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How to administer insulin to a cat

To give insulin as an injection properly for diabetes treatment of your cat, you have to choose insulin injection sites for cats perfectly. Your pet suffering from diabetes may need instant attention. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition in which deficiency of the hormone insulin impairs the body’s ability to metabolize sugar. It is one of the most common endocrine (hormonal) diseases of cats. Diabetes symptoms of canine diabetes are increased thirst, increased frequency of urination, weight loss despite a good appetite. To know more about insulin injection sites for cats, read Travel Guide For Diabetics.

Cats require one or two daily injections of insulin to control blood glucose for diabetes cure. These injections are given under the skin using a small needle. Most of the cats become readily accustomed to the treatments. In most diabetic cats, diabetes management presses for insulin therapy as the most effective diabetes care. Insulin is given by an injection under the skin of the scruff. However, Insulin injection sites for cats require the exact site of administration be changed on a daily basis to reduce any scarring or reaction at the injection site which may limit insulin absorption. But the scruff of the neck has a poor blood supply and is prone to forming granulomas. Because of these characteristics, insulin is absorbed very irregularly. The lateral thorax (chest) and abdomen (stomach) are much better sites for insulin injection. if you want to know more you better join a diabetes association to have more diabetes education regarding injection sites for insulin.

While diabetes can be controlled in some cats through a change of diet and weight loss, unfortionatly most diabetic felines cannot get by with lifestyle changes alone. This is where insulin comes in.

Being the most effective treatment in cats, injecting insulin compensates for the decreased effectiveness of the insulin in the cat’s body. This would mean twice-daily insulin injections for your cat.

The cost of insulin treatment for cats is $25 to $75 per month.

In addition to insulin treatment, there are regular diagnostic costs associated with feline diabetes. These costs include glucose monitoring and regular health checks.

You can expect to pay $700 to $1,200 per year to adequetly monitor a diabetic cat.

Insulin Injections

  • Insulin

Although human insulin can be used, veterinary insulin is usually more cost-effective. Vetsulin is sold in 10 ml containers for $50 to $60 and 2.7 ml containers for $20 to $30.

Once opened, a bottle of Vetsulin will only last 40 days.

Most diabetic cats will not need more than 10 ml of insulin within a 40 days. Mildly diabetic cats may not even need 2.7 ml of insulin over the same period.

Two U-40 syringes per day are needed to give insulin. Generic syringes can cost as low as $15 per a 100 count box, while Vetsulin brand syringes cost about $50 per a 100 count box.

The smaller 2.7 ml container of Vetsulin is designed to be used in an injection pen. The one-time cost of this pen is around $150.

Many pet owners find it easier to use than traditional diabetes syringes. Needles for this pen will cost $50 per a 100 count box. They will need to be used twice daily.

  • Additional Treatments

Spaying or neutering can help manage diabetes in cats. The costs for these procedures are $50 to $100 for neutering and $100 to $200 for spaying.

The majority of diabetic cats are overweight. Follow your veterinarian’s advice for a weight loss plan.

Prescription diets are typically recommended for diabetic cats. Diet can help maintain weight and glucose levels.

These are specialized diets for diabetic cats which have a highly specific carbohydrate content. “Hill’s m/d” food is a commonly perscribed food for diabetic cats. The price is roughly $25 for a 4-pound bag or $40 for 24 cans.

If you choose a non-prescription diet, choose a low-carbohydrate food. Canned food is typically better than dry food in this regard. Also, make sure to keep your cat a healthy weight.

  • Insulin Dosing and Monitoring

To find the correct insulin dose for cats, they will need a glucose curve test. This can be done at home or in a veterinary hospital.

Your cat will eat their regular meal and recieve their insulin injection. Blood will be drawn every 2 hours for glucose measurement.

Glucose curves performed at home usually give better results as your cat is less stressed. An in-home test can be done with the purchase of a pet glucose meter for roughly $60. A veterinary technician can teach you how to use one.

Most owners don’t want to draw their cat’s blood and opt for an in-clinic test. This test costs $60 to $150 and your cat will need to stay at the hospital for the day.

