusher to achieve a hollow cheek, wide eyed look like Twiggy. She made out leaflets with diagrams of the look. Her trademark is the Quant daisy logo. Psychedelics did the fantasy eye make-up with heavy white and black lines. The hipppy movements had natural wild looks and rejection of cosmetics. Face and body painting was also done. Veruschka, America’s top surrealist model got covered in flowers and Twiggy liked daisies.
If you want to use the look today you can use eyeshadows ranging from grey to black, eyeliner such as liquid, kohl and creamy pencil and mascara. Liquid eyeliner is a black line which won’t smudge/bleed if dry, but be careful and if you make a mistake wait until it is dry and wipe it off with a tissue. It is best for rimming the upper eyelid or defining the corners of the eye. Using it on the lower lid is not a good idea because it’s harder to apply, eyelashes get in the way and it gives an unnatural line. Kohl eyeliner can be used on the upper and lower eyelids, smudged and blended it gives a very black line, but don’t touch or cry because it will not stay put. Regular eyeliner gives a smudge line, goes on smoothly and you can’t make accidents with it, but the colour isn’t vivid, but you can use lighter shades such as slate for eyeshadows. If pale lipsticks aren’t available you can use white lipstick that most companies sell which can be melted with another colour and poured into a pot like an old eyeshadow or blush pot, but you’ll need a brush to apply it with. Pale cream foundation or concealer can be applied to the lips first to lighten up or tone down the lips.