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How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Begin with the chain on the smallest cog. Relax the cable tension completely using the cable barrel adjuster. Place a hand on the derailleur body to feel for any lateral motion, and select one screw to turn one full turn clockwise and then counter-clockwise. If you felt motion in the derailleur, this is the “L” screw.

Why is my front derailleur not shifting?

Common Front Derailleur Problems. Front derailleurs may cause sluggish or inaccurate shifting because (A) the derailleur body is not positioned properly, (B) the derailleur limit screws are not adjusted correctly, (C) the mechanism is dirty or (D) the cable is damaged or improperly tensioned.

Why is Shimano so popular?

Shimano is one of the most popular bicycle gearing system in the world. The system is most trusted and reliable among st bicycle enthusiasts. The brand provides a variety of system for mountain bikes, hybrid bikes, roadbikes and other bicycles.

How much does it cost to fix front derailleur?

Full Flat Rate Chart Hourly Rate $100.00/HR Price Adjust Front Derailleur $15.00 Install Front Derailleur $18.00 Adjust Front Index Derailleur $15.00 Install Front Index Derailleur $22.50.

How do I know if my front derailleur is bad?

The symptom of a front derailleur cable that isn’t tight enough is chain rub when it’s on the largest chainring and smaller rear cogs. Because these gears are usually used when riders are traveling at a high rate of speed and pedaling with great effort, it can make a lot of noise and become annoying fast.

How do I remove a 105 gear cable?

Stuck in the 11-tooth: How to easily remove a snapped gear cable from a Shimano 105 shifter Expose the shifter. Roll up the brake hood to expose the shifter. Remove the cover plate. There is a small screw on the inside of the lever. Extract the cable end.

Why is cross chaining bad?

The problem with cross-chaining is that you put more stress on the chain which causes wear and tear on cassette teeth, eventually leading to the chain slipping gears. The chain line is one factor. The chain should ideally run in a plane from the front derailleur teeth back to the rear derailleur.

What does B tension do?

B-Tension is an adjustment using that mysterious third screw on the back of your rear derailleur. Its proper adjustment is the final step to clean and quiet shifting. It also provides a degree of chain tension assuming: Chain is properly installed and the right length.

What is Ghost shifting?

Neil is right, most all “auto shifting” or “ghost shifting” is the result of cable-tension problems. If the cable is a bit loose, the derailleur will try to shift “up” to a smaller cog. If too tight, it will try to catch the next larger cog.

What are the best downtube shifters?

The Dura Ace 7700 dt shifters are a good choice. Another good choice is the Suntour Superbe Pro which has a ratcheting power shift in friction mode, just like the Simplex levers.

Do you adjust front or rear derailleur?

In a nutshell, adjust the front derailleur first, then the rear. If the derailers just need minor tweaking (they are basically in adjustment but are “not quite right”) then you adjust the one that is obviously wrong, check the overall adjustment again, then again adjust what needs adjusting.

Can you convert downtube shifters to STI?

Condensed answer: It’s possible to convert a bike with downtube shifters to STI brake-shifters, but the needed parts could make the conversion too expensive.

Do front derailleurs wear out?

The chain, cassette and/or chainrings are the most likely items to wear out and will typically give visible or measureable cues – such as hooked teeth or a lengthened chain. That said, derailleur springs will lose tension overtime, and pivots will get sloppier.

How tight should front derailleur cable be?

You need to pull it pretty tight before clamping it to the derailleur. Probably as tight as you can. Usually I find that’s still not tight enough, so I screw the barrel adjuster down all the way before putting the cable in and then open it up until the tension is correct.

How do you shift downtube shifters?

Shifters on the downtube means taking one hand off the handlebar in order to shift. These Shimano shifters have an “index” option on the right lever which means there are eight detentes or pauses signaled by audible clicks for each gear as the lever is moved back or forth.

Can I mix Shimano groupsets?

CHAINS AND CASSETTES. SRAM’s cassettes and chains are compatible with all of Shimano’s groupsets, and vice versa. Likewise, Shimano and SRAM buyers have the freedom to mix different levels of chains and cassettes so long as they are designed for the same kind of transmission.

Is Shimano better than SRAM?

Shimano and SRAM both make quality products, but their approach and styles are different. Looking at the current component landscape, it can be said that Shimano is generally the more conservative of the two. Over the last decade, SRAM has pursued drivetrain innovation more aggressively.

Which Shimano groupset is best?

Shimano 105 is considered Shimano’s first performance groupset, and for many people it is the best option in combining performance, value and longevity. Ultegra is next and is very similar to Dura-Ace in terms of performance, though Dura-Ace is lighter.

How do you adjust a Shimano Deore front derailleur?

To adjust the height of the front derailleur, locate the positioning clamp that connects the derailleur to the frame of the bike. Turn the clamp bolt clockwise to loosen it and then adjust the height. Tighten the bolt once it’s adjusted.

Are you supposed to change gears while pedaling?

