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How to always make your layups in basketball

This article was co-authored by Ryan Tremblay. Ryan Tremblay is a Basketball Coach and the Owner of National Sports ID and STACK Basketball. With over 30 years of experience, Ryan specializes in basketball coaching, social media marketing, and website design. Ryan created the National Sports ID as a platform to verify the age/grade of youth athletes and STACK Basketball to inspire young athletes to grow into mature individuals and basketball players. Ryan was a First Team All-Decade basketball player in Bergen County and finished in the top 20 all-time leading scorers in the county’s history with 1,730 points. He went on to Caldwell University on a basketball scholarship where he was part of three championship teams. Ryan was a two-time All-Metropolitan, All-State, and All-Conference point guard and the all-time three-point leader in the school’s history, landing him in the Caldwell University Athletic Hall of Fame.

There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 86,329 times.

Layups can be pretty hard to pull off, but if you work on your technique of laying the ball up to the sweet spot of the backboard, you’ll slowly improve your performance. Making your layups is not about being fancy, rather, its about practice and skill. It’s about setting goals and being confident. Don’t give up, commit plenty of time to practicing on your own and with others, and soon enough your technique will improve, your skill level will rise, and you’ll be making your layups regularly.

Going to the basket is one of the best ways to score in basketball. When you get shots in or around the basket there is a high likelihood of scoring OR getting fouled….and foul shots are the easiest way to score. Today we are going to go through how to make layups. So whether you are just starting out as a basketball player or you are a coach or parent looking to teach your team how to make layups. This is where you want to start!

How to Make Layups

The most basic way to finish is the one foot / one hand layup. It is one of the most basic shots in basketball, and one of the first shots people are taught in their basketball training. It is relatively simple, however there are some basics and fundamental things that are ignored and will keep you from being a great player.

Footwork & Approach

First off, as you approach the hoop you should follow the same rules you follow when dribbling. You should have your eyes up because at any time you may encounter help defense or have a teammate more open than you.

As you get close to the hoop you should take one last hard dribble then plant the inside foot, followed by launching off the outside foot. This is a simple one – two step.

Jump / Launch

When you jump it is as if your elbow and knee are connected. When your arm and the basketball go up, your knee comes up at the same time. This gives you the correct momentum & trajectory towards the hoop and it also helps you shield the ball from the defender.

One common problem young players have is jumping “out” instead of jumping “up”. Advanced players need to be able to finish regardless of where they jump from, but younger players need to focus on learning how to finish. When a player jumps “out”, this means they are jumping from too far away from the basket. This results in too much momentum and the ball ends up being thrown to hard off the backboard resulting in a missed shot. A player should try to take off from a bit closer to the hoop; we call this jumping “up”. It is more of a high jump than a long jump. Jump up, not out!

Ball Position

A common issue with layups is leaving the ball too low. This leaves it open to getting stolen by a defender. The correct mechanics is to bring the ball up off the dribble directly to the middle of your body or your outside shoulder. This is where you are the strongest with the ball and where it is most protected from the defense.

Ball Release

There are two options for finishing the layup, overhand and underhand. The underhand finish allows more control. The hand is actually underneath the ball and as you finish, you allow the ball to roll off the fingertips and then off the backboard. The overhand finish has the hand behind the ball similar to how you shoot. When you get to the backboard you push it forward gently to finish. Many younger players start with the overhand method because they have small hands and they are not yet able to do the underhand layup. That is okay, but the overhand finish can cause you to the throw the ball harder off the glass because the shooting motion combined with you running toward the hoop force the ball to go harder than it goes in the underhand method.

The finish

When you actually shoot the ball, your target should be on the sides of the square on the backboard somewhere between the middle and the top of the square.

Be sure on your layups to go up strong, but try to finish with a soft touch. Aggressive on the attack, gentle on the finish!

Good luck, be sure to leave comments and questions!

Once you have worked through these fundamentals it is time to move on to this post: Layup drills for beginners

Then you will want to master our basketball finishing layup series

About Joe Lucas

Joe Lucas is the founder of The World of Hoops. How to always make your layups in basketballHe has 25 years of experience playing basketball, training basketball players, and coaching basketball. The World of Hoops provides intelligent and intense basketball training to take basketball players to the next level.

*Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you click through, you won’t pay anything additional, but if purchase, The World of Hoops LLC will earn a small commission.

How to always make your layups in basketball

Out of all shot types in basketball, layups are some of the easiest. They can also be some of the most difficult. There are many different layup styles out there, and they range from the incredibly straightforward to the fancy and advanced. Even so, they’re all shot in the same way.

Every player will learn a layup early on in their basketball career. The following article will look at why it’s such a fundamental shot, how to shoot and improve upon it, and the different ways it’s been innovated over the years.

The Mechanics of a Layup

At its most basic, a layup is a simple shot where a player dribbling or driving towards the basket literally lays the ball up to the hoop by scooping it underhand motion at the rim or backboard. It’s much more common to use the backboard, as that increases the shot percentage.

You don’t have to use the backboard during a layup, but it’s certainly easier to make the shot than it is to try and get it directly into the hoop. The only time you want to ignore the glass is when you’re performing a layup directly at the front of the rim. In that case, just put the ball in.

3 Types of Layups

As mentioned, there are several layup types. The most basic is the overhand layup. That’s when a player softly tosses the ball off the backboard during a drive to the hoop. This can be done with either their right or left hand, but you want to use your dominant when possible.

If you don’t have the angle to use the backboard, you also have the option to shoot a finger roll. This is also shot one-handed, but rather than using the backboard you roll the basketball off your fingertips directly into the hoop. It’s difficult, but useful when you’re in the middle of the key.

Another great layup to add to your arsenal is the reverse layup. For this shot, you want to attack the basket from the right or left side and then, rather than shoot it like a normal overhand layup, you jump under the basket and “reverse” by shooting the ball from the other side.

A reverse right handed layup starts on the left side and vice versa. This is a great move for players who need a way to sneak under big men in the key or get around a tight defender.

Finally, it’s also important to understand the inside hand finish. While most layups are shot with the outside hand, the inside hand finish enables you to quickly sneak a shot up before the defender can properly react.

This move is typically only used when you’re going in from the baseline, but it’s a good way to catch your defender off guard. Keeping them on their toes when you’re driving to the basket is how you create strong offense.

How to Improve Your Layups

Knowing the different layup types is useful, but it’s a far cry from being able to do one. If you’re curious about improving your own shot, know that layups are all about touch. You don’t want to throw them up too hard, but going too soft will also likely lead to a miss.

