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How to apologize for a racist comment

How to apologize for a racist comment

You might not know what a microaggression is, but you’ve probably heard at least one before. Chances are, you might have said or done one, too.

A 2019 survey by Glassdoor of 1,100 US employees found that 61% of US employees had witnessed or experienced workplace discrimination based on age, race, gender, or LGBTQ identity.

Microaggressions are unconscious expressions of racism, sexism, or other problematic beliefs. They come out in seemingly innocuous comments or actions by people who might be well-intentioned.

Think of asking a person of color where they’re really from, commenting on a Black colleague’s hair, or the “universal phenomenon” of men interrupting women.

Everyone holds unconscious beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, weight, religion, and many other characteristics. So while you might believe yourself to be totally rid of problematic opinions, there might come a time where you accidentally say a microaggression.

Here’s how to apologize for saying an offensive comment in the workplace.

Say sorry as soon as possible

As soon as you recognize that whatever came out of your mouth was problematic, apologize right away, said Joan Williams, University of California, Hastings College of the Law distinguished professor.

Williams advised saying the following: “Wow, I just heard what I said. I apologize.”

Don’t say “Sorry I offended you”

“I’m sorry that I offended you, but that wasn’t my intent.”

“Sorry, it was just a joke!”

Queens College associate professor David Rivera, a co-author of the book “Microaggression Theory: Influence and Implications”, told Business Insider that he hears too often of these sort of half-apologies.

Apologizing for offending someone is an attempt to validate your own comment by implying that the other person just reacted poorly, Rivera told Business Insider.

It’s also a way to brush off any allegations that you did something wrong.

Instead, recognize the implicit bias in your remark

“The apology should be earnest and include an awareness that you engaged in microaggressive behavior,” Rivera told Business Insider.

So, if you realize you made a blunder by complimenting a non-white coworker who was born in America on their English skills, you can try: “I’m sorry for what I just said. That was totally out of line, and based off the false impression that you were not born in America. My apologies again.”

Move on

There’s no need to continue to dwell on it right after you’ve said it, especially if it’s in front of other people, Williams said.

But you may want to follow up later with the person with an additional apology if it seems appropriate.

Keep educating yourself

Rivera said the best way to move on from saying a microaggression is to have “open communication about diversity and inclusion.”

That could involve setting up a diversity task force within your company, or keeping educated by reading one of dozens of books on anti-racism or diversity and inclusion.

How to apologize for a racist comment

Here’s how to apologize if you said something offensive at work.

  • What is a microaggression? It’s an unconscious expression of racism or sexism.
  • It’s important to know how to apologize if you’ve made a microaggressive comment in the workplace.
  • The most important thing to know when saying sorry: Apologize for your actions being offensive, not for the other person feeling offended.

You might not know what a microaggression is, but you’ve probably heard at least one before.

Microaggressions are unconscious expressions of racism or sexism. They come out in seemingly innocuous comments or actions by people who might be well-intentioned.

Think of asking a person of color where they’re really from, or the “universal phenomenon” of men interrupting women.

Everyone holds unconscious beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, weight, religion, and many other characteristics, according to the University of California, San Francisco. So while you might believe yourself to be totally rid of problematic opinions, there might come a time where you accidentally say a microaggression.

Here’s how to apologize for saying an offensive comment in the workplace.

Say sorry as soon as possible

How to apologize for a racist comment

As soon as you recognize that whatever came out of your mouth was problematic, apologize right away, said University of California, Hastings College of the Law distinguished professor Joan Williams.

Williams advised saying the following: “Wow, I just heard what I said. I apologize.”

Don’t say “Sorry I offended you”

How to apologize for a racist comment

“I’m sorry that I offended you, but that wasn’t my intent.”

“Sorry, it was just a joke!”

Queens College associate professor David Rivera, a co-author on an upcoming book called “Microaggression Theory: Influence and Implications”, told Business Insider that he hears too often of these sort of half-apologies.

Apologizing for offending someone is an attempt to validate your own comment by implying that the other person just reacted poorly, Rivera told Business Insider.

It’s also a way to brush off any allegations that you did something wrong.

Instead, recognize the implicit bias in your remark

How to apologize for a racist comment

“The apology should be earnest and include an awareness that you engaged in microaggressive behavior,” Rivera told Business Insider.

So, if you realize you made a blunder by complimenting a non-white coworker who was born in America on their English skills, you can try: “I’m sorry for what I just said. That was totally out of line, and based off the false impression that you were not born in America. My apologies again.”

Move on

How to apologize for a racist comment

There’s no need to continue to dwell on it right after you’ve said it, especially if it’s in front of other people, Williams said.

But you may want to follow up later with the person with an additional apology if it seems appropriate.

Keep educating yourself

How to apologize for a racist comment

Rivera said the best way to move on from saying a microaggression is to have “open communication about diversity and inclusion.”

That could involve setting up a diversity task force within your company, or keeping educated by reading publications, like Everyday Feminism or Mic, that focus on diverse perspectives and activism.

How to apologize for a racist comment

I feel the responsibility to repent and apologize for racism. Not everyone is a racist. Some who are accused of being a racist are not; some who deny it, are. Few people admit to being racist.

Regardless, there is a lot of racism on display in our world today. I have seldom been a victim but I have, without doubt, been a perpetrator. For those times, I am sincerely sorry. Due to insensitivity, a lack of exposure, and plain ignorance, it is easy to be unfair to others. Sometimes emotional pain, unforgiveness and bittnerness results in hatred for other people. My sincere desire is to treat everyone with respect and honor. When I fail in this area, I need God to help me.

But I am also sorry that some people openly practice racism with no sense of guilt. I am convinced that some of them don’t think their words and activities are racist. But they appear to take delight in hurting innocent people with their brazen prejudice. While they may never apologize to those they’ve hurt, perhaps it will help a victim if someone else does.

So, for those of you who have been called names, for those who have been treated unfairly because of your race, if you’ve ever been overlooked, ignored, ridiculed or marginalized because of the color of your skin, I am truly sorry. You are my family and friends. If you’ve been hurt, we’ve all been hurt. While you have taken the brunt of the pain and feel it more deeply than I, everyone is suffering the effects of racism. It’s terrible, and we should all be sorry that it happens. We should all repent and apologize for the sin of racism (unless we have never been guilty). And we should all work to try to end racism.

As a Christian who is expected to love everyone, I have a calling. As a leader who is responsible to influence others, I have a responsibility. As a white man, I have an opportunity. As a human being, I have an obligation. As a minister of the Gospel and a representative of God’s Kingdom on earth, I will give an account to Him.

Let’s end racism.

Perhaps this apology doesn’t help but it is worth a try. Someone must do something to try to bring healing to the races.

How to apologize for a racist comment

One day after his racist comments on social media were made public, Tom VanMeter sent the Thoroughbred Daily News a statement which he asked be published in the Tuesday night edition.

“Over the weekend, comments I made on a private page of a social media platform surfaced which have since come under scrutiny due to their racist nature. I will not attempt to deny that I wrote the comments, nor will I attempt to justify my actions. Certainly, I am frustrated with the current social situation in our country, however, what I wrote was unjustifiable. I was wrong and am disgusted by my actions. Contrary to what these comments might suggest, in no way do those responses represent my true feelings towards my friends and community members of color. Moving forward I am committed to listening and learning as to how I can be a better ally and advocate in my community and within the racing industry as to how we can better foster inclusivity for all. In the meantime, as a gesture of goodwill, I have made a donation to the NAACP in support of the important work this organization continues to do. I am hopeful all the industry stakeholders and the community at large can forgive me. I can and will do better.”