Rule 1. You must be pedaling when you change gears. If you click the shifters without pedaling, the gears won’t change until you do start pedaling, and when you do, you’ll hear some very disconcerting noises. You also don’t want to shift the gears while standing still.

Does cross chaining matter?

Cross Chaining, Period The problem is that this stretches your chain diagonally to its limits, and needlessly so, since you could just shift to your other chainring and find a similar gear ratio. If you cross-chain enough, you risk seriously damaging your drivetrain. “It is a real thing,” says Feldman.

Are front derailleurs interchangeable?

In addition, front derailleurs are made for either 7, 8, 9 or 10-speed chains, but they can often be used interchangeably. If you are using a different chain than your derailleur was made to work with, the degree of adjustment you can expect will be lower than with a matched set.

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Front derailleur adjustment is easy when you know how, so follow our guide to set yours up in minutes

There are few more upsetting occurrences than shifting gears in expectation of an imminent sprint or climb only to have your front derailleur throw the chain, leaving you with legs twirling but a bike that’s going nowhere.

Less dramatic but nearly as trying is the grating and grinding of a front derailleur that’s somewhat out of adjustment.

It’s a simple-looking bit of componentry, but one that’s susceptible to minute changes in position and cable tension, which means front derailleurs can demand regular attention.

Luckily, an unhappy front derailleur doesn’t ordinarily require an excursion to the bike shop – at least not if you follow our tips to get yours working smoothly again.

Want to ensure both ends are working as well as possible? You can find our guide to adjusting a rear derailleur and indexing your gears here.

How to adjust your front derailleur

Time taken: About 20 minutes
Workshop saving: £10

1. Adjust to the right height

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

The front derailleur should run parallel to the chainrings. If it doesn’t, slacken the bolt fastening it to the frame and rotate it into the right position.

When directly above the largest chainring, the outside edge of the derailleur should sit 2-3mm above the teeth of the chainring. If necessary, shuffle it up or down before retightening the bolt.

2. Limit screws

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Shift into the smallest front chainring and biggest rear sprocket. Of the two screws on top of the derailleur, the one closest to the frame ordinarily controls the lower limit.

This prescribes how close to the frame the derailleur can travel. Adjust it so the inner plate sits just clear of the chain. Rotate the crank to ensure the chain isn’t catching.

3. Cable tension

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Disconnect the cable attached to the derailleur at the anchor bolt. Pull the cable as tight as feasible with your fingers and retighten the anchor bolt.

Try to shift up to the larger chainring. If the chain won’t shift or feels sluggish, twist the inline barrel adjuster further up the cable (turn it anti-clockwise) to increase the tension and try again.

4. Shifting

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

The second screw on the top of the derailleur controls how far outwards it can move. It may be necessary to back it off to allow the chain to reach the big ring.

Once engaged on the largest ring, adjust the screw so the derailleur can move no further than 1mm past the chain. This will ensure the chain can’t over-shift and fall off.

5. Fine-tuning

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

With everything now secured in position, try shifting through the gears. Use the barrel adjuster to fine-tune the position of the derailleur. Turning it anti-clockwise will increase the tension, making it shift into the big chainring more readily.

Don’t forget to shift across the rear cassette as well to make sure each individual gear combination works.

6. Derailleur trim

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Riding with the chain in the smallest sprocket and smallest chainring, or biggest chainring and biggest sprocket, will wear out your drivetrain. On Shimano groupsets, it will also cause the chain to rub against the derailleur.

Shimano shifters have a built-in half-click (press the lever halfway) to allow small adjustments on the move, known as trimming.

How to adjust your rear derailleur video

Now you know your barrel adjusters from your limit screws, why not also have a go at adjusting your rear derailleur too? Check out the video below for a walk-through from ace mechanic Stu Bowers.

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Proper adjustment of the front derailleur is important to shift your Shimano bicycle correctly. An improperly adjusted front derailleur can cause the chain to shift poorly, drag on the derailleur cage or even come off the chainring completely. Shimano derailleurs use a standard setup with a position clamp to hold the derailleur to the frame of your bike and two adjacent screws on top of the derailleur to adjust the low and high gear limits. With just a few hand tools and about 15 minutes, you can adjust your Shimano derailleur at home.

Adjust the position of the Shimano derailleur on the bicycle frame. Loosen the derailleur clamp on the frame with the Allen wrench just enough so that you can slide it up and down rotate it on the frame.

Lower the Shimano derailleur so that the derailleur cage is as close to the largest sprocket on the front chainring as possible without touching. Ensure that no part of the derailleur cage touches the sprocket. Adjust the angle of the derailleur cage to align with the sprockets on the front chainring. Tighten the positioning clamp.

Adjust the low gear limit. Shift the derailleurs to the largest sprocket on the rear freewheel or cassette and the smallest sprocket on the front chainring. Turn the low gear limit on the top of the Shimano derailleur with the Phillips head screwdriver to adjust the derailleur cage so that it prevents the chain from coming off the smallest sprocket.

Adjust the high gear limit. Shift the derailleurs to the smallest rear sprocket and the largest front chainring sprocket. Turn the high gear limit on the top of the Shimano derailleur to adjust the derailleur cage so that it just clears the chain on the largest sprocket.