The most important aspect to remember is that layups are always shot in motion. You’re running or dribbling to the basket, which means you have a lot of momentum. Being able to effectively pull up a bit when finishing or properly utilize your hang time is extremely important.

Planting your feet before going up for the layup is a great way to slow down momentum. It also helps to jump up rather than forward. If you do need to launch yourself at the hoop, try to bring your arms back to give yourself extra room to create a shot.

Layups are about scoring points. You might be able to get to the hoop or put on a tricky move, but if you can’t score it’s all for naught. Many players will get right to the rim and then have too much momentum and throw up an out of control shot.

If you want to improve your own layup game, it’s best to try to stay on top of your drive as much as possible. You can work on finishing as much as you want, but it won’t do you any good until you can get past your defender and effectively finish.

Final Words

Layups are one of the most iconic shots in basketball. A solid underhand finish or impressive drive is always fun to watch and perform. It might just be two points at the end of the day, but it’s two of the closest points you can score without throwing down a dunk.

No matter what layup you want to work on or shoot, as long as you start with the easier shots and work your way up you’ll have plenty of great tools to add to your repertoire.

Believe it or not, doing a layup is actually a pretty complex move. If you want to be able to do one with ease, you need to make sure that you’re doing it the right way. In this post, we’ll show you how to do a layup the right way so that you can make it look easy.

8 Steps to Follow: How to Do a Layup in Basketball in 2022

I. Find an open space on the court

Before you even attempt a layup, you need to find an open spot on the court. It can be either in the front or the back of the basket. If you’re going for a layup in the front, make sure that you’re close to the basket so that you can quickly get the ball into the hoop. If you’re going for a layup in the back, ensure that you have enough space to get the ball up and over the defender.

II. Get in a basketball stance

Once you’ve found an open spot on the court, it’s time to get into a basketball stance. It means that you should be standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly bent. It will give you the stability you need to make a layup.

III. Bend your knees and hips to get low

Now that you’re in a basketball stance, it’s time to bend your knees and hips so that you get low. It will give you the power you need to make a layup. Make sure that you’re not bending your back, as this will make it difficult to jump up and make the layup.

IV. Reach up with your opposite hand and take the ball from the dribbler

Once you’re in a low position, reach up with your opposite hand and take the ball from the dribbler. If you’re going for a layup in the front. Then make sure that you keep the ball close to your body as you go up. If you’re going for a layup in the back, make sure that you hold the ball up high so that you can quickly get it over the defender.

V. Bring the ball over your head and hold it with both hands

Bring it over your head after you have the ball in your hands. Bring your elbows together to create a solid foundation for the ball. Hold the ball with both hands and keep your palms facing down. It will give you better control of the ball and make it easier to make a layup.

VI. Jump off your left foot and extend your right leg to the side

Now it’s time to jump. Jump off your left foot and extend your right leg to the side. Make sure that you’re jumping straight up and not to the side. It will help you get more height on the layup.

VII. Swing your right arm down as you jump and propel the ball into the hoop

As you jump, swing your right arm down and propel the ball into the hoop. Make sure that you’re hitting the ball with your palm, not your fingers. It will help you make the layup more easily.

VIII. Land on your left foot and repeat

Once you’ve hit the ball into the hoop, it’s time to land. Land on your left foot and then repeat the process. Make sure that you’re landing in the same spot where you jumped from. It will help you maintain your balance and make the layup easier.

Conclusion

So there you have it, the proper way to do a layup. If you can remember and put into practice everything that we’ve talked about, then doing a layup will be easy for you. Just make sure to stay low, use your legs, and keep your hands up. And most importantly, have fun with it. Leave me a comment below and let me know how your layups are going.

This article was co-authored by Ryan Tremblay. Ryan Tremblay is a Basketball Coach and the Owner of National Sports ID and STACK Basketball. With over 30 years of experience, Ryan specializes in basketball coaching, social media marketing, and website design. Ryan created the National Sports ID as a platform to verify the age/grade of youth athletes and STACK Basketball to inspire young athletes to grow into mature individuals and basketball players. Ryan was a First Team All-Decade basketball player in Bergen County and finished in the top 20 all-time leading scorers in the county’s history with 1,730 points. He went on to Caldwell University on a basketball scholarship where he was part of three championship teams. Ryan was a two-time All-Metropolitan, All-State, and All-Conference point guard and the all-time three-point leader in the school’s history, landing him in the Caldwell University Athletic Hall of Fame.

There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 59,220 times.

The reverse layup and its variations, like the finger roll or teardrop, have been made famous by NBA all-stars like Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippin, and Stephen Curry. [1] X Research source To make this shot, you’ll need to drive across the court and shoot the ball underhand into the basket. [2] X Research source Though this may sound simple, the mechanics behind performing this move smoothly can take time and practice. After you learn how to do the reverse layup, there are ways you might improve your technique and variations you can use to make your reverse layup more versatile.

Dieser Artikel wurde von Ryan Tremblay mitverfasst . Ryan Tremblay ist ein Basketballtrainer und Inhaber von National Sports ID und STACK Basketball. Mit über 30 Jahren Erfahrung ist Ryan auf Basketball-Coaching, Social Media Marketing und Website-Design spezialisiert. Ryan schuf die National Sports ID als Plattform, um das Alter / die Klasse von Jugendsportlern zu überprüfen, und STACK Basketball, um junge Sportler dazu zu inspirieren, sich zu reifen Einzelpersonen und Basketballspielern zu entwickeln. Ryan war ein All-Decade-Basketballspieler der ersten Mannschaft in Bergen County und landete mit 1.730 Punkten in den Top 20 der besten Torschützen aller Zeiten in der Geschichte der Grafschaft. Er ging mit einem Basketballstipendium an die Caldwell University, wo er Teil von drei Meisterschaftsteams war. Ryan war zweimaliger All-Metropolitan-, All-State- und All-Conference-Point Guard und der dreifache All-Time-Leader in der Geschichte der Schule. Er landete in der Athletic Hall of Fame der Caldwell University. In diesem Artikel

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Layups können ziemlich schwer zu lösen sein, aber wenn Sie an Ihrer Technik arbeiten, den Ball bis zum Sweet Spot des Backboards zu legen, verbessern Sie langsam Ihre Leistung. Bei Ihren Layups geht es nicht darum, ausgefallen zu sein, sondern um Übung und Geschicklichkeit. Es geht darum, Ziele zu setzen und selbstbewusst zu sein. Geben Sie nicht auf, nehmen Sie sich viel Zeit, um alleine und mit anderen zu üben, und schon bald wird sich Ihre Technik verbessern, Ihr Können wird steigen und Sie werden regelmäßig Ihre Layups machen.