Monday, in response to a post asking people to retweet if they planned to boycott the NFL after they changed their policy to allow players to peacefully protest racial inequality in America during the national anthem by taking a knee, VanMeter referred to the National Football League, substituting an abbreviation of the “N-word,” a racist slur, for the word National. He also said of protestors, “Put em back in their cage. ”

VanMeter’s son, Griffin, made his own post on Facebook yesterday, which was critical of his father’s behavior.

Is there ever a case when a racist comment is warranted?

Records from the United States Bureau of Census have found that over 1,300 new families are formed every day. That data makes up about 16% of total families in the US operating in blended homes. However, statistics also show that 60%-70% of marriages that have kids from a former marriage will not succeed.

With that said, statistics from Pew Research found that 19% of new marriages are between couples from different ethnic or racial backgrounds, and thus any children they have would be biracial. However, while the US is meant to be a multicultural country, records show that cases of micro and macro aggressions against minorities are far too common to be ignored.

This case is highlighted in a recent online post in which a stepmother routinely makes racist comments to her stepdaughter, and inevitably gets called out.

Is there ever a case when a racist comment is warranted?

A Reddit post published on March 14th, reported on by Kate Fowler from Newsweek, has gone viral 14,200 upvotes and 1,500 comments.

The author begins her post by clarifying that she is 16-years-old, and she is also biracial. Her father is White while her mother is Chinese. However, her parents separated, and her father now has a new wife who is also White. The problem is, her new stepmother often makes derogatory comments about the author's race.

The teen states that she tried to like her father's new wife, but it became increasingly difficult the more the wife made racist comments towards her. An example the author uses is that at the wedding the stepmom excluded her from many pictures, and when the teen asked her about this the bride explained that she wanted a certain aesthetic in photos. The author took this as meaning that she wanted the aesthetic to be 'White people'.

Tensions were bubbling up over time, until they eventually erupted at a recent gathering. The stepmother is pregnant, and she had a baby shower a few weeks ago. At the party, the author heard the stepmother comment about how the teen didn't look much like her father, and that it will be nice for the dad to finally have a kid who resembles him. This was the final nail in the coffin for the author, and so she called her mother to pick her up.

The teen asked her father to intervene and have a conversation with the wife about her racist comments, otherwise she would no longer visit his home. The stepmother sent a text apologizing, but the teen didn't feel that this was good enough and simply doesn't want to talk to her stepmom anymore.

Racism is never appropriate.

Navigating a parent’s divorce can be a very difficult time for young people. The emotional toll can be psychologically harmful, in some cases with children blaming themselves for the separation, or wondering whether or not their parents could stop loving them. To recover from this sort of trauma takes patience to heal for all involved.

And with that, even further harm can be made due to experiences of racism. Instances of blatant racism are a common reality for Asian Americans. Research also shows that instances of racist harassment and aggressions are more often than not committed by White people.

The teen concludes her post by stating that while she loves her dad, she doesn't want to see his wife again and if that means cutting out her father because he won't stand up to her, that's his choice. Her mother and stepfather support her, but her dad is very upset and her grandparents on her father's side are also very mad at her.

What do you think? Is the teen justified in cutting out her stepmother from her life, considering she has routinely made racist comments and aggressions towards the author? Or is it cruel to cut her father out of her life as well, simply because he won't tell his wife to stop saying things that the author doesn't agree with?

I'm 21 now, and I said racist things towards my Black friends when I was around 15-18. I was born in a very red and predominantly white small town; I'm also Asian. My household would perpetuate racism to a point where I didn't question it and throughout my school years my schools would be predominantly white. It didn't help that I was also very impressionable and easily influenced. Nonetheless, I was a toxic person that spewed racist shit to people. One of those people being R (a friend that I met online). R did not like me for good reason when I first met her, but we got along overtime and now me, R, and S are best friends (5 years). I have matured overtime, educated myself, and started to make better decisions. I stand against racism in all forms now and I am still looking to educate myself further and looking to do what I can for other minority communities to the best of my abilities.

I have expressed my apologies for my racist actions to R in the past, but it was only until S asked me if I "really" apologized to R in a more formal/heart-to-heart way. It occurred to me that I have told her I was sorry on multiple occasions whenever they brought the conversation back up to point out my racist past, but never on a one-to-one way. Every time they bring up an old screenshot of me using a picture of the n-word (hard r) in an old meme, I instantly feel a twist in my guts and sick to my stomach. I understand that these are the consequences of my actions and I have to just live with it. I don't expect forgiveness, and I don't want the apology to be just me apologizing to feel better about myself. It's an apology for her, and how I perpetuated more racism than she already had to deal with as a black person. I feel shame, guilty, and disgust when I think back to those times and I wish I had someone to check me and put me in my place. But I made bad decisions and I want her to know that I am forever apologetic about my racist actions, and I am continuing on being better.

I tried looking online for similar experiences and found little, because unlike other stories, me and R are also best friends. We aren't strangers from another's past. She has acknowledged that I have made better decisions and learned from my past. I will also never not own up to my racist actions in the past, and I will admit to the harm that I have caused to the Black community, as well as my best of friends, R. I don't know why she stuck around me to be truly honest, but I am glad for it. I decided in this dilemma, that I would seek therapy on how to properly apologize and atone for my harmful, racist actions of my younger self. When seeking a new therapist, I figured it would be unwise to look for a White therapist to guide me on this; (Please tell me if what I am doing is also wrong) I want to know what I should do, so I sought out a Black therapist who mentioned that one of their strengths is "diversity issues." I can see the problem in me looking for a Black therapist to speak about my racist past towards my Black friend, but I also wanted the professional advice of a Black person on this issue.

In yet another episode of Accidentally Racist, Swiss blogger Cocomadkilla decided to get a leg-up in the competitive YouTube Beauty Blogger world by diving into K-Beauty, reviewing products by a brand called Glowrious. Well, she went there. I mean, not as there as that whole Mickey Rooney-portraying-an-Asian-person-in-Breakfast At Tiffany's thing, but. she went to the lobby of there.

Her original post is since deleted, but as it is 2017, screenshots live forever, and honestly there is little to misinterpret here.

Seriously, even if that post was filtered through a robot translator, the blatant puerile-levels of ignorant racism are fairly evident in that statement.

Look, I know that Asian beauty is so mysterious and exotic and special because people literally like to tell me that shit to my face as if I wasn't aware that I was Asian. But it is goddamn 2017 and y'all need to cut it out with this racist exoticism bullshit.

Anyway, folks are appropriately riled up about it. For a fairly not-that-well-known beauty blogger, it doesn't matter how many followers you don't have; being openly racist will definitely get eyes on your page — just not for the right reasons. But if you do happen to have a ton of followers (ahem Gigi Hadid) maybe don't mock Asian features?

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Good thing she has backup from her supportive BF!

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I can't speak to people with ignorant and racist tendencies, so it would be unfair for moi, a beauty editor of Asian descent, to even pretend I know what this blogger was thinking (but like, never pitch me, OK?). I can however do a quick house-keeping of how NOT to apologize after doing a totally gross racist thing.

OK, right there. All these racism apologies classically start with an "I never meant to. " like the garbage disaster that was that Fox News Man-On-The-Street segment in Chinatown that basically let professional fool Jesse Watters spew an impressive amount of racist Asian stereotypes for a five minute stretch. It's the "sorry if you were offended" and not the "sorry I did an offensive thing" framing that kills me every time. You never meant to offend anyone. Obviously, sure. That you're even writing this means that it was indeed the case. So skip the preamble and own up. You did a shit thing whether you knew you were doing a shit thing or not, so oops on you for not knowing better. Know better.