The glucose curve test will need to be repeated every three weeks until the correct insulin dose is determined. Most cats will initially require two or three glucose curve tests.

The insulin dose will need to be rechecked every 3 to 6 months by various methods. Another glucose curve test can be performed.

Alternatively, a fructosamine blood test can be done. This is a simple one-time blood draw and costs $60 to $100. The results will show the average blood glucose in the past few weeks.

Urine test strips can also be used to keep an eye on your cat’s diabetes. Glucose in the urine indicates that the insulin dose needs to be increased.

Ketones in urine indicate poorly managed diabetes as well. When done as a stand-alone test, a urine test strip at the veterinarian will range from $10 to $70.

The veterinarian can obtain a urine sample, however, providing one from home can offer significant savings. There are also significant savings when bundled with other diagnostics.

Along with regular checks on insulin dosing, a diabetic cat will need frequent health checks. It is recommended to have an exam, blood chemistry, CBC and urinalysis every six months.

This will cost $225 to $330, apart from the cat diabetes costs discussed above. Your veterinarian will likely require these checks at least anually to continue insulin treatment.

How to administer insulin to a cat

Dr. Patty Khuly

Patty Khuly, VMD, MBA is a prolific pet health writer, occasional media personality, and a practicing veterinary clinician (for almost 23 years!).

How to administer insulin to a cat

If you recently learned your cat has diabetes, take heart…

A diabetic cat can have a fairly normal life, particularly if:

  • Your cat regulates glucose well and
  • You’re committed to your kitty’s care

And yes, your cat may be able to live a fairly normal life expectancy!

While there isn’t a complete cure for a diabetic cat, it IS possible for your cat to stop showing diabetic symptoms for a while with the right feeding and care.

Here are 4 diabetic cat tips to help you do your best with feeding, insulin shots and glucose checks.

Tip #1: Consider prescription foods that are formulated just for diabetic cats

Diabetic prescription foods tend to be the best foods for diabetic cats.

These foods are usually higher in protein than regular cat foods.

You can find diabetic cat foods from Royal Canin and Purina (to name a few brands).

Some people shy away from prescription cat foods because they cost more, and we certainly understand that concern.

If your goal is to help your kitty live as long as possible, though, your costs may actually work out to be less.

When you commit to one of these foods:

  • Your cat’s glucose tends to be easier to regulate, so…
  • You don’t have to recheck your cat’s blood glucose as much, so…
  • You’re paying for fewer visits to the vet. Your veterinary expenses are lower, offsetting the prescription food costs.

Tip #2: Make sure your diabetic cat eats before receiving an insulin shot

Our veterinarians are often asked:

“How many times a day should I feed my diabetic cat? What’s a good feeding schedule?”

In most instances, it’s okay to leave food out and let your cat graze.

The important thing is to make sure your cat eats before you give an insulin shot.

You do not want to run the risk of dropping your cat’s glucose level too low.

This means your cat should eat twice a day before receiving insulin injections.

A lot of our cat families feed their cats several spoonfuls of canned food before an insulin shot. Then, they just leave the dry food down.

If your cat does not eat anything, DO NOT give the injection.

(Be sure to contact your veterinarian ASAP if your cat doesn’t eat for a day or so.)

Let’s say your cat has a healthy appetite…

Your cat could easily gobble up all the food in one sitting.

In these instances, go to two equal servings of food a day before the insulin injections.

Veterinarians, like ours, can help you calculate the exact amount to feed your cat, so your cat maintains an optimal weight.

Tip #3: Come up with a game plan for feeding your diabetic cat when you have another cat in your home

Ideally, you don’t want your non-diabetic cat eating your diabetic cat’s food. (Or vice versa!)

There are a range of strategies you can consider, such as:

  • Placing food in strategic places around your home
  • Feeding your cats in separate rooms
  • High-tech solutions like special collars that trigger the lid to open on the right cat’s bowl (yep, that’s actually a thing!)