This article was co-authored by Ryan Tremblay. Ryan Tremblay is a Basketball Coach and the Owner of National Sports ID and STACK Basketball. With over 30 years of experience, Ryan specializes in basketball coaching, social media marketing, and website design. Ryan created the National Sports ID as a platform to verify the age/grade of youth athletes and STACK Basketball to inspire young athletes to grow into mature individuals and basketball players. Ryan was a First Team All-Decade basketball player in Bergen County and finished in the top 20 all-time leading scorers in the county’s history with 1,730 points. He went on to Caldwell University on a basketball scholarship where he was part of three championship teams. Ryan was a two-time All-Metropolitan, All-State, and All-Conference point guard and the all-time three-point leader in the school’s history, landing him in the Caldwell University Athletic Hall of Fame.

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A layup is considered the easiest shot in basketball, because it’s taken so close to the basket that odds are you’ll score every time. Since you’re moving toward the basket when making a layup, the most important part of a layup to master is the footwork. Learning how to do a layup from both the left and right side of the basket will increase your ability to score against your opponents.

It's all about touch . Work on releasing the ball softly out of your hands. You want it to hit gentle and soft. You can also work on adding spin and releasing from different angles high and low of the glass and then right and left hand on both sides of the rim .

Best advice is to google how to finger roll the ball

you can continue to go fast to the rim, but when you lay it up, remember to use ur fingers as well as ur palms. if ur ball is constantly hitting off the board, u are most likely only using ur palms. if u wanna lay it soft only with ur palms, then u need to be slow at the rim. which i think is not possible if u are already blowing past ur defender at a speed. concentrat on ur fingers and the timing of ur release.

The ball is traveling as fast as you are. The faster you are going the more you’ll have to take the speed off the ball by the touch you put on the layup.

When you are running full speed you basically have to throw the ball backwards relative to your body to lay it off the glass. How old are you? Whats your hand size. How comfortable are you with a finger roll?

Get good loft on the ball as well, and try not to let the ball hit the glass on its way up

Don’t “shoot” the layup… just lift it out you hand and your momentum will do the layup for you.

Yes figure out how to make ur legs move fast but your arms and hands move slow. Also just practice lay ups forever. You will figure out how to make the ball bounce diagonally right into the hoop no matter how fast it comes off the back board

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You gotta lay it softly. Don't be scared to be blocked, it happens to everyone. But this also means you use other methods such as initiating body to body contact to avoid getting blocked.

Finger roll. Work on that.

You need to work on your touch. A quick fix is starting your layups by jumping up not forward. this will reduce your forward momentum a bit and also the ball’s.

You should also take the time in your drills and practice to find the best angle for you to take at the board when making your layups, when you do this you should always try to recreate this finish in order to score consistently.

Also, strengthen your legs, deceleration is just as important as acceleration in basketball.

This article was co-authored by Ryan Tremblay. Ryan Tremblay is a Basketball Coach and the Owner of National Sports ID and STACK Basketball. With over 30 years of experience, Ryan specializes in basketball coaching, social media marketing, and website design. Ryan created the National Sports ID as a platform to verify the age/grade of youth athletes and STACK Basketball to inspire young athletes to grow into mature individuals and basketball players. Ryan was a First Team All-Decade basketball player in Bergen County and finished in the top 20 all-time leading scorers in the county’s history with 1,730 points. He went on to Caldwell University on a basketball scholarship where he was part of three championship teams. Ryan was a two-time All-Metropolitan, All-State, and All-Conference point guard and the all-time three-point leader in the school’s history, landing him in the Caldwell University Athletic Hall of Fame.

There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 59,220 times.

The reverse layup and its variations, like the finger roll or teardrop, have been made famous by NBA all-stars like Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippin, and Stephen Curry. [1] X Research source To make this shot, you’ll need to drive across the court and shoot the ball underhand into the basket. [2] X Research source Though this may sound simple, the mechanics behind performing this move smoothly can take time and practice. After you learn how to do the reverse layup, there are ways you might improve your technique and variations you can use to make your reverse layup more versatile.

How to always make your layups in basketball

Basketball is one of the most widely played games these days and with the trend going on, people are more and more taking up the prospect of getting into the game as a professional.

Many people want to adapt the game as a profession as it has immense fame and has a pretty solid return of money as well in regards to the financial terms of the contracts that are offered to the players over the course of their careers. Particularly in America, the game is played very widely and passionately and given much more importance over the other games. This game has the fame because it is a very fast pace game and a true check of an athletes credibility. With such money involved in the game, many children are lining it up as their main motive to excel in and have already made it as their first choice option. There are certain parameters of the game which need to be mastered in order for one to become a true basketball player and a layup is one of these important parameters.

Along with shooting and passing, each player must have the ability to perform a layup in the match as the conditions are not always favourable in the game for the player to consider and pick their own choice of scoring option. These are the steps that will guide you through the task of performing a layup in the game of basketball.

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Instructions

The first step is to stand outside the D of the rink on which you are looking to perform the layup.

Now you should be looking to make a rough estimate on the numbers of step that you need before going into the air after taking the jump for the layup

Now you have to ask your trainer to throw you the ball in your hands. The ball can be thrown in two ways. One is to be thrown straight into your hands while the other option is that the ball is to be given to you after a bounce and is taken after that bounce on the court.

After the catch, you will be required to dribble the ball on the court and these dribbles must be made while running towards the basket loop. After one or two dribbles, you have to make the jump towards the rim of the basket.

Now when you are at the top of your jump, you have to outstretch your arm that holds the basketball and lave the ball in the direction of the basket so that the ball drops into it.

Im a 14-year-old basketball player, and I've been playing for about 3-4 years. I don't know why, but I always miss the easiest layup, it's not because I'm a bad player or anything it's just I get nervous or something. Especially in real games, always miss the easy layups. I remember missing an open layup in a real game one time, it was so embarrassing. Any tips on how to stop missing?

i feel ya, it happens to all of us. you gotta practice those ingame situations, not just plain layups. and you definitely have to get used to them. try slowing down the last two steps before your layup. that's what i always did and it helped me not overpower my layup

This works, but the slowdown can cause you to get blocked. I like to slow down in the air. I know that sounds dumb, but it works for me. Everyone slows down a good bit on take off and the layup is easy as pie at that point.

So is it "always miss", or "remember missing one time"? Even best players misses half of their shots and many easy shots as well. You will never stop missing as long as you play. Main objective is improving field goal percentage and getting rid of fear to shoot. You should practice layups a lot, they should become automatic from whatever angle, side, speed dribble/static, hand.