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Wow, what a completely irrelevant statement! Also, you have implicitly revealed your own ignorance surrounding racism, which no one is surprised at obviously, but this is a classic foot sandwich and you just took a big ol' chomp. As a reminder, racism — this type especially— relies on the systemic color-blind belief of "I don't see color" and all the social grudges of denying that race matters as a way to side-step having to recognize that race and racial appearance really do fucking matter. To say that you don't see color is to be complicit with a system that prefers to gloss over racial discrimination because it makes you uncomfortable to confront your own discriminations. Italians a.k.a. westerners a.k.a. white folk, essentially, are not a marginalized party in global terms and it's just bizarre to even imply that they are, especially in this context because. you make fun of white people too so that makes it OK to make fun of Asian people??

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Oh she did NOT go with the "I have non-white friends so I'm not racist" angle. She didn't. Please. This is embarrassing. Stop, please.

Goddamn, it's like. being unaware of your own racism because you ostensibly don't mind being around ethnic folk is such a social ill and completely misses the point. You can have non-white friends because you're well aware that humans are humans, and still think less of them based on their race, subconsciously or otherwise. Racism isn't all white hoods and pitchforks — the most problematic kind of racism is the kind that refuses to acknowledge itself out of cowardice and ignorance. You cannot solve a problem if you never analyze the problem.

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I hope we can move on. I hope. we can. move on. I hope.

That sign-off tho. I've never seen xoxo used to sinisterly in all my days. She may as well have said "I'm just SO embarrassed that people got a wee bit uncomfortable about my dehumanizing and denigrating Asian peoples as the unintelligible silly sounds their wackadoo language sounds like, but gosh, they're totally cool in my book, so whaddaya say — forgivsies?"

How to apologize for a racist comment

Thanks for stopping by the petition. I know the notice of a petition is probably a shocker for those of you who know me. Since my catch phases are ‘dude, I just work here’ and ‘all about getting PAID!’

What’s this about? Shaq O’Neil taunted Houston Rocket Yao Ming by speaking ‘fake Chinese’. You know what I’m talking about: the ‘Ching-chong-yang-wah-ah-soh’ chant. See the article from Asian Week (http://www.asianweek.com/2003_01_03/sports_yaoming.html). Is he a racist? That’s his business. Should we tolerate this type of behavior? Absolutely not.

Shaq has reportedly offered the following apology on Friday 1/10: ‘I mean, if I was the first one to do it, and the only one to do it, I could see what they’re talking about. But if I offended anybody, I apologize.’ (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20030111/ap_on_sp_ba_ne/bkn_shaq_yao_1) Actually, that didn’t sound like an apology. Maybe the Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak can do better: ‘Knowing Shaquille, I am certain that this was nothing more than a misguided attempt at humor’ (http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/sports/4926546.htm)
Sadly that doesn’t sound like an apology either.

What’s the big deal? Whether the Shaq comments were funny or not, it is a race-based derogatory comment. This is not just an insult to Yao Ming, but also an affront to all Americans want to ‘live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.’ The sad part is, Shaq was defending himself, instead of giving a real apology!! Now that’s no joke.

What should we do about it? Speak up!! Let the media outlets, the NBA, the Lakers, and influential civil rights leaders know that we are not down with this non-apology. Hey, we are people, not rugs. About time people stop stepping on us.

We the undersigned petition that Shaquille O’Neal apologizes for his racial slurs directed to Yao Ming. The apology should acknowledges that race-based derogatory comments, no matter the intent, is wrong.

Sabrina Claudio may get disowned by the Black community for a very long time.

Visit streaming.thesource.com for more information

The 21-year-old singer songwriter admitted to creating a Twitter account, to degrade, downplay and troll Black women. Before Claudio’s career got started, it may have suffered a huge blow. In an era where women empowerment is at its all-time high and will continue to grow, the “Unravel Me” singer fails to live by that motto.

Using her fake twitter handle, she made distasteful comments about Black women. “It must suck to be a Black girl with no booty,” said Claudio. Actress, Amanda Seales, took to Twitter to denounce Claudio and her racist remarks about our Black Queens.

How to apologize for a racist comment–> –> Advertisement

But how u (Sabrina Claudio) make a whole twitter account just to shit on black women while you simultaneously make music that emulates black women. Lol these chicks is wild out here, man.

— Amanda Seales ?? (@amandaseales) April 11, 2018

Claudio rose to fame over the past year after her singles, “Unravel Me” and “Belong to You” peaked at No. 22 and No. 2 respectively on the Billboard Twitter Emerging Artists chart. Claudio has yet to work with any Black women, and now has burned the bridge to even do so. She may be able to recover from this, but it is highly doubtful. She has songs with Black male artists, such as 6black and most recently, Khalid.

Claudio released a statement of apology after her past was exposed. The tweet below is an accurate depiction of her apology.

A visual representation of this tweet. You’re only sorry you got caught. pic.twitter.com/xpTFYHTFDq

— B a b y g i r l (@Bullshiggity) April 10, 2018

View Claudio’s apology below.

Sabrina Claudio is Claudio is an R&B singer. R&B has always been and will always be dominated by African American artists. A number of Black female artist have paved the way for Claudio to be able to have such a platform to display her talent. It is disappointing to see a woman, with such a lack for awareness. Maybe Claudio can bounce back from this, but it will take a long time to receive support from Black women in the industry as well as fans and supporters. Until then, Claudio music is be turned away from the turntables of many DJs around the country.

Trump supporters say they’re “tired of being called racists.” At a recent rally in Cincinnati, the Atlantic reported, white attendees defended themselves against the charge by citing the “evidence”: They had donated money to help black foster children; they deeply loved their black and mixed-race grandchildren.

Shortly after rejecting the “racist” label, however, these same rallygoers made racist remarks to the journalist who interviewed them. Regarding Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), who came to the United States as a Somali refugee, one woman offered: “I don’t want her stinkin’ Muslim crap in my country.”

Making racist remarks while claiming not to be racist seems paradoxical. President Trump himself is a case in point. “I am the least racist person there is anywhere in the world,” he told reporters last month, and he often name-checks black celebrity friends to support his contention. At the same time, he continues to take racist jabs at individuals and groups.

Even white people who consider themselves good allies of people of color can be unaware of their racial biases. From public figures to pundits to public intellectuals to politicians, it’s a pervasive, bipartisan, international problem. The white Democratic governor of Virginia, Ralph Northam, for example, distanced himself from a photo of a person in blackface on his 1984 medical school yearbook page by talking about how he practiced medicine. “I can tell you I treat everyone the same way,” he said. “Nobody has ever thought or accused me of being racist, and if and when I practice again, I will continue that same direction.” White actor Liam Neeson confessed that decades ago, after a friend reported that she had been raped by a black man, he felt a “primal urge” to retaliate by harming black men in general. Responding to the backlash, he said: “I’m not racist. . . . If she had said an Irish or a Scot or a Brit or a Lithuanian, I know I would have had the same effect.”

So, if you are a white person and someone calls you racist, and the charge perplexes you, what should you do? As a white college professor who teaches courses on media and race at a diverse public university, here’s my advice.

Step 1: Recognize that what matters most is what happened just now.

Instagram star Girl With No Job posts a tearful apology for uncovered RACIST tweets, as her online talk show is canceled by producers – after her mom was exposed as Alt-right Islamaphobe

  • Claudia Oshry Soffer runs the popular Instagram meme account Girl With No Job
  • Two of her sisters Jackie and Margo, also run extremely popular Instagram accounts, while a fourth sister Olivia acts as manager for all three
  • Claudia has taken to Instagram to apologize to her 2.8 million followers for a series of racist tweets she posted in 2012 and 2015
  • After the story broke, Oshry Soffer’s YouYube show The Morning Breath, hosted with sister Jackie O, was canceled by Oath
  • Her mother Pamela Geller hosted a ‘Draw the Prophet Muhammad’ contest in Texas and was denied entry to the UK in 2013
  • Oshry Soffer and her sisters are frequently with Geller, but do not show her or specifically reference her in photo shoots and on their social media
  • However, they do appear to share at least some of her political views, as they have been vocal in their support of Trump and disdain for Obama

Published: 19:08 BST, 1 March 2018 | Updated: 20:19 BST, 1 March 2018

An Instagram star has been forced to apologize for a series of racists Tweets she posted in 2012 and 2015.