Because each situation with multiple cats is unique, it’s best to chat with your veterinarian for tips for your cat family.

If you live in the Castle Rock area, our veterinarians are happy to help.

Tip #4: Stick to a consistent insulin shot schedule (twice a day) and follow your veterinarian’s suggested schedule for glucose checks

To help your diabetic cat feel better, the first step is to start on a treatment plan. Your plan may include:

  • Changing your cat’s diet
  • Giving your cat more activity
  • Providing insulin shots, or
  • Some combination of the above

After one to two weeks of home care, you’ll bring your cat to veterinarians, like ours, to check whether your cat’s glucose is regulated.

This means your cat is getting the right amounts of insulin to move glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells for energy.

You don’t want the glucose to be too high or too low.

Typically, diabetic cats will come in 3 to 5 times (every couple of weeks) before their glucose levels are where they need to be.

It varies by cat and how diligent you are with home care.

How to administer insulin to a cat

Once your cat’s glucose is at a regulated level, your cat’s check-ups will start to spread out

For example, they may start to go to 3 months and then to 6 months.

If your cat’s glucose gets out of whack, you’ll go back to a visit every few weeks until it’s back on track.

As we mentioned above, a prescription diabetic cat food can make it easier to regulate your cat’s glucose than a regular cat food, which may reduce your vet visits.

Ultimately, though, it depends on your cat.

Some regulate quickly.

Others take some time.

For more insights on cat diabetes, check out:

If you want to make sure your diabetic cat is getting the right care and you live in the Castle Rock area, call us at 303-688-3757 or:

Cherished Companions Animal Clinic is a veterinary clinic in Castle Rock, Colorado. Specializing in the care of cats and dogs, our goal is to help you and your pet feel more comfortable, keeping your stress to a minimum.

This article is intended to provide general guidance on diabetic cat tips, including feeding schedules, insulin shots and glucose checks. If you have specific questions or concerns, please contact your local veterinarian. (If you live in or around Castle Rock, we welcome your call.)

How to administer insulin to a catMost diabetic cats will require insulin therapy as part of their treatment. Diet is also an important cornerstone of treatment for feline diabetes mellitus, and a few diabetic cats can be managed with diet alone, but the majority will require insulin.

There are a variety of types of insulin available. Some are designed for human use but can be useful in pets, while others have been developed specifically for animal use. The natural insulins produced by cat and dog pancreatic cells have slightly different structures than the natural insulin produced by human pancreatic cells. Insulin types made for human use match the natural human insulin, and may not always be as effective in pets. With any insulin, the goal of treatment is to safely reduce or eliminate the symptoms of diabetes (weight loss with excessive thirst, urination and appetite).

There is no ‘best’ insulin for all cats, but some are preferable to others. Many veterinary internal medicine specialists recommend glargine (Lantus®, made by Sanofi Aventis) as a first-line choice. Lantus® is a recombinant human insulin which is usually very effective in cats. In combination with an appropriate diet (canned cat food with less than 7% carbohydrates), glargine has the best chance of inducing a remission, meaning that the cat will no longer require insulin. Lantus® is typically dosed at 1 or 2 units twice daily (BID). In some cats it can be used once daily. Once daily administration is not as likely to induce remission—and won’t control the blood sugar very tightly—but is an option for families or cats who can’t do twice daily injections. The glargine product information for human use recommends replacing the vial every 28 days, but if kept refrigerated, the insulin is effective for cats for at least three months. Lantus® is relatively expensive, but the benefits to the cat are significant because of its high efficacy and the possibility of inducing remission. Since such a small amount is administered, one vial generally goes a long way.