I guess missing one more time, but I feel like missing an open layup even like 2 times in a game is not good.

Ive missed easy layups in official games. It happens.

But really you just have to go to the basket and make layups. For hours.

Just stand below the basket and make a layup right, catch the ball, make one step, make a layup left, catch the ball, make one step, make a layup, repeat.

You can go back to situations youve been in or youve seen in NBA games (as ridiculus as they may be) and just simulate them.

Even if you play pick up, make more layups.

Focus on putting it on the backboard and it will definitely go in. Practice so it becomes mechanical. Aim at the same place of the backboard.
Also keep in mind that when driving hard and with power to the basket, it is more likely to have more power at the end and that leads to a harder finish.
Practice in all conditions and learn how to be balanced on the final try.

It's crazy how easy layups become with enough practice. Can just sit there for an hour throwing layups from all sorts of directions and angles and hit like 95% of them

Do 100 from each side per day with your buddy chasing you.

Mikan drills, have your buddy hit you with a pool noodle while doing them.

Just take it slow. If you’re open there’s no need to rush your shot. Focus on your fundamentals, hit it off the back board & score the basket. Watch some Tim Duncan highlights and try to learn from his movement and tendencies, you’ll pick up a lot of subtle tips that’ll help you.

be more confident in your ability, if you know you're good then play at your ability and don't get nervous. if you miss then you miss, just try to make the next one.

Take the ball in like you mean it every time. Don’t try to throw the ball up there, try to meet at the rim and keep your left arm going up with the ball until you are close to release.

Having your left arm go up at the beginning of the shot will be a deterrent for the defender and it’s one more thing they have to get through to block the ball. I usually try to have my left arm end up at my shoulder height to deter any defenders. A small push off won’t be noticed if it’s needed to get the defense off of you.

Dont layup shoot half courts instead

Practice at speed.

Pay attention to your footwork – its shocking how many "ballers" cant control their feet, asking players do the most simple thing of jumping off the right foot for a left hand layup (or vice versa) can result in some interesting situations. But players I see being rushed can often just muddle their feet up, shuffle, get into wrong angles, do things like jumping off same foot same hand which is far less athletic (and if you already struggle with layups, making it harder wont help).

Work on simple things first. Can you go left and right 45o angle, can you go across the rim (mikan style) using the right feet, then go reverse under the rim using the right feet and dribble.

Then get a buddy, start him behind you right on your shoulder, and beat him to the rim for a layup doing the same process as above.

Having the core fundamentals just means your core is solid, and from there you can add levels (against pressure, in games etc).

This is a reverse layup tutorial we I show exactly how to make these kind of layups in basketball http BallerBootCamp com sww Free Workout http Instagram com BallerBootCamp Follow Me http BallerBootCamp com Itunes Sub To My Podcast So many shorter players these days figure that the only way they can finish inside against taller players is to shoot floaters I ve actually found that reverse layups are also a great and much higher percentage way to finish with bigs around you In this reverse layup tutorial I not only explain exactly how to make reverse layups but I give examples of two different ways to shoot a reverse layup The first one is just a regular reverse where you shoot the ball with your left hand on the left side of the basket and vice versa The next way that I show is what I call the quot Goofy Reverse Layup quot With this one you are shooting the ball with your right hand on the left side of the basket and vice versa In the tutorial I explain that you need to be able to do both because your footwork will be different depending on whatever moves you make to get to that point of finishing so you need to be able to use both hands At the end I get into other basketball tips such as making sure you get the ball high off the glass as well as some tips on how to use spin to make the shot go in I hope you like this tutorial and if you think I missed any tips how how to shoot a reverse layup let me know in the comments more about at Reverse Layup Tutorial How To Make Reverse Layups In Basketball

Before learning the vast amount of different shots in basketball, all youth basketball players need to learn how to shoot a basic layup first. A layup is the easiest shot to learn and most of the points in youth basketball comes from making a layup.

Before shooting the layup, you get to take 2 steps towards the basket without the referee calling a traveling violation on you.

Therefore, step with your right foot first, then jump off of your left foot elevating the right knee as high as you can when attemping a right-handed layup. The opposite applies if you are attempting to shoot a left-handed layup; first step will be with your left foot, then take off with your right foot, elevating your left knee up.

All basketball players, especially youth basketball players, must utilize the backboard when they attempt a layup. To use the backboard try to hit the top corner on the square that is on the side you shoot the layup with the basketball. Therefore, if you are attempting to shoot a right-handed layup, try to have the basketball hit the top right hand corner of the square on the backboard. If you are attempting a layup on the left side of the basket, try to hit the top left-hand corner of the square on the backboard.

Try to learn how to use the hand of the side you are on. Therefore, utilize your right hand when shooting a right-handed layup while utilizing the left hand to make a left-handed layup.

At first it can be difficult to develop coordination to shoot a layup on both sides of the basket. However, please not get discouraged if you have trouble maintaining the correct footwork and shot for a layup. Hard work will always prevail at the end.

Making a basketball layup in the heat of competition is tough for young players!

Learn how to shoot a basketball layup at game speed with these simple basketball tips.

There are other basic shots every player needs to learn how to shoot.

Sink a Basketball Layup at Game Speed

1. Keep your head up while dribbling

Keep your eyes on the target

2. Dribble with the hand away from the defense

As a general rule, when you dribble on the right side of the court, you should use your right hand. When you dribble on the left side, use your left hand.

Usually, your defender is between you and the basket, so you want to use your outside hand to keep the ball out of her reach.

How to always make your layups in basketball

3. Plant the foot opposite your shooting hand and push upward off the ground when you hop.

You need to plant your inside foot and transfer your motion immediately from going forward to going straight up.

If your body continues moving forward, you will likely end up too far under the basket.

4. Don't get caught too far under the basket

You should take off somewhere near the block. If you get too far under, you won't be able to lay the ball up off the backboard, and it will probably hit underneath the rim.

5. Bring the non-dribbling hand to the ball

This will help protect the ball from the defender.

How to always make your layups in basketball

6. Lift the ball up with both hands to protect it

As you extend your arm, your right hand will lift it up past your ear and into full arm extension.

7. Center the shooting hand on the back of the ball

The non-shooting hand should be on the side of the ball.

8. The palm of your shooting hand should face the backboard

9. Shoot with the hand farthest from the defense

When you shoot a lay-up on the right side of the court, use your right hand. When you shoot on the left side, use your left hand. Usually, your defender is between you and the basket, so if you shoot with your outside hand, you will be able to protect your shot with your non-shooting hand. If you shoot with your inside hand, your defender will have no trouble blocking your shot.