Claudia Oshry Soffer, from New York City took to Instagram after The Daily Beast exposed her mother is an Alt-right Islamophobe who was banned from Entering England in 2013 for hate speech, and revealed that Oshry Soffer had publicly expressed similar views.

The tweets relate to former US president Barack Obama and Muslims.

How to apologize for a racist comment

How to apologize for a racist comment

Instagram start Claudia Oshry Soffer who runs the account Girl With No Job has been forced to apologize for a series of racist tweets posted in 2012 and 2015

How to apologize for a racist comment

Past: The tweets were exposed after it was uncovered that her mother is an Alt-right Islamophobe who was banned from Entering England in 2013 for hate speech

How to apologize for a racist comment

Consequences: Although Oshry Soffer has offered her youth as a defense for her actions, some of the tweets were sent two years ago

How to apologize for a racist comment

Second chance: In the video posted to her page, Oshry Soffer tearfully told fans she’s not racist and asked for another chance to redeem herself

Teary eyed, Oshry Soffer began the video by sharing that she needed to address what had happened.

‘First and foremost I need to apologize. Some news was broke this morning about who my mom is and then some really disgusting vile, stupid tweets of mine resurfaced, she began.

‘I need to just come right out and say how sorry I am. It’s not cool, it’s not funny. I was a dumb kid, I was 16, I thought I was being funny and cool on Twitter and it’s not, I’m not racist.

‘I can’t believe I even have to say that. I’m so sorry to anyone who read those tweets and had a reaction, was upset because you’re totally entitled to that reaction.’

She then added that it’s ‘important’ for her fans to know who she really is and asked for a second chance so she could show them who she is and what she stands for.

‘I understand that these things take time and what I did was not okay and I’m so sorry,’ she added.

However it seems some former fans aren’t buying her apology, taking to the comments section in their droves to air their disgust and disbelief.

Instagram user @rayakssm wrote: ‘Seeing these tweets shows that you clearly share many of the views that your mother does. Many of us have said dumb things when we were younger but not about people’s religion and ethnicity.

‘I feel badly for you especially because you did seem like an awesome person but I am ultimately glad that people were able to make the connection to your family and your VIEWS and be able to make an INFORMED choice when watching your show.’

While @thatgirlshazy typed: ‘Your mother literally runs a hate group which you and your whole family have profited from for years. How have you shown us that you don’t support your mother’s Islamophobic views? How rich it is of a bunch of people who have never been impacted by your family’s bigotry to give you a pass.

‘All because they enjoy your unoriginal, curated memes. Until you denounce Pamela Gellar’s disgusting vitriol and apologize to the Muslim community, you and your crocodile tears are cancelled.’

John Boyd Jr., the president of the National Black Farmers Association, called on Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) to apologize for comments he made recently taking aim at a provision in the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill that seeks to help socially disadvantaged Black farmers and farmers of color.

During an appearance on MSNBC’s “PoliticsNation with Al Sharpton” on Sunday, Boyd, who has long been an advocate in Washington for Black farmers, criticized Graham for comments balking at the provision’s inclusion in the coronavirus relief bill despite, in Boyd’s words, having “never once used his megaphone to speak out against the discrimination” Black farmers have long faced.

“I lobbied Sen. Lindsey Graham as a congressman. I lobbied him as a senator. I’ve been by his office and asked him to help me fix the problems at the United States Department of Agriculture that caused Black farmers to lose millions of acres of land and address the lack of loans and subsidies, and he’s never once used his megaphone to speak out against the discrimination,” he said.

“But as soon as we get justice here, some 30 years later, his very first words — he said he found it troubling, and in his last part of his statement, he said that we need to check them,” he said.

The Hill has reached out to Graham’s office for comment.

Boyd was referring to comments Graham made in an appearance on Fox News last week about the provision, which seeks to establish a $5 billion fund for debt repayment aimed at helping disadvantaged farmers.

Graham said during the appearance that he was “really” bothered by the provision’s inclusion in the coronavirus bill, blasting it as part of a Democratic “wish list.”

“Let me give you an example of something that really bothers me. In this bill, if you’re a farmer, your loan will be forgiven up to 120 percent of your loan . if you’re socially disadvantaged, if you’re African American, some other minority. But if you’re [a] white person, if you’re a white woman, no forgiveness. That’s reparations. What does that have to do with COVID?” he said.

Due to years of racial discrimination, Black farmers are more likely to have more debt, less land and less access to credit. According to estimates from the Farm Bureau, Black farmers account for roughly a fourth disadvantaged farms that would be eligible for loan relief under the fund program.

However, the provision does not include language that bars white farmers from applying for the benefits.

In his appearance on MSNBC on Sunday, Boyd said the measure “rectifies a wrong for Black and other farmers of color” who have been “shut out of the U.S. farm subsidy program, U.S. farm lending at the United States Department of Agriculture,” among other programs.

He went on to label Graham’s comments as “racist” and said his organization is calling for the senator to issue an apology.

“The National Black Farmers Association is calling for him to apologize. . He needs to apologize not only to our Black farmers but to Black people in this country who struggled for so very, very long, and now we get a chance for a little bit of justice, and he uses his megaphone to play this race type thing when he knows that firsthand that Black farmers have suffered,” he said.

“He has 6,000 Black farmers in his state, and he won’t help us, but he uses his megaphone to try to deny payments from Black farmers,” he added.

During the interview, Boyd also put pressure on Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to “immediately” get debt relief out to “the thousands of Black farmers that desperately need it right now.”

“I spoke to Secretary Vilsack yesterday and urged him to hurry up and put in place the commission and to get the debt relief to not just Black farmers but farmers of color, Native American farmers, Hispanic farmers and other socially disadvantaged farmers. He can’t be the same Secretary Vilsack he was under the Obama years. He’s going to have to take a more aggressive approach to help fix the discriminating culture,” he added.

How to apologize for a racist comment

A Latino-focused media watchdog is calling on KTLA to force its morning show anchor to apologize on air for a seemingly racist comment made last week about Latinos.

Last Monday, KTLA 5 Morning News co-anchor Chris Schauble insinuated that bond hearings are as common to Latinos as baptisms and graduations, the National Hispanic Media Coalition said Monday.

While airing a segment in which reporter Allie Mac Kay interviewed the manager and employees of El Coyote Mexican Restaurant, Schauble appeared to jokingly add “bond hearings” to a list of common life events the mostly Latino employees attend together.

Mac Kay: “These employees here at the lovely El Coyote, some of them have been here, quite frankly, longer than some of you at the desk have been alive. This man Billy, he has been here for over 30 years, you are the manager here, what is it like? It’s a total family atmosphere right?”

Restaurant Manager: Right. that’s what keeps us all together, because it’s such a family, we know each other. We know their songs, their daughters, their parents, we go to their weddings, their baptismals, we share all our good times together . “

Schauble: “. bond hearings.”

Alex Nogales, the president and CEO of the nonprofit watchdog group, said the top brass at KTLA had reprimanded Schauble and compelled the anchor to apologize to the employees at El Coyote and take a sensitivity training course.

But for Nogales, this is not enough.

“The guy said it on the air, he should apologize on the air,” Nogales told TheWrap. “He said something stupid, he doesn’t have to describe it as a stupid, but he has to go on the air and apologize for the inappropriate comment.”

A spokesperson for KTLA did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

But soon after offended viewers began calling the station, Mac Kay repudiated the comment in a Facebook post.

“I didn’t hear it, but just talked to him,” she wrote. “The anchors’ mics are on the whole segment, he knew it was — he was just being irreverent and is BEYOND mortified that people were offended.”