How to administer insulin to a catOther insulin types that are useful in some cats include:

  • NPH (neutral protamine Hagedorn) isophane insulin (Humulin N® [Eli Lilly] or Novolin N® [Novo Nordisk]). NPH is a human insulin that is useful in cats. It is not as likely to induce a remission as glargine, but is less expensive, so is a reasonable option when finances are limited.
  • PZI (protamine zinc insulin). PZI VET® (manufactured by IDEXX) was a pork/beef insulin marketed for cat use, but it was removed from the market. Various compounding pharmacies continue to manufacture it, but the efficacy can’t be assured when different formulas are used in compounding, so veterinary endocrinologists do not recommend its use. ProZinc®, manufactured by Boehringer Ingelheim, is a recombinant human PZI insulin that is marketed specifically for cats. ProZinc® is generally safe and effective in cats.
  • Vetsulin® (United States)/ Caninsulin® (Australia, Europe and Canada). Vetsulin® and Caninsulin®, manufactured by Intervet/Schering-Plough, are the same product but are marketed under different names. They contain pork insulin, specifically marketed for pet use, and are useful for diabetic cats and dogs. Vetsulin® and Caninsulin® have been difficult for American and Canadian veterinarians to acquire recently, and so many veterinarians are transitioning away from using them. Caninsulin® may still be available in Australia and Europe.
  • Detemir (Levemir®, by Novo Nordisk) is a human recombinant insulin that is similar to glargine in its action. Preliminary research has shown it to be effective in cats, and in some cases it can be used only once daily.

It is important not to change or discontinue your cat’s insulin without specific instructions from your veterinarian. It is also important to use the correct syringe type for the specific insulin brand. Usually human insulins are ‘U-100’ (meaning there are 100 units per milliliter) while veterinary insulins are ‘U-40’ (40 units per milliliter). (ProZinc, although a human insulin, is marketed for pets, and as such is U-40.) There are separate syringes manufactured for U-100 and U-40. If the wrong syringe type is used the cat can be dangerously over- or under-dosed. Generally U-100 syringes have an orange cap and U-40 syringes have a red cap.

alt=”u-40 and u-100 syringes” width=”735″ height=”143″ />Injections may be scary when you first learn to give them, but you and your kitty will quickly get into a routine. The needle and syringe used are very small and the discomfort from the injection is minimal.

Regardless of the insulin type used, the injections will need to be given at the same time every day. Most insulins need to be given twice daily—as close to every 12 hours as possible. Most veterinarians recommend feeding the cat twice daily, immediately before the insulin injections. It is important to feed before insulin, because if the insulin is administered first but the cat refuses to eat, he may become hypoglycemic.

Diabetes in cats can often be transient. After a period of treatment with diet and insulin injections, the cat’s pancreas cells can regain their ability to secrete insulin. This is most likely to happen within the first few months of starting treatment, although it can happen even years after diagnosis. Lantus® is the insulin type most likely to cause remission, but it can be seen with any insulin, so it is important to watch closely for symptoms of hypoglycemia (sleepiness, lethargy, weakness, seizures). If you suspect your cat may be hypoglycemic, check his blood sugar at home if you have a glucometer, or administer oral corn syrup or honey (rub on his gums) and take him to your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Remember that every cat is an individual. If a cat isn’t doing well on a particular brand of insulin, an alternative type may be necessary. Your veterinarian will also want to make sure there isn’t a concurrent illness that may be causing insulin resistance, such as dental disease or urinary tract infection.

Healthy cats are able to regulate their blood glucose levels with the help of insulin that’s produced in the body.

Cats diagnosed with diabetes have a harder time maintaining those levels throughout the day, due to an ineffective response to insulin or an insulin deficiency. That’s where PROZINC ® (protamine zinc recombinant human insulin) comes in.

With 2 daily doses, you can provide your diabetic cat the help they need to regulate their blood glucose and relieve clinical signs. 1 With PROZINC proven safety profile, it’s the at-home feline insulin treatment you can feel confident about.

How to administer insulin to a cat

As with any prescription medication, PROZINC should only be given in the dosage and frequency prescribed by your veterinarian. Talk to your vet before making any adjustments to your cat’s treatment.

If your cat has been diagnosed with diabetes, the idea of administering daily insulin injections may seem overwhelming.

With PROZINC, managing feline diabetes is safe and simple.
Here’s how it works:

PROZINC injections should be given before or just after a meal.

Give injections at the same time every day.