How to always make your layups in basketball

10. Release the ball at the top of your jump

11. Extend your arm completely

Release the ball off your fingertips with a flex of the wrist.

12. See the ball go in the basket after taking your shot.

13. Always use the backboard unless you are driving down the middle or the baseline.

14. Lay the ball up high and soft off the backboard

It's easy with all the excitement and adrenaline flowing to shoot the ball too hard so that it smacks off the backboard.

How to always make your layups in basketball

If you’re trying to stand out and be more effective as a basketball player, learning how to draw more fouls is a no brainer.

Here are four tips to help you take advantage of your opponents and get them in foul trouble.

Attack the basket

Don’t get me wrong… this doesn’t mean that by attacking the basket you are guaranteed to get a foul call.

But, what it does mean is that your chances of getting fouled are much higher.

The majority of fouls are called through players attacking the basket… and for good reason.

When so close to the hoop, it’s much more difficult to prevent the offense from scoring without illegal contact.

Some players may shy away from physical contact and driving to the hoop to score.

However, by doing that you miss out not only on a chance to draw more fouls, but also easy points at the free throw line.

Take advantage of defenders’ momentum

By being aware of your opponent’s momentum and taking advantage of it, you can draw fouls and get and-one buckets as you attack the basket.

This is a skill that will make you a huge threat on offense.

The classic example:

If a defender is chasing you as you jump to finish with a layup, decelerate so that their momentum causes them to bump into you.

Even though you have partially caused this, the foul is still on them as the defensive player.

Another way to do this is by using a pump fake, since this can cause a defender to jump towards you.

As this happens, jump into them and shoot as they are on their way down to draw contact and get the referee to call a foul.

Be careful though.

The further away from the basket you try to use this pump fake trick, the less likely the ref is to reward you and call a foul.

(It usually works best at a close distance to the basket)

How to always make your layups in basketball

Protect the ball as much as possible

Try to get in the habit of keeping the ball protected at all times.

This will help you to draw more fouls in a less direct way over the course of a game.

Although you aren’t actively doing something to lure your defender into a foul, this is still a great tendency to practice.

As defenders swipe at the ball, they’ll hack at you and make illegal contact. (This also prevents you from turning the ball over)

Here are three ways to make a habit of keeping the ball protected when playing basketball:

  • Whenever holding the ball with two hands, keep a firm grip on it
  • Protect the ball when dribbling by using your non-dribbling hand to shield from attempts to swipe the ball
  • Put you body in between your defender and the ball when under pressure

Draw fouls when YOU are the defender

As a lockdown defender, your focus is usually on trying to prevent your opponent from scoring without fouling.

However, YOU can also draw an offensive foul on your opponent as a defender.

When defending a player driving to the basket (especially if they are particularly aggressive), shuffle your feet to quickly cut them off and “beat them to the spot”.

If you do this correctly, absorbing the contact with your body (not blocking them with your hands), the referee will call a ‘charging foul’ on the offensive player.

It’s often safest to fall on the floor after this to help take the impact, which can also help to “sell the foul” to the ref.

HOWEVER…

If the ref believes you haven’t shuffled your feet quick enough and didn’t establish your position, they won’t call a foul.

Even worse, they might call a “blocking foul” on you.

Absorbing contact with your body is always great defense, but only fall over and try to “sell the foul” if you are sure that you should get the call.

And… if all this is getting confusing, here’s a visual demonstration of NBA player Marcus Smart drawing offensive fouls:

Rather than trying to do all of these things at once, give each skill the attention it deserves and focus on them one at a time.

With practice, you’ll be able to draw more fouls on the court at each opportunity, making you a big problem for opponents.

Layups are considered the easiest shot in basketball, however, there are a lot of factors, I would argue, that are making it a difficult shot.

Luckily, our quick guide will have you making almost every lay up. Follow our steps and practice and you’ll get this shot down.

I would contend that even though you are the closest to the basket, this shot has some added factors that make it difficult. Usually, big men lurk in the paint, so if you beat a guy on the perimeter, there will be someone even larger waiting there.

There is also the scenario of getting an open court steal and heading presumably alone towards the basket. I believe this adds pressure and an on-stage type of feeling.

There are more ways layups can be difficult, but you get the idea.

Let’s get better at making layups!

Knee and Elbow Harmony

The first part of making layups consistently is having the correct footwork. No matter which side of the basket you are approaching, your same side elbow should “tied” to your knee.

As you take the ball up towards the basket, your elbow “pulls” the same side knee up.

This will encourage you to jump off of the correct foot each time.

It’s important to have this harmony and to practice it regularly. The reason we take off-balance shots is bad footwork. We want our bodies used to the idea of going up with the proper hand on the proper side.

So, you’re going to have to get used to using your off hand and perfect layups using it. No excuses.

If you’re having trouble, double the practice time on the off hand.

Once you have the elbow and knee working in unison, you’ll be ready for the next step.

The Corner Is Everything

When you look up at the basket, you’ll see a white or red box painted or taped onto the backboard. Not simply decoration, this is a guide for making any shots using the backboard.

How to always make your layups in basketball

In the case of layups, use the top corner every time. Every time.

It might seem easier to use the middle, or you may have been taught other things to look for, however, the corner of this box will lead to more made layups.

It will also lead to fewer shots being blocked.

Being a little higher on the glass gives you more air under the shot and will hopefully keep defenders from blocking the shot.

Practice making all of your layups using this corner, no matter the angle, no matter the situation.

Once you are familiar with hitting that spot, you’ll be ready for the next step.

Eyes Up!

Now that you have the basic form down and you are hitting the right spot on the backboard, you’re noticing that you need to get your eyes up to the goal when approaching. You have to see the spot, right?

Your eyes will always be up in basketball, and the best place to start learning that is by having them looking where your target will be. The biggest error people make when trying to make layups is that they keep their head down until they get to the basket.

This leads to not knowing where you are in relation to the basket and it leads to not having your footwork correct.

Not only should you practice dribbling with your head up, but you also have to finish at the rim that way too. Find the corner of the box on the backboard as soon as you can, this will lead to your body naturally finding the best way to get there.

It will become second nature with practice!

Coordination Is Key

The only way to consistently make layups is to develop the coordination necessary to make them consistently. Once you have mastered the techniques above, you’ll find your layups falling in regularly.

There are a lot of different types of layups that we will discuss in further posts, but they involve attacking the basket at different angles and with different arm positions.

One of the most dominant and beautiful shots in all of basketball is the floater, a big man killer that is devastating in the right hands. Stay tuned!

How to always make your layups in basketball

Conclusion

I promised you a quick guide and these three steps will give you the upper hand to making all of your layups.