KTLA pulled the clip of the segment from its website, but you can watch it here.

How to apologize for a racist comment

A former B.C. minor league hockey broadcaster is apologizing for a racist comment he made about a player during Friday night’s BC Hockey League playoff game between the Alberni Valley Bulldogs and the Langley Rivermen.

Bruce MacDonald was providing colour commentary for the Bulldogs’ broadcast. During the second period, after a dust-up involving Rivermen forward Owen Kim, MacDonald wondered aloud whether Kim speaks English.

"Come on, Kim," MacDonald can be heard saying in a video of the incident posted on Twitter by the Langley Rivermen’s communications and digital media co-ordinator.

"Does he speak English? You know, maybe that’s the problem."

Play-by-play broadcaster Evan Hammond immediately said MacDonald had gone too far, and the colour commentator was taken off the air.

MacDonald’s comments drew condemnation on social media. Users also praised Hammond and the league for their quick responses to the incident.

In a statement posted on Twitter Saturday, MacDonald said he had emailed an apology to the Rivermen organization Friday night.

"It was important to me to try and reach out to Owen Kim first privately," MacDonald’s statement reads.

"As I said in that letter (to the Rivermen), no one should be made to feel that way and I take full responsibility for my racist words. I am deeply sorry for the hurt I have caused Owen Kim, his family and anyone else who was affected by what I said."

The league issued a statement late on Friday apologizing to Kim, his family and anyone else who had heard the broadcast, and saying the BCHL has “zero tolerance for this type of behaviour.”

The statement says MacDonald has been banned from any future BCHL broadcasts.

In his statement, MacDonald also apologized to Alberni Valley Bulldogs fans and the broader community.

"I am heartbroken that I caused it to end this way," the statement reads. "I will do whatever I can and is asked of me to make this right."

Radio station 93.3 The Peak, which broadcasts Bulldogs games, also issued a statement apologizing to Kim and condemning the comments, calling them "extremely offensive" and "inappropriate."

"Racism has no place in hockey," reads the statement from Rob Bye, Vancouver Island general manager for Pattison Media Ltd.

"Racism has no place on our radio stations nor in our company."

just because someone is being a dickhead doesn’t make it okay to hate everyone who looks like them. I see racist garbage all the time on reddit and it doesn’t change the way i feel about anyone else, as is the case with most people. if someone is turned into a racist because of tweets like that then they were likely already headed in a radical direction anyway, the blame is on them

And when it happens they will say they were right all along.

I dont get how people can be such hypocrites? Anyone can be racist. If you start going on about how white people are evil your going to create a bunch of white supremacists who grow up thinking all black people hate them so they'll hate them back. Why cant we see pass the steeyotypes and see only a smaller percentage of every race is actually racist

Great, let's self segregate even more! I do not apologize for merely existing. You should not either. I'm sorry life possibly dealt your shitty hand. I wasn't dealt the best hand myself but I would never ever ask someone to apologize to me because of a skin color.

For anyone wondering what “ratiod” means, it’s when you get more comments than likes/retweets.

No problem. I'll just start telling them that I identify as whatever minority group the media likes that day.

Racism is less about individual comments (distraction) and more about institutional and systemic racism embedded into the foundations of society. If I say I hate whitey all day it won't enact policies for the next few hundred years which disproportionally effect white people.

So while any individual of any 'race' can express racist opinions the consequences differ. For example power in relationships is important, if a child hits a man and a man hits a child, both are guilty of perpetrating violence yet the effects vary depending on the power balance within the relationship.

The more powerful actor bares greater responsibility (the law reflects this) until all things are equal. Simple stuff I would think.

An average white individual has no greater power than a black one. I would argue power is determined by money not race.

As people we dont think as a hive mind we think as individuals with our own selfish wants and needs and plenty of white people doing it really really tough wpuld have a hard time believing they possess any form of power or privilege.

Conversely plenty of balck people are doing really well.

When the battlers are told they are privledged or must accept anti white slander because they apparently have more power I can see how this breeds resentment.

True equality is the only way forward. Any form of hate is detrimental to both parties in the long run.

You’re complicating this when it’s not needed. This argument comes off as more of an excuse than anything that means other races cant be racist. Racism by definition is when you think a person is worse or bellow you because of their skin colour. This person is racist , I guess I understand your point but calling somebody prejudiced makes them sound annoying and almost downplays it. Also your saying insults don’t change anything you act as if because white people used to have slaves we can’t have a black president. Insults like that change public perception it becomes more socially acceptable to be racist than it already is. We could elect racist public officials. When people jump to the defense of racists saying it’s institutionalized and not their fault it shows that it’s ok. Also I’m curious what disadvantages do white people have honestly in day to day life if a black person calls you racist it could ruin your social life or even get you fired. I live in a rural area but you would get torn to shreds for being racist.

How to apologize for a racist comment

2:22 No apology from Doug Ford on controversial immigration comments

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TORONTO — Ontario Premier Doug Ford would not apologize Tuesday for comments about immigrants that some called “callous” and “xenophobic,” raising concerns that he was feeding negative stereotypes about newcomers.

While talking about a shortage of workers in the province a day earlier, Ford said people who want to come and work their “tail off” like every other new Canadian has done should come to Ontario, but those who want to “collect the dole and sit around” should go elsewhere.

New Democrat Doly Begum said at the legislature Tuesday that the comments were callous and offensive to families like hers, who came to Ontario for a better future, and called for an apology.

Ford said he is pro-immigration, but he did not apologize.

“All you have to do is come to a Ford fest,” he said, referencing an annual Ford family party for supporters, particularly popular when his late brother Rob Ford was the Toronto mayor.

“You’ll see the support from people around the world that come there … I’ll tell you how Ford Nation was created. They came to this country, they couldn’t get ahold of any NDP (or) Liberal leaders, but they got ahold of the mayor of Toronto, they got a hold of the premier. We show up to their door. We return their calls.”

The Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants condemned Doug Ford’s initial comments.

“Words matter. (Premier Ford) should NOT be promoting xenophobic tropes about Im/migrants,” the group wrote in a tweet.

Nawaz Tahir had also noticed the comments. He acted as a spokesman for a London, Ont., mosque where a memorial service was held for four members of a Muslim family who were killed when a pickup truck hit them in what police allege was an intentional act.

How to apologize for a racist comment

How to apologize for a racist comment

Tahir met Ford that night and said he saw the empathy the premier showed to the Afzaal family. He said he hopes that same empathy leads Ford to apologize for his comments.

How to apologize for a racist comment

3:18 Ford talks Ontario worker shortage, says only ‘hard-working’ new Canadians welcome

“It’s important to understand why it’s offensive and to come out and say, you know, ‘It was wrong of me to say this’ and show an understanding of why it’s wrong,” Tahir said.

“If you do that as the premier of Ontario, you help combat the stereotype that the original comments fed into.”

Tahir said he has heard from community members who are offended by the comments. Tahir, who was born in London, said he has also been on the receiving end of strangers yelling at him to go back to his country.

“It’s this kind of narrative that feeds into that stereotype, that anger, that immigrants are coming here and doing something negative or negatively impacting the economy,” he said.

Deputy Premier Christine Elliott defended Ford earlier in the day, saying an apology wasn’t necessary.

“What the premier was actually saying is that we need more immigration in Ontario,” she said. “We have lots of work. We know that when people come here they do work hard.”

Ontario Liberal Leader Steven Del Duca urged Ford to apologize.

“It doesn’t show weakness to apologize when you make a mistake,” he said. “I think it actually shows strength.”

Even the language Ford used shows an “outdated notion of the value of immigration,” Del Duca said.

“I’d encourage Doug, get out of the bubble. Get out of the 1950s, take a look at modern Ontario, be comfortable with it, support it, and let’s move forward,” he said.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath said Ford should show leadership and say he is sorry.