Keep a consistent feeding schedule to help ensure proper treatment.

How to administer insulin to a cat

How to administer insulin to a cat

How to administer insulin to a cat

How to administer insulin to a cat

Important User Safety Information: For use in dogs and cats only. Keep out of the reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes. Accidental injection may cause hypoglycemia. In case of accidental injection, seek medical attention immediately. Exposure to product may induce a local or systemic allergic reaction in sensitized individuals.

How to administer insulin to a cat

Important User Safety Information: For use in dogs and cats only. Keep out of the reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes. Accidental injection may cause hypoglycemia. In case of accidental injection, seek medical attention immediately. Exposure to product may induce a local or systemic allergic reaction in sensitized individuals.

How to administer insulin to a cat

Human Safety Information

For use in cats and dogs only. Keep out of reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes. Accidental injection may cause hypoglycemia. In case of accidental injection, seek medical attention immediately. Exposure to product may induce a local or systemic allergic reaction in sensitized individuals.

PROZINC Safety & Dosing

PROZINC is the only American Animal Hospital Association-recommended AND FDA-approved first-line treatment for feline diabetes.

In a clinical study of 151 diabetic cats, most cats treated with PROZINC showed improvement within 45 days. 2

76% showed improvement in excessive thirst.

74% showed improvement in excessive urination.

The twice-daily dosing of PROZINC ensures your cat receives an insulin that provides appropriate duration of action. PROZINC also uses specific syringes with calibrations suitable for cats (known as U-40) to deliver precise, accurate doses, reducing the risk of under- or overdosing. 3

Possible Side Effects of PROZINC

PROZINC, like other drugs, may cause side effects. Serious side effects can occur with or without warning. Please contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your cat has a medical problem or side effect from PROZINC therapy.

The most common insulin-related side effect is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur suddenly and may include:

  • Weakness
  • Staggering gait
  • Muscle twitching
  • Coma
  • Depression, lethargy, sluggishness
  • Behavioral changes
  • Seizures, convulsions
  • Death

Feline Safety Information

  • PROZINC is for use in cats only. Keep out of the reach of children.
  • Owners should be advised to observe for signs of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Signs may include weakness, depression, behavioral changes, muscle twitching, and anxiety. In severe cases of hypoglycemia, seizures and coma can occur. Hypoglycemia can be fatal if an affected animal does not receive prompt treatment.
  • PROZINC should not be used during episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).
  • Appropriate veterinary monitoring of blood glucose, adjustment of insulin dose and regimen as needed, and stabilization of diet and activity help minimize the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. The attending veterinarian should evaluate other adverse reactions on a case-by-case basis to determine if an adjustment in therapy is appropriate, or if alternative therapy should be considered.
  • The safety and effectiveness of PROZINC in kittens, or breeding, pregnant, and lactating animals has not been evaluated.

1 Nelson RW, Henley K, Cole C, et al. Field safety and efficacy of protamine zinc recombinant human insulin for treatment of diabetes mellitus in cats. J Vet Intern Med. 2009;23:787-802.

2 PROZINC ® (protamine zinc recombinant human insulin) [Freedom of Information Summary]. St. Joseph, MO: Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc.; 2009.

3 Borin-Crivellenti S, Bonagura JD, Gilor C. Comparison of precision and accuracy of U100 and U40 insulin syringes. 2014 ACVIM Forum Research Abstracts Program. J Vet Intern Med. 2014;28:1029.

How to administer insulin to a cat

Explore videos, downloadable guides and other free treatment resources.

How to administer insulin to a cat

Learn more about managing feline diabetes

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: PROZINC is for use in dogs and cats only. Keep out of the reach of children. Owners should be advised to observe for signs of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Signs may include weakness, depression, behavioral changes, muscle twitching, and anxiety. In severe cases of hypoglycemia, seizures and coma can occur. Hypoglycemia can be fatal if an affected animal does not receive prompt treatment. PROZINC should not be used during episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Appropriate veterinary monitoring of blood glucose, adjustment of insulin dose and regimen as needed, and stabilization of diet and activity help minimize the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. The attending veterinarian should evaluate other adverse reactions on a case-by-case basis to determine if an adjustment in therapy is appropriate, or if alternative therapy should be considered. The safety and effectiveness of PROZINC in puppies, kittens, or breeding, pregnant, and lactating animals has not been evaluated. For more information, see full prescribing information.