  • Footwork with elbow and knee “tied” together
  • Find the corner on the backboard
  • Eyes up!

Once you have these perfected you can move on to more advanced layups and moves.

It takes a serious amount of practice to overcome the hurdles of making layups regularly, but once you do, it will become the easiest shot!

Don’t forget to check out our recommendations for the best equipment and gear to help make you an elite player.

Thanks for reading and we want to hear if you have had any struggles when it comes to layups? What did you do to overcome these struggles? Let us know below!

I don’t think there’s a coach in the country that hasn’t been frustrated by players missing lay ups. So this article will give you some simple ways to cut down on missed lay ups and get players finishing at a higher percentage!

Here are 3 simple things you can do to make more lay ups.

1) Make it Realistic – No More Lay Up Lines!

Travel around the country and you’ll see thousands of pre-game warm ups and practices with players shooting lay ups in the traditional lay up lines. But is this really what happens in a game? How often does a player get to start right from the wing area, get 2 or 3 dribbles, and then get an uncontested lay up at the basket?

If you are really lucky that might happen one time per game. The rest of the lay ups will occur at odd angles. maybe directly to the basket, maybe from the corner, or maybe another angle. But rarely do players get the perfect angle from the wing. So why do we always shoot lay ups from there?

Instead, make lay up drills more realistic. Change the number of dribbles that players require to get the basket, change angles, and do what you can to simulate what actually happens in a game.

2) Add Competition

Again, how often do players get uncontested lay ups? In a real game they are rushed, have limited steps they can take, and often get contested near the basket from the help defenders.

Using drills like corner finishing make things more realistic and help players learn how to finish in a game.

It’s no wonder players have trouble finishing. They usually don’t get to practice the way they play. So in a game, it feels completely different.

We have found that the competitive finishing drills found on this DVD have made a big difference in our players’ abilities to make lay ups and finish in games.

3) Use Multi-Purpose Drills

We all know there just isn’t enough time in the day to get everything done. So use multi-purpose drills that incorporate lay ups and a variety of skills. With a little thought and effort, you can incorporate lay ups and some type of finishing aspect in almost all the drills that you do.

For example, in your shooting drills, you can have players rebound their own misses and finish at the basket. When running ballhandling drills with cones or chairs, have guys shoot lay ups each time down the court. Or when practicing ball screens, have guys finish at the basket and add a help defender to contest the shot.

Start on the right elbow of the basketball key (this is the point where the free throw line and the lane line intersect, it is approximately 10 feet away from the basket) with the basketball. Dribble the ball twice with your right hand toward the basket in preparation for a right handed layup. When you reach the area right inside the block jump off of your inside (or left foot). Simultaneously, your right hand and right knee should be raised in unison (imagine there is a string tied between your right knee and right elbow. when your elbow goes up your knee comes up), delivering the ball off the top corner of the backboard and through the hoop.

Step 2

Move to the left elbow of the basketball key (this is the point where the free throw line and the lane line intersect, it is approximately 10 feet away from the basket) with your basketball. Dribble the ball twice with your left hand toward the basket in preparation for a left handed layup. When you reach the area right inside the block jump off of your inside (or right foot). Simultaneously, your left hand and left knee should be raised in unison (imagine there is a string tied between your right knee and right elbow. when your elbow goes up your knee comes up), delivering the ball off the top corner of the backboard and through the hoop.

Step 3

Tips for making layups. First, Always aim for the top corner of the square on the side of the backboard that your shooting at. If you can hit the corner, you will make the majority of your layups. Second, always look at your target and keep your eyes focused on the place you want the ball to go. Third, remember to jump upwards instead of outward. The more vertical you jump the better chance you have of delivering the ball where you want it to go.

Step 4

Practice! Layups are one of the easiest skills to practice, all you need is a ball and a hoop. Set a goal for yourself (ex. try to make 10 right handed layups in a row and then 10 left landed layups without missing) and try to improve on your goal every time you practice.

How to always make your layups in basketball

Knowing how to shoot a basketball is one of if not THE #1 most important basketball fundamentals.

But if you’re a coach or you have ever worked with youth players and tried to teach the layup then you know how tricky that can be.

…Example of a coach who hasn’t read this:

“You simply jump off of your left foot and shoot it off the backboard.”

…Kid tries to do it and travels, jumps off the wrong foot, and the ball puts a hole in the backboard.

How to always make your layups in basketball

I remember being that coach and that exact same thing happening to me with about 40 different kids time and time again at a huge camp I worked at.

So before the next camp I went and talked to the the camp director/basketball gipsy, Gene Cotter, lol. (He calls himself that too, so I can say that, but honestly the guys more of a basketball genius.)

He gave me some great tips on how to teach the layup and that’s what I’m going to share with you today.

But first lets go over the different types of layups.

Different Releases

Finger Roll

This is when you finish the layup underhanded. This is how I recommend you finish a layup anytime you are not going to be using the backboard.

For example, you are attacking straight at the hoop and can’t use the backboard.

You can also use a finger roll when using the backboard, but I don’t start out teaching regular layups this way.

Over Hand

This is when you shoot the layup similarly to a jump shot. You put your hand under the basketball, jump up, and extend as high as possible into the finish.

This is how I teach a player how to shoot a layup when they are first starting to learn.

The reason behind that is that they probably have shot the basketball before and did it overhand of course so that is what feels most natural to them in the beginning.

Types Of Layups

One Foot Layups

These are just the basic layups that we all learned as youngsters and now hope our players never miss 😉

Here is the complete breakdown on how to teach and shoot a layup:

Here are some different ways to finish that can be done off of one foot:

Two Foot Layups

These are also referred to as “Power Layups.”

There are different ways you can shoot a two footed layup, but I’m just going to breakdown the jump stop layup.

There are a few things to keep in mind when shooting this:

  • Jump off of one foot and land on two.
  • Have both feet hit the ground at the same time.
  • Land with your shoulders parallel to the backboard.
  • Use shot fakes if shot blockers are around.
  • This is not a jump shot, make sure you jump up and finish high.

Here are some different ways to finish that can be done off of two feet:

Reverse Layups

These can be done off of one or two feet, but the fundamentally sound way to shoot a reverse layup is off of one foot.

Reverse layups are a great way to keep the defense guessing.

Most shot blockers are looking to block you on the strong side so by taking one more dribble on finishing on the other side of the basket can turn a contested layup into and easy reverse layup.

Also, a reverse layup is much harder to block due to you moving away from the defense instead of towards them as well as the rim being in the way of the shot blocker.