“They deserved an apology and instead they got an invitation to Ford Fest and that’s just not acceptable,” she said.

Montreal’s Chinese community is angry that Québec solidaire has refused to apologize for what they consider racist comments by a QS MNA.

How to apologize for a racist comment

Quebec solidaire MNA Émilise Lessard-Therrien (Rouyn-Noranda-Témiscamingue). Photo by Peter McCabe / MONTREAL GAZETTE

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About 150 members of Montreal’s Chinese community and allies marched through the streets of downtown Montreal Sunday demanding an official apology from the leadership of Québec solidaire for what they consider racist comments by one of the party’s elected members of National Assembly.

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On Feb. 13, Émilise Lessard-Therrien, QS’s agricultural critic and elected MNA for Rouyn-Noranda–Témiscamingue, gave an interview with an online agricultural newspaper la vie Agricole. Near the end of that interview, Lessard-Therrien, used the word “predatory” to describe investors from China who she said have been spotted scoping out agricultural lands in her riding and lobbying for changes to laws that currently limit acquisition of agricultural land by non-residents.

Marchers demand Québec solidaire apologize for MNA’s “racist” comments Back to video

“In a few years, where in the world will there be land in relatively good shape and fresh water in big quantities? In Quebec and particularly in Témiscamingue where we have a lot of undeveloped land,” she said, after explaining that climate change will render agriculture difficult in some countries.

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“The Chinese are coming and they have big projects and they are putting a lot of pressure,” Lessard-Therrien said. “They haven’t purchased (land) yet because there are federal mechanisms that stop them, but they are touring the country roads, they are preparing the land in order to come eventually. … Among ourselves, we call them predators, they are predators of agricultural lands. We see them, we sense them. I am saying that undeveloped land can always be cultivated, but land that belongs to China can never nourish Quebecers.”

At a rally near QS’s Montreal office on Ontario St. E., members of various anti-racism groups accused Lessard-Therrien of fanning the flames of anti-Chinese sentiment and stoking fear against those from other non-majority ethnic communities. They also called out QS leadership for refusing to denounce her words.

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“A party that professes to be a progressive party is spreading lies and they refuse to take those lies back. We expect racism from the alt-right, from La Meute and the CAQ,” Dolores Chew, of the South Asian Women’s Community Centre, told the gathering.

Patricia Alexander, who identified herself as a member of Québec solidaire, took to the megaphone to tell those gathered that she is angry that the party leadership has not taken a clear position against the MNA’s statements.

“I don’t represent Québec solidaire, but I am a member. I’ve had a lump in my throat for weeks now. When we make a mistake, even when it was unintended, we have to apologize. We have to recognize that we understand what the error was and we have to commit to doing better,” Alexander said.

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How to apologize for a racist comment

Anti-racism activist Safa Chebbi. Photo by Pierre Obendrauf / Montreal Gazette files

“Contemporary racism, in Quebec as elsewhere, remains such a diffuse, sly and shameful phenomenon that even our natural allies still refuse to see it and to question themselves,” said Safa Chebbi, vice-president of Alternatives, a human rights and environmental organization.

In a statement posted on Facebook on Feb. 28, Lessard-Therrien said her words have been distorted in some reports, but also admitted that some of her statements were “clumsily worded.”

She said she would be happy to speak to the organizers of Sunday’s rally. “If I was in Montreal, I would go to meet with the organizers of the event to talk about both land grabbing and the fight against racism. Moreover, I am quite open to discussing these issues with them. It would be an interesting exchange and I’m sure we would get along. I do not wish to offend anyone with my words. One thing is certain, I will continue to fight to defend a plural and diversified model of agriculture to strive for food sovereignty in Quebec. And I will try to do it as skilfully as possible.”

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May Chiu, spokesperson for the Progressive Chinese of Québec and one of the organizers of the march, said Lessard-Therrien’s explanation is not adequate.

“She said she was misinterpreted and she offered to speak to me personally,” Chiu said. “I wrote back to her and said anytime you want a conversation that’s fine with me but this is not an issue just between two women. The community is larger than just me. And also what is the position of the party in all of this? Are they just throwing you under the bus to deal with this fallout? There has to be some institutional responsibility.”

Chiu said not only should the party leadership apologize, they should explain what they will do to counter racism in Quebec. A good start, she said, would be to give new MNAs sensitivity training about issues like racism before they speak publicly.

The Gazette requested a comment from the leadership of Québec solidaire. In an e-mailed response Sunday afternoon, the party’s communications coordinator Elise Tanguay wrote: “We consider that we have already responded to the concerns of activists and organizations through the statement of Émilise Lessard-Therrien, who invited them to a meeting to discuss it. Québec solidaire fully supports Ms. Lessard-Therrien’s approach. We will not comment further.”

A former B.C. minor league hockey broadcaster is apologizing for a racist comment he made about a player during Friday night’s BC Hockey League playoff game between the Alberni Valley Bulldogs and the Langley Rivermen.

Bruce MacDonald was providing colour commentary for the Bulldogs’ broadcast. During the second period, after a dust-up involving Rivermen forward Owen Kim, MacDonald wondered aloud whether Kim speaks English.

"Come on, Kim," MacDonald can be heard saying in a video of the incident posted on Twitter by the Langley Rivermen’s communications and digital media co-ordinator.

"Does he speak English? You know, maybe that’s the problem."

Play-by-play broadcaster Evan Hammond immediately said MacDonald had gone too far, and the colour commentator was taken off the air.

MacDonald’s comments drew condemnation on social media. Users also praised Hammond and the league for their quick responses to the incident.

In a statement posted on Twitter Saturday, MacDonald said he had emailed an apology to the Rivermen organization Friday night.

"It was important to me to try and reach out to Owen Kim first privately," MacDonald’s statement reads.

"As I said in that letter (to the Rivermen), no one should be made to feel that way and I take full responsibility for my racist words. I am deeply sorry for the hurt I have caused Owen Kim, his family and anyone else who was affected by what I said."

The league issued a statement late on Friday apologizing to Kim, his family and anyone else who had heard the broadcast, and saying the BCHL has “zero tolerance for this type of behaviour.”

The statement says MacDonald has been banned from any future BCHL broadcasts.

In his statement, MacDonald also apologized to Alberni Valley Bulldogs fans and the broader community.

"I am heartbroken that I caused it to end this way," the statement reads. "I will do whatever I can and is asked of me to make this right."

Radio station 93.3 The Peak, which broadcasts Bulldogs games, also issued a statement apologizing to Kim and condemning the comments, calling them "extremely offensive" and "inappropriate."

"Racism has no place in hockey," reads the statement from Rob Bye, Vancouver Island general manager for Pattison Media Ltd.

"Racism has no place on our radio stations nor in our company."

A Latino-focused media watchdog is calling on KTLA to force its morning show anchor to apologize on air for a seemingly racist comment made last week about Latinos.

How to apologize for a racist comment

Last Monday, KTLA 5 Morning News co-anchor Chris Schauble insinuated that bond hearings are as common to Latinos as baptisms and graduations, the National Hispanic Media Coalition said Monday.

While airing a segment in which reporter Allie Mac Kay interviewed the manager and employees of El Coyote Mexican Restaurant, Schauble appeared to jokingly add "bond hearings" to a list of common life events the mostly Latino employees attend together.

Mac Kay: "These employees here at the lovely El Coyote, some of them have been here, quite frankly, longer than some of you at the desk have been alive. This man Billy, he has been here for over 30 years, you are the manager here, what is it like? It's a total family atmosphere right?"

Restaurant Manager: Right. that's what keeps us all together, because it's such a family, we know each other. We know their songs, their daughters, their parents, we go to their weddings, their baptismals, we share all our good times together …"

Schauble: "… bond hearings."