How much insulin to give to a diabetic cat? Interesting question. All cats, like humans are different, so I think it is very much a case of trying an average dose for the weight and age of cat and then adjusting as necessary. As usual your veterinary surgeon is best placed to advise.

I came across a recent article on this exact question on a North Jersey News website. The person who asked the question was confused because the dosage recommended by his vet was not working and the cat’s blood sugar levels were going through the roof.

“I have an old male cat. He was diagnosed with diabetes one month ago. For the first three weeks, I was giving him insulin twice a day. The vet said “fill to the first line.” Last Saturday I took him in for a check-up because he was not responding to the insulin, and found that the first line on my syringe was different than the vet’s. I was giving only half doses!”

The owner then learnt that he was using a different type of syringe than the vets and was actually only administering half the recommended dosage. So a good lesson to learn here! Make sure you know the exact dosage to give and make sure that is what you give.

I actually blame the vet in this case. As a professional he should know that there isn’t such thing as a standard syringe, so he should have told the owner the exact dosage in standard units of measurement and not just said fill to the first graduation line, unless of course he was also giving the owner a quantity of syringes.

That’s whats great about how our bodies are designed. A closed loop feedback system that knows exactly how much insulin to give and when to give it.

Unfortunately when this system stops working and we are forced to administer insulin manually we are for the most part guessing and seldom is the dose exactly what is required, This then leads on to problems caused by too much or too little insulin.

So how much insulin to give to a diabetic cat is a great question to ask but a very difficult one to answer.

Here is a link to the article:-

What also caught my eye in the article was a comment by a reader which implied that the vet was actually giving wrong information in terms of telling the owner not to worry when the cat’s blood sugar levels were in the 500s and 600s…..hmmmmmm. How much insulin to give a diabetic cat? I guess I’m right and there is no easy answer!

How to administer insulin to a cat

This world is a temporary place, and everything in this world, one day will come to an end whether it is humans, animals or anything else.

Same is the case with our pets, one day their life will come to an end, and sometimes it’s up to you to decide that it’s the time to put your vet to a painless sleep.

Here you will find all the information regarding how to euthanize a cat without a vet.

Table of Contents

How to euthanize a cat without a vet?

Cats are considered as one of the most loving and inspiring animals around the world. They are a beautiful animal and considered a symbol of love and peace around the globe.

But one day everything will come to an end, and all we can do about this to make it as painless as possible. When your cat is part of your life for so many years, it’s not easy for you, even anyone to say goodbye.

But when you observe that your cat is not enjoying his life anymore or suffering from multiple health issues, or he/she doesn’t have the energy to stand on its own, and can’t protect its self. It is the right time for both you and your dog to say goodbye.

One of the major reasons for such issues is aging, and an overage cat can’t survive on its own. And when you watch a cat crying, it means that he/she is giving you the signal that the time has come.

In such circumstances, instead of taking any emotional decision, it’s better to concern with the veterinarian. He will guide you; what to do, and how to do. The final decision will be yours whether you want to euthanize your cat at home or take it to the veterinarian office.

You can give your cat a farewell at home by calling you a close friend and family. And after that, you can euthanize him/her, or let your veterinarian do it for you.

The veterinarian mostly uses euthanasia to euthanize, and it can cost you some serious amount. If you can afford this, then it’s okay to let the veterinarian put your cat to sleep, but if you can’t provide this, then it is better to use home methods and do it by your own self.

When to euthanize cats?

If you love cats a lot, your mind and heart will not accept the fact that the time for your cat in this world is almost over. But if you want your cat to die in peace, then its up to you that whenever you see your cat that he/she is no longer enjoys his/her life, and suffering from anxiety or pain, or any sort of disease, first take your cat to the veterinarian. He will clearly tell you the time has come or not.