Here is a few tips on how to execute this off one foot:

  • Use the same right-left footwork as you would with a normal layup.
  • Jumping too early or too late will make the shot more difficult.
  • Learn how to use the spin to make the shot soft.
  • Look up so you can see what you’re doing.

Which hand should you shoot it with?

Will it really depends on the situation. You can’t always time your steps in the games so you need to be able to finish with both hands on both sides of the hoop.

If you shoot with your left hand on the left side of the hoop you should jump off your right foot and vice versa on the other side. I call that a regular reverse layup.

If you shoot with your right and on the left side of the hoop you should jump off your left foot and vice versa on the other side. I call that a goofy reverse layup.

I'm a middle aged guy without any structured playing experience who has been comfortably playing bad/mediocre pickup basketball throughout my life without much issue. "I'm just here to get my heart rate up. "

Last month, I found out that for layups, I'm supposed to jump off my non shooting side and that I have been doing it wrong for 30 some years. I'm right handed and had been jumping off with my right foot. For the last month or so, I've been training my brain to do it differently and MOST of the time I remember to lead with my right foot and jump off with my left foot and honestly, it feels much more balanced.

The problem is when I don't have a clear path to the basket and have to fake, post, or do hook shots and such, I have kind of forgotten how to jump! If I'm left of the basket and my left foot is the pivot, sometimes it'd be much faster to just jump off my right foot and save a step but now I don't know if that's the right thing to do or am I always supposed to jump off with the left? Or is that mostly just for doing a layup while you're running and doesn't apply to posting or gadget type of plays?

I'm sure this is stuff that anybody who has played middle school or high school ball knows but again, I'm just a "gym guy" so any guidance would be appreciated.

Unless you’re on a breakaway all by yourself, almost every layup you will take as a basketball player will be contested in some form or another. Because of that, you need to do as many basketball drills as possible so that you can make those tough layups. The Mikan Drill is a great way to practice these shots. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Start underneath the basketball, facing the backboard.
  2. Begin by going to the left, taking a small step with your left foot followed by a big step with your right foot. Drive up with your left knee and take the layup with your lefthand.
  3. Catch the ball as it is coming out of the net, then repeat by going to the other side. Take a small step with your right foot, then a big step with your left, then power up with your right knee before laying the ball in with your right hand.

When you’re doing the Mikan drill, be sure to keep your arms up and your elbows out so that you can be stronger when you’re holding the ball. This will make it much harder for players to knock the ball out of your hand in traffic. Also make sure to rotate your wrist in as you shoot the ball because this will help give the ball spin in the right direction off the backboard. If you rotate your wrist the wrong way then the ball will bounce straight back off the glass without coming near the basket. The Mikan Drill is an effective basketball drill is because it gives you a lot of repetitions without taking a long time. It’s easy to do, and you get immediate feedback about if you’re doing it right based on whether or not you make the layup. There are other basketball drills that can help you with your scoring drills, though, like the Form Shooting Drill. If you’re still having trouble with layups in traffic, or you want some new basketball drills to work on, you can always contact one of our private coaches.

How to always make your layups in basketball

Shooting layups is a complex skill. What makes a layup complex is the perception action coupling process. Perceptual layups practice drills are designed to account for this process within the practice.

Basically the perception action coupling process is the coordination of visual perception in an environment and movement required to achieve an action such as a layup. In a layup example a basketball player cannot escape the information coming to them from their game or practice environment.

Perceptions and Decisions Involved in Shooting Layups

  1. Defender(s)
  2. Teammate(s)
  3. Distance (From basket, from teammate/defender, to jump forward or upwards)
  4. Angle (From basket, from body)
  5. Release point (Above, below or outside body)
  6. Technique (Preparatory phase, wind-up phase, force phase, landing phase)
  7. Visual Focus (Backboard, rim, defender)
  8. To Draw or Avoid Contact

For better players, an improved perception action coupling will mean that they are able to produce a more appropriate movement for the task. Here is an example of the perceptual lay-up explained using a game example:

The Problem with How we Practice Shooting Layups

As you can see in the example the speed and timing of the layup, plus the distracting information that the defense and environment provide are all difficult to simulate in practice. A number of one-on-one drills exist that can create a more realistic layup practice situation.

Here is a sample one-on-one drill that gives the advantage to the offense, so shooting layups will result, but the defense is present so there is distracting information and visual cues to attune to.

I encourage you to use these one-on-drills, of course, but I want to address the on air component of practicing shooting layups.

As a general observation too much on air layup practice takes place at most levels of basketball. Seriously, go search YouTube for layup drills and you will find the majority of them are blocked training routines, rather than game-like training drills.

Why is that a problem?

The problem in practicing the layup on air is that focusing on the action of shooting a layup can only account for so much improvement.

The skill of shooting a layup is not inherently difficult. What is difficult is the perception action coupling solution a player must come up with under game conditions. What type of layup to shoot relative to their position on the floor, and the position of their teammates, and any defenders in their path all impact the success of the layup.

Make On Air Layup Practice More Game-Like

Rather than having a player practice layups as routines or scripts to follow, make any layup drill more random and variable. This will make the layup practice more game-like by requiring a player to come up with a unique solution on each shot attempt.

Why is this valuable?

If a player does blocked practice of the same layup over and over again, mental effort is reduced because the player would have memorized exactly what is required of them for each shot. The game is random and messy, and involves considerable mental effort, so simulating that within your layup drills is paramount to developing creative and effective layup finishers.

You can block practice during the initial introductory teaching phase of any layup, but to work beyond that point it is best to use random practice. Here is an example of randomizing the traditional blocked routine of the Mikan Drill so that a player is required to come up with a unique solution on each shot.

Why Perceptual Layups?

Since the game is messy, and requires unique solutions on each layup attempt, I wanted to create a layup practice drill that simulates this. The basic understanding of why relates to the decision-making process. The skill of shooting a layup is always preceded by the perception and decision process.

Here’s what we know about skill execution. Skill execution is preceded by perceptions and decisions.

Skill execution follows this process

  1. Perception
  2. Decision
  3. Action
  4. Feedback

Perception and decisions are more important to the layup process.

Why? Because if a player perceives the correct information on their layup, and makes the right decision about shooting the ball, the percentage likelihood of making the shot increases. If a player perceives the wrong information, and/or makes the wrong decision about shooting the ball, they are less likely to make the shot regardless of their skill expertise.

So instead of practicing layups on air, I suggest using the perceptual layups concept in the video below.

On every shot attempt a player has to first perceive the defender, followed by the target (basket or backboard). This is followed by a player making the decision of where and when to shoot the ball. All of this leads to a player actually executing the foot placement and ball release to shoot the ball at the target.