Alex Nogales, the president and CEO of the nonprofit watchdog group, said the top brass at KTLA had reprimanded Schauble and compelled the anchor to apologize to the employees at El Coyote and take a sensitivity training course.

But for Nogales, this is not enough.

"The guy said it on the air, he should apologize on the air," Nogales told TheWrap. "He said something stupid, he doesn't have to describe it as a stupid, but he has to go on the air and apologize for the inappropriate comment."

A spokesperson for KTLA did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

But soon after offended viewers began calling the station, Mac Kay repudiated the comment in a Facebook post.

"I didn't hear it, but just talked to him," she wrote. "The anchors' mics are on the whole segment, he knew it was — he was just being irreverent and is BEYOND mortified that people were offended."

KTLA pulled the clip of the segment from its website, but you can watch it here.

How to apologize for a racist comment

Weeks after generating controversy for discussing a past event in which he wanted to bait a black man into fighting him to avenge a recently raped friend, Liam Neeson has released an apology for the remarks.

“Over the last several weeks, I have reflected on and spoken to a variety of people who were hurt by my impulsive recounting of a brutal rape of a dear female friend nearly 40 years ago and my unacceptable thoughts and actions at that time in response to this crime,” he said in a statement. “The horror of what happened to my friend ignited irrational thoughts that do not represent the person I am. In trying to explain those feelings today, I missed the point and hurt many people at a time when language is so often weaponized and an entire community of innocent people are targeted in acts of rage. What I failed to realize is that this is not about justifying my anger all those years ago, it is also about the impact my words have today. I was wrong to do what I did. I recognize that, although the comments I made do not reflect, in any way, my true feelings nor me, they were hurtful and divisive. I profoundly apologize.”

The initial remarks came when he was asked a question about tapping into a revenge mentality while he was promoting his most recent thriller, “Cold Pursuit.”

In an article published in Britain’s Independent newspaper in early February, Neeson recalled an incident in which he wanted to kill “some black bastard” upon learning that his close friend was brutally raped over 40 years ago.

“I went up and down areas with a cosh (a club), hoping I’d be approached by somebody — I’m ashamed to say that — and I did it for maybe a week, hoping some ‘black bastard’ would come out of a pub and have a go at me about something, you know? So that I could kill him,” he said at the time.

He would go on to address the controversy on “Good Morning America,” where he told Robin Roberts, “I’m not a racist.”

“I never felt this before, which was a primal urge to lash out,” he explained to Roberts. “I asked her, ‘Did you know the person? It was a man? His race?’ She said he was a black man. I thought, ‘Ok.’ After that, there were some nights I went out deliberately into black areas in this city, looking to be set upon so that I could unleash physical violence. I did it for maybe four or five times. It really shocked me, this primal urge I had. It shocked me and it hurt me. I did seek help. I went to a priest. I had two very good friends I talked to, and believe it or not — power walking — to get rid of this.”

How to apologize for a racist comment

In a series of Twitter posts late Tuesday evening and early Wednesday, Roseanne Barr apologized for a racist tweet that led to the cancellation of her hit television show.

In a statement Barr acknowledged as her own, she said: "I deeply regret my comments from late last night on Twitter. Above all, I want to apologize to Valerie Jarrett, as well as to ABC and the cast and crew of the Roseanne show. I am sorry for making a thoughtless joke that does not reflect my values – I love all people and am very sorry. Today my words caused hundreds of hardworking people to lose their jobs. I also sincerely apologize to the audience that has embraced my work for decades. I apologize from the bottom of my heart and hope you can find it in your hearts to forgive me."

The comedian then retweeted messages from supporters who defend the tweet that got her show canceled.

Barr tweeted: "hey guys, don't defend me, it's sweet of you 2 try, but. losing my show is 0 compared 2 being labelled a racist over one tweet-that I regret even more."

But that sentiment contrasted with many retweets from the comedian. Her Twitter timeline shows that, before and after asking fans not to defend her, she retweeted messages suggesting Barr's critics are hypocritical or otherwise defending her original, racist remarks.

Barr also retweeted a post from a user who said her "apology is not sincere."

ABC scraps a hit show

ABC on Tuesday announced the cancellation of the hit sitcom "Roseanne" following "abhorrent" comments from the show's star. Just an hour later, Barr's talent agency ICM Partners dropped her as a client, the firm confirmed to CNBC.

Barr's abrupt downfall comes after a year of successes, including record ratings for her show's debut and a congratulatory call from the president. Throughout, however, Barr has attracted criticism for her use of social media to provoke, attack, and spread conspiracy theories.

According to consulting firm Kantar Media, "Roseanne" generated revenue of $45 million between March and May of this year.

"Roseanne's Twitter statement is abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values, and we have decided to cancel her show," Channing Dungey, president of ABC Entertainment, said in a statement Tuesday.

After controversy erupted about her tweet, Barr posted this message: "I apologize to Valerie Jarrett and to all Americans. I am truly sorry for making a bad joke about her politics and her looks. I should have known better. Forgive me-my joke was in bad taste."

—CNBC's Craig Dale, Tucker Higgins, and Kevin Breuninger contributed to this report.

How to apologize for a racist comment

Goal: Apologize for racist language that links coronavirus to Asian communities.

At a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma for his presidential re-election, President Trump made racist comments while speaking about the novel coronavirus outbreak. The president said, “China sent us the plague.” He also went on to describe the pandemic as the “kung flu,” a phrase that has been used to refer to the novel coronavirus because of its initial devastating outbreak in China. The phrase has been largely vilified by civil liberties groups that have warned that the use of monikers for the virus that link it to Asian communities can inspire racism against Asian Americans.

Since the COVID-19 outbreak has been discussed globally, the president has repeatedly referred to the virus, which is not biologically linked to any ethnicity or race, as the “Chinese virus” or the “Wuhan virus.” Previous to his rally in Tulsa, Trump has defended his use of racially-charged language to refer to the virus, linking it explicitly to China. In a briefing in March, the president argued that he uses these terms in order to be factually accurate, saying that they are “not racist at all” because “it [the virus] comes from China.” Trump has said, “I want to be accurate.”

The World Health Organization has spoken out against the use of language and terms the link the virus to China in order to avoid stigmatization. Sign this petition to urge President Trump to apologize for his use of racist language at his rally and to commit to using scientifically accurate language when speaking about the coronavirus.

Dear President Trump,

At your rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, you referred to the novel coronavirus as the “kung flu.” This language is racist and is a danger to all Asian Americans who have faced discrimination and violence in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. The term not only connects the virus to Asian people, which is factually inaccurate, as people of all races and ethnicities are at risk of contracting and spreading COVID-19, but also jokes about martial arts and Asian culture in general.

During these trying times you must seek to unite Americans, not divide. I urge you to publicly apologize for your racist language used at Tulsa and to commit to using scientifically accurate language when speaking about the coronavirus.

Professor Jason Hill has used words such as "uncivilized" and "barbaric" in tweets to describe Middle Eastern and Muslim people.

How to apologize for a racist comment

How to apologize for a racist comment

    Credibility:

CHICAGO — A group of DePaul University students are calling in a professor who used the words “barbaric” and “primitive” to describe Middle Eastern and Muslim people to apologize, but the tenured philosophy instructor said he has no plans to do so.

A coalition of student groups, including DePaul Students for Justice in Palestine, said in a Monday morning news release that Jason Hill has made “racist, anti-Palestinian, xenophobic, sexist and Islamophobic” statements in tweets and in a recent column.

The group is calling on the university to censure Hill and wants Hill to apologize and commit to sensitivity training.

“This is about one thing: How his words are very threatening and are part of a larger right-wing and white supremacist ideology that incites violence like the Christchurch massacre,” said Rifqa Falaneh, referencing last month’s shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, which left 50 Muslims dead. Falaneh is a student and spokeswoman for a coalition of DePaul student groups that want the university to take action against Hill.