There are some symptoms that you can observe in your cat.

  • If your cat stops doing any activity he/she usually loves to do, and not show any interest in running around, or speaking, or going to his favorite person in the house, then this is the indication that the time is near.
  • The cat starts to breathe slowly, and it became hard for him to breath, and he/she will cough on a regular basis.
  • Your cat will start to lose all its appetite, and in the worst case possible, he/she can face malnutrition problems. And you have to feed him forcefully.
  • The cat can sometimes face a disease like vomiting, diarrhea, or any other related disorder, and because of that, he/she lost most of the water from the body.
  • In the worst case possible, he/she might not have the power to stand on their own and protect itself against insects.

Chemicals that can euthanize a cat without a vet.

  • Aspirin: cats are very sensitive to some chemicals, and aspirin is one of them. The body of cats does not synthesize as fast the human body does, nor they have the digestive ability to dissolve it in their body. Overdosing cats with aspirin is of the painless we to put your loving cat on sleep for a lifetime. 2 to three doses of aspirin will put them to sleep in a peaceful manner, and 4 to 5 doses of aspirin can do it in a quick way.
  • Insulin: although insulin is considered as a lifesaving drug for many diabetic patients, and you can easily bring insulin from the pharmacy. But the high amount of insulin can put your cat to sleep of lifetime by drooping its blood glucose level. You can inject a heavy dose of insulin to your cats, and within 10 minutes it will put your cat to comma, and eventually to a peaceful and painless death.
  • Sleeping pills: sleeping pills are one of the most effective methods to euthanize cats. There are so many sleeping pills available in the market, and the government has allowed people to use these chemical drugs to euthanize pets. These drugs can be injected in pets, or you can orally give them. In both cases, it will only take 5 to 10 mints to put your cat to sleep painlessly.

Final thoughts.

Most of the people do not have the courage to kill their beloved pet by their own hands, they are soft in nature, and the best way for them is to call any veterinarian to do this. Even veterinarians can come at home to do this job, and you can do all the rituals you wanted to do for your cat.

If you can’t afford the veterinarian, though it is quite expensive, then you can do it in your own hands. But make sure you have all the essential tools.

After you finish your job, find a suitable place for your cat, where he/she can sleep in peace, and where no other animals can reach him. Either you can bury him/her in your yard, or you can buy some land elsewhere. Another thing that you can do is burn your pet, and it is better than burying. Because in this way no other animal can eat your pet.

Do Not Try This at Home. Educational Purpose Only. You Must Get in Touch with Your Vet Prior Doing This.

Insulin injections should be given just under the skin. Many cats tolerate the injections well when given about one to two inches from the middle of the back, near the shoulder blade or hip bone. Be sure to alternate the location each time you give an injection to avoid soreness.

Is insulin harmful to cats?

The most common side effect experienced with Vetsulin® (porcine insulin zinc suspension) therapy, or other insulin preparations, is low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia. If not treated, hypoglycemia can be fatal to your cat. By knowing the causes of hypoglycemia, you can help avoid occurrences.

Can insulin be given orally to cats?

Oral hypoglycemic drugs can be a potential treatment option for affected cats, especially when cats or owners do not tolerate administration of injectable insulin. Several classes of oral hypoglycemic drugs have been evaluated in cats but these drugs have not been commonly used for treatment of diabetic cats.

How to give your diabetic cat an insulin injection?

Dr. Mike shows you the easy way to give your cat an insulin injection. We’ll visit Lisa and her diabetic cat to watch how its done. Dr. Mike educates you on the importance of using the proper syringe for your concentration of insulin. Loading…

What causes a cat to have too much insulin?

Most of the time, when a cat has too much insulin in its body, it’s because of a mistake or mishap related to giving injections. The most common mistake is an accidental double-dose. This usually occurs when two different people in the family each give the cat a regular insulin injection, or an incorrect measurement of a dose.

What happens if you miss a pet insulin shot?