Of course the end of this process is feedback on the result. Did they score, draw a foul or miss, and based on the result what would they do differently. Make sure when you do this drill players are cutting to the basket from different locations relative to the basket to work on approaching and shooting layups from different positions on the court.

Perceptual Layup Finishing Drill

Interested in more information about how to progress and add to layers of challenge to perceptual layups?

Check out the Advanced Perceptual Layup Concepts video in the membership area.

I've seen videos of people changing their layup whilst mid-air, for example: https://youtu.be/0-Z6udfNiUw?t=20s I've attempted to try a few things like that but I always seem to fall down before I have time to adjust it, how can I practice to be able to do layups like these?

Don’t spend time on this yet. Work on fundamentals first like how to make a proper layup with both hands.

acrobatic layups has little to do with standard layup. it's more about the feel and you can't just let go of the ball or throw the ball up softly like you would in a normal layup.

changing shot mid air usually requires alot more strength on the lower arm, wrist & fingers (for the extra spin). height & vertical + horizontal jump gives you the extra advantages.

so far only MJ & Rose are good at this and it's always risky because defenders don't know what you are doing and they make hasty decision.

Practice practice practice. Learn one of these at a time. They difficult part about these layups is knowing when to use them, and making them at full speed. Develop your own acrobatic layup, and practice making it at full speed over and over. Take a break. Shoot some free throws or something, then go back to practicing. Once you can make 6 or 7 in a row you’re ready to try the layup in a game situation.

The one I would recommend starting with is the windmill layup

How do I develop my own acrobatic layup?

1st of all you need enough hang time to have enough time to change your shots mid air.

2nd you only change your shot when there's defender going for the block. what you do is simply avoid the shot blocker's arms and throw the ball up via any opening angles you see. takes alot of trial to figure out the mechanics.

the windmill is a good way of doing it because the spin compensates the lack of vertical momentum that you lost because you released the shot late and allows you to go from 1 side to the other. but if you do it too often defense can read it and go for an easy block so if you see another guy waiting to block you after you change your shot, remember there's at least 2 guys guarding you so that leaves 1 of your teammate open.

Introduction: How to Make a Layup! (with Both Hands!)

As two people who have always loved playing basketball. We have never been able to find a great set of instructions that explain how to make a simple lay-up! That’s when we thought. let’s make an instructable that tells you how!

Supplies

What you will need:

Basketball (28.5 of 29.5) Basketball hoop (with a backboard)

Step 1: Determine What Size Ball to Use

These instructions will work for any size ball, but the size does matter when you are playing basketball at a competitive level. You also want to practice with the same size you would actually use!

· If you are a girl you will want to use a 28.5” size ball (also known as, girl’s ball).

· If you are under the age of 14 you will want to use a 28.5” ball.

· If you are a male over the age of 14 you will want to use a 29.5” ball.

If you aren’t sure where to find the size, you can see on this picture where the size indication is generally located on a basketball. If you do not see a size, this will generally indicate it is a men’s ball!

Step 2: Are You Right or Left Handed?

Are you right or left-handed?

Before we begin teaching you how to make a lay-up, we want you to use your strong hand! It will be easier to learn and you will also be more accurate with it. Once you have your dominate handed (right or left) lay-up mastered you can try the other hand! Before you know it, you will be making lay-ups with both hands!

If you are right-handed, we will start teaching you how to make a lay-up right away! If you are left-handed, you can skip to the instructions on how to make a left-handed lay-up. Then come back here after you have mastered the left-hand!

Step 3: Where to Start

To teach you the basics of the lay-up, we will start about 5 feet away from the hoop. If you are on a basketball court, you can start on the right block.

Also, make sure you are turned towards the hoop like in the picture!

Step 4: The Footwork

Before you can dive right in to making your first lay-up, it is important that you know the proper footwork. This is important so that your lay-up is legal, and not called a travel in games!

First picture: Standing at the right block with your feet together, you will step with your right foot

Second picture: And then take another step with your left foot

Third picture: Once you take your left step, you will raise your right leg and jump off of your left foot!

Step 5: Bringing Your Hands With!

Once you have mastered that footwork and are jumping towards the basket, we can talk about what to do with your hands!

Because you are shooting a right-handed lay-up, we are going to extend your right hand as high as you can! This means you will take the steps, jump, and finally extend your right hand as high as you can!

Step 6: Adding in the Ball!

Now that you are in your starting position, have your footwork mastered, and know what to do with your hands… you are ready to make the lay-up!

Hold the ball in both hands, and put all of the steps together.

When you jump off of your left foot be sure to extend your right hand towards the backboard as seen in the picture!

Push the ball UP towards the backboard!

Step 7: Where to Aim the Ball

To make your lay-up the most consistently, you are going to want to aim for the backboard. When you push the ball out of your hands you want the ball to hit the square, and bounce into the hoop.

Aim for the top corner of the white square!

Step 8: Practice, Practice, Practice!

Like everything in life, practice makes perfect. Now that you know the basics to making a lay-up, you can practice the speed you shoot it, the speed of your footwork, and even the spin you put on the ball!

Now that you have mastered the right-handed lay-up. it is time to practice your left-handed lay-up!

Step 9: Left-Hand Where to Start

To teach you the basics of the left-handed lay-up, we will start about 5 feet away from the hoop. If you are on a basketball court, you can start at the left block.

Step 10: Left-Hand – the Footwork

Before you can dive right in to making your first lay-up, it is important that you know the proper footwork. This is important so that your lay-up is legal, and not called a travel in games!

Picture 1: Standing at the left block with your feet together, you will step with your left foot

Picture 2: And then take another step with your right foot

Picture 3: Once you take your right step, you will raise your left leg and jump off of your right foot!

Step 11: Left-Hand – Bringing Your Hands With!

Once you have mastered that footwork and are jumping towards the basket, we can talk about what to do with your hands!

Because you are shooting a left-handed lay-up, we are going to extend your left hand as high as you can!

Step 12: Left-Hand – Adding the Ball!

Now that you are in your starting position, have your footwork mastered, and know what to do with your hands… you are ready to make the lay-up!

Hold the ball in both hands, and put all of the steps together.

Remember to extend your left arm UP towards the hoop!

Step 13: Left-Hand – Where to Aim the Ball

To make your lay-up the most consistently, you are going to want to aim for the backboard. When you push the ball out of your hands you want the ball to hit the square, and bounce into the hoop.

Aim for the top left corner of that white square! Just like in the picture.

Step 14: Left-Hand – Practice, Practice, Practice!

Like everything in life, practice makes perfect. Now you can shoot a left-handed lay-up!