Hill, who teaches philosophy and has been at DePaul for 19 years, said he hasn’t heard from the students or from university officials. But he said he “100 percent” stands by his recent column in The Federalist, a conservative news and commentary site.

How to apologize for a racist commentJason Hill

The column, called “The Moral Case for Israel Annexing the West Bank — and Beyond,” contends Israel “has the moral right to annex all of the West Bank.” The West Bank is a piece of land Israelis and Palestinians have long fought over and while many in the international community consider Israeli settlements there to be illegal, Israel continues to occupy the land.

In the column, Hill writes “only a policy of radical containment or expulsion remains a viable option” for Israel, a statement criticized by the student group.

“Professor Hill’s rhetoric is representative of a growing global far right movement that serves as inspiration for perpetrators of racist violence, such as that of the Christchurch massacre” in March in New Zealand, the group said.

Hill said the students’ concerns are “hyperbolic” and he thinks there is a “disturbing trend” of people trying to limit free speech on college campuses.

“I do think it’s a little bit over-the-top for them to have made the request to have the university go to such extreme measures to have me censured and to have me issue an apology and to have me [attend a] sensitivity training workshop,” Hill said.

Carol Hughes, a university spokesperson, noted that Hill was expressing his personal views and that his “statements do not reflect the views of DePaul University.”

But students said their campaign isn’t about freedom of speech — it’s about Hill using “threatening statements” in his writing.

“One thing the coalition [of student groups] wants to make clear is this isn’t about freedom of speech,” Falaneh said. “You can’t go in a movie theater shouting ‘fire.’ That’s illegal.

“This is not just hateful words. It’s threatening words.”

How to apologize for a racist commentCredit: Twitter DePaul University students expressed concern about tweets from Professor Jason Hill.

The students also expressed concerns about Hill’s social media posts. They collected screenshots of tweets from Hill and of messages he retweeted, saying they showed Hill “has used words such as ‘uncivilized,’ ‘barbaric’ and ‘primitive’ in his tweets to describe Middle Eastern and Muslim people.”

Hill said he wouldn’t respond to concerns about tweets because he can’t recall individual tweets and doesn’t have time to review past ones.

Students have said Hill’s commentary “creates a very unsafe environment,” and hundreds of students are opposed to the professor’s tweets and column, Falaneh said. An online petition calling for DePaul to take action against Hill has gathered 1,500 signatures, and students are also using social media to speak out against Hill.

as a palestinian student at depaul, i don’t feel welcome or safe knowing people like this teach there. this racist, gross professor needs to suffer the consequences of his actions and of these violent, discriminatory views.

— ACAB baby (@bintyafawiyeh) April 17, 2019

Hill said he does think there are countries throughout the world that are not as politically advanced as other countries, and he said Israel “is a light of democracy in a very politically primitive part of the world.”

“I’m writing as a public intellectual. I’m writing as a writer with the full authority to speak his mind,” Hill said. “This is America and I take it that it is a free country and I take it the university will uphold its obligation to defend the freedom of speech for all of its faculty and all of its student body.”

Hill said he thinks he is a part of “moral leadership” and, because of that, he thinks he has to take a “very, very firm” stance on what he thinks is right. He added that he is not concerned about his job because he has tenure.

But in the student group’s news release, the students quoted a plaque from a statue of John J. Egan and asked DePaul officials, “What are you doing for justice?”

“DePaul claims to uphold the Vincentian values of social justice, service and community; however, Professor Hill’s statements stand in direct opposition to these values,” the student group said in its news release. “It is imperative for DePaul University to condemn Professor Hill in order to reaffirm and reinstitute our mission.”

University guidelines express the principle that the university “may not restrict speech and expression simply because the ideas put forth are controversial.”

In DePaul’s response, Hughes said the school recognizes that academic freedom for faculty as well as students “must be an integral part of an intellectual institution” and that protecting that freedom “requires that we maintain an environment where the members of our university community articulate, challenge and defend their ideas; however, that does not eliminate the need for empathy and concern.”

How to apologize for a racist comment

Q. Dear Lisa,
I was recently at a small dinner party when one of the guests used an anti-Semitic slur in telling a story. Nobody (myself included) said a thing, and the rest of the night went smoothly. I took my cue from the host. Was I wrong?
— Suki, Iowa

Dear Suki,
Some say it was 18th-century philosopher Edmund Burke who came up with, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” From this we can glean two facts: (1) Burke saw how frighteningly easy it is to gloss over whatever creates discomfort, and (2) Burke was not at this dinner party.

Forget about the host. When your head hits the pillow at night, you need to know you did the right thing. In this case, you should’ve let the person finish his story and then calmly asked, “What did you mean by [fill in the anti-Semitic blank]?” Hopefully, this elicits an apology, and someone quickly brings out the chicken Marengo. If, however, the guest in question suggests you’re being overly sensitive or too politically correct, simply smile and say, “Actually, I’m the perfect amount of sensitive and just plain correct. Words matter.” Then change the subject. Turn to someone else at the table and ask about a vacation they’ve recently taken, a book they’ve read, a Nazi they’ve hunted. whatever. The rest of the evening will either go smoothly or it won’t, but not because you said the wrong thing.

Q. Dear Lisa,
Is it okay to have sex on a first date? My friend’s good friend is fixing me up, and nothing looks weird when I Google this guy. Please say yes.
— Kendra, North Dakota

Whoa there, Kendra!
It’s clear you want me to bless this potential hookup between you and Mr. Nothing Looks Weird When I Google the Guy. And grudgingly, I guess I do. But not before offering a cautionary tale. It won’t be a lecture on getting AIDS, chlamydia, HPV, or roofied—but if you don’t want to hear it, turn the page and come back to me next month.

Still here? Okay, then: My pal Marta met “he who must not be named” on a blind date. The guy was a good-looking manufacturer, originally from the Midwest, who picked a genuinely charming restaurant and ordered a decent bottle of Shiraz to boot. She invited him up; the clothes came off; a good time was had by all. And then it happened. Marta came out of the shower to find him watching TV. “Hey,” she said, “can we put the news on for a second? I just want to see whether it’ll rain tomorrow.” He looked at her as if she’d lost her mind and said, “I can’t miss The King of Queens.” He was almost indignant, adding, “Kevin James is brilliant in this one.” She thought he was kidding. He wasn’t.

Isn’t it always the way? One minute you’re glad you wore your fancy underpants; the next you’re realizing you’ve worn them for a man who believes Paul Blart, mall cop, is the Sir Anthony Hopkins of his generation.

Granted, TV compatibility isn’t mandatory in a sex partner, and another couple of dates won’t tell you whether he parks in the handicapped space or cheats on his taxes. And maybe on a cold night in North Dakota, none of that really matters to you. Fair enough, my friend—check the expiration date on your condoms and enjoy. But I still think there’s no harm in making a little more conversation before making a lot more contact.

Q. Dear Lisa,
I know this sounds crazy, but my husband has fallen in love with Eloise, our new puppy, and I’m feeling left out. What do I do?
—Charlotte, California

Yours is not the first letter I’ve received on this subject. In the interest of full disclosure, I will tell you that my husband has written me about this very issue on several occasions. He would have preferred to speak to me directly, but I was way too busy with the dog to pay him any mind.

Learn from our tender loving dysfunction: Take your husband to a pup-free zone, maybe dinner. Tell him how you feel, that you could use a little more care. Don’t whine, don’t accuse, don’t lash out, don’t assign blame—let Eloise be the bitch in the house. Believe me, Char, anytime someone new joins the family, there’s a period of adjustment. I still remember how my former sister-in-law used to chew up our slippers. The point is, this will get easier.