If you are not certain, don’t give another injection. Really, a short period (well, 12 hours) of hyperglycemia for a missed shot is safer than a short period of hypoglycemia from being dosed twice. Just wait until the next injection time in 12 hours and start fresh rather than risk an episode of hypoglycemia. Chin up.

Can you give a low carb canned cat insulin?

Pick one you can afford and your cat likes under 7% – the lower the better. Keep in mind you do NOT want to go changing the diet to low carb without home testing first. Lowering carbs significantly lowers the insulin need and shooting 3u while feeding low carb canned could cause your cat to go hypoglycemic or even die.

How do you give insulin to a cat?

Clean the rubber stopper on the bottle by wiping it with rubbing alcohol before inserting the syringe needle. Turn the insulin bottle upside down and draw up the prescribed amount in a new syringe. Find a good location that works for you and your cat. Insulin injections should be given just under the skin.

If you are not certain, don’t give another injection. Really, a short period (well, 12 hours) of hyperglycemia for a missed shot is safer than a short period of hypoglycemia from being dosed twice. Just wait until the next injection time in 12 hours and start fresh rather than risk an episode of hypoglycemia. Chin up.

How often should I give my Pet an insulin injection?

Soon you will be very proficient with insulin syringes and injections. Again, once you get the hang of it start moving the injection site around. Maybe go down one side of your pet one week then back up the next side the following week. Have a question or comment?

What should I do if I miss my insulin injection?

Just wait until the next injection time in 12 hours and start fresh rather than risk an episode of hypoglycemia. Chin up. Soon you will be very proficient with insulin syringes and injections. Again, once you get the hang of it start moving the injection site around.

How to administer insulin to a cat

If your cat is diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, it means that his pancreas is not producing enough insulin to regulate the amount of sugar in his bloodstream. In most cases of feline diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice.   Though giving injections to a cat can be a scary prospect for many cat owners, most owner’s find the injections are easier than they thought. But what about situations where injections are not possible? In these situations your veterinarian may discuss alternatives to insulin injections that we will discuss below. It is important to understand, all diabetic cats are diagnosed and managed under the guidance of a veterinarian no matter the treatment (even diet) and it is important to never diagnose or try to manage diabetes by yourself.

We discussed there may be other treatment options that are worth exploring in a situation where your cat's personality is not conducive to receiving daily or twice daily injections of insulin or where you are physically incapable of giving the insulin injections. One such option is oral hypoglycemic medications like Glipizide and Acarbose are one such option. These medications act to help lower blood glucose levels. However, hypoglycemic medications rarely work in controlling diabetes in cats.  

Strictly Controlled Diet As Possible Alternative

A strictly-controlled diet can be useful in controlling blood glucose levels in cats with diabetes. Feeding your cat special food by itself may or may not be completely effective, and it is most likely to work for cats who do not have severe diabetes.

The most commonly recommended food for a cat with diabetes is a diet containing high levels of protein and low levels of carbohydrates.   If you are feeding your cat commercial food, canned cat foods are preferred (as opposed to kibble or dry food).

A high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet can be combined with one of the oral hypoglycemic medications to further help regulate your cat’s blood glucose levels. It is possible that this may be more effective than using diet or medication alone.

Other Considerations in the Treatment of Diabetic Cats

Another important consideration in treating a cat with diabetes, especially if the disease is caught early, is that remission is possible if the regulation of blood glucose levels can be controlled effectively.   For that reason, aggressive treatment started early is considered to be the best course.

In many cases, insulin injections provide better glycemic control (control of blood sugar levels) than other medications. Insulin injections, particularly combined with a proper diet of high-protein, low-carbohydrate foods, are effective in converting many cats to a state of remission. This means that insulin injections may be necessary only for a short period of time and then your cat may not need them anymore.

In practice, many cats respond better to insulin injections than they do to the oral hypoglycemic agents or feeding your cat a diet of special food. For this reason, even though alternative treatments may be available if the situation warrants them, insulin is likely to remain the treatment of choice.