Shift again to the largest sprocket on the rear gears and the smallest sprocket on the front chainring. Place your gear shifter in the lowest gear. Loosen the cable bolt on the front derailleur with the Allen wrench. Pull the shift cable to remove any slack. Tighten the cable bolt.

Adjusting your front derailleur might seem complicated, but with a couple of tips, you can get it set up just right. Every cyclist knows how frustrating it is to be unable to shift gears just as you are coming to an essential point of your ride. The culprit is more often than not a maladjusted front derailleur.

When the front derailleur comes out of alignment, it keeps the chain in the bike from moving between higher and lower gears. There is no need to panic if this occurs and it is actually something that you can fix it by yourself. So, today we share with you how to adjust front derailleur.

Tools That We Need

1. Hex Wrench
2. Screwdriver
3. Penny

How To Adjust Front Derailleur- The Complete Guide

Adjusting the lower limit

To adjust the lower limit, first, you have to shift the smallest chainring in the front and largest sprocket in the rear. Now, you can set the lower limit. At that point when you screw the L-screw in, the front derailleur moves away from the frame and when unscrewing the L-screw, the front derailleur moves toward the frame. The lower limit is set accurately when the inner chain plate is ca. 1 mm away from the chain.

Adjusting the upper limit

To adjust the upper limit, first, you have to shift the largest chainring in the front and the smallest sprocket in the rear. Now, you can use the H-screw to set the distance between the external chainplate and the chain. At that point when you screw the screw in, the front derailleur moves towards the frame and when you screw it out, it moves away from the frame. The upper limit is set accurately when the outer chainplate is ca. 1 mm away from the chain.

Limit screws

Shift into the smallest front chainring and largest back sprocket. Of the two screws over the derailleur, the one nearest the frame usually controls the lower limit.

This directs how close to the frame the derailleur can move. Adjust it so the inner plate sits just clear of the chain. Spin the wrench to check the chain isn’t catching.

The correct cable tension

Now that the limits are set accurately, you can adjust the inner wire tension. First, you have to shift the front derailleur back and forth a few times. If the chain is not cleanly moving from the smallest to the largest chainring, then you have to increase the inner wire tension. To do this task, turn the barrel adjuster counterclockwise.

Shifting

The second screw on the top of the derailleur controls how far outwards it can move. It may be important to back it off to allow the chain to reach the big ring.

When engaged on the largest ring, adjust the screw so the derailleur can move no further than 1mm past the chain. This will make sure the chain can’t over-shift and fall off.

Fine-tuning

With everything now locked in position, try shifting through the gears. Use the barrel adjuster to fine-tune the position of the derailleur. Turning it anti-clockwise will increase the tension, making it shift into the big chainring more easily. Don’t forget to shift across the rear cassette as well to ensure each individual gear combination works.

Derailleur trim

Riding with the chain in the smallest sprocket and smallest chainring, or biggest chainring and biggest sprocket will harm your drivetrain. On Shimano systems, it’ll also make the chain to rub the derailleur. Shimano shifters have a built-in half-click to allow small adjustments on the move, known as trimming.

Final Words

After all the adjustments, the front derailleur should shift easily and precisely. Time to get back out there and shred some trails or clock some kilometers on the road. We hope you found this post helpful. If you have any questions regarding how to adjust front derailleur please let us know in the comment section below. We will be happy to answer them to our best abilities.

Today we’re going to learn how to adjust the front derailleur. Make sure that you’ve already set up your rear derailleur, as you will need to access all of your rear gears for this tutorial.

Front Derailleur Components

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Height Adjustment

The first step is to adjust the derailleur’s height and angle using the positioning clamp that attaches the derailleur to your bike’s frame. This can be a bit tricky, since tightening the clamp’s bolt will set both height and angle at the same time. To make things easier, tighten the clamp so that it is secure, but loose enough to move it around with your hand.

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

For correct height adjustment, position the bottom of the derailleur cage as close to the largest sprocket teeth as possible, so that it still clears. Manufacturers recommend a 2mm spacing, but this is only meant as a general guide and not a rule. The lower the cage is, the better it will shift. While you’re in this position, take a quick look at the curvature of the large chainring and the outer derailleur cage, to make sure no part of the cage is rubbing on the chainring.

Angle Adjustment

The derailleur angle is set by looking down from above. This can be tricky and requires some patience, as the shape of the derailleur cage is often not straight. You’ll want to imagine a centerline in the middle of the cage, which should line up with the center line of your frame. Once the angle is correct, you can completely tighten the positioning clamp.

Limit Screws

There are two gear limit screws. On older derailleurs the low-gear limit is closest to the frame, but some newer models have reversed the screw’s positioning.

Low Gear Limit

To adjust the low-gear limit, first make sure your chain is shifted to the largest sprocket in the rear, and the smallest sprocket in the front. The low-gear limit stop stops the derailleur from shifting past the smallest chainwheel and throwing the chain onto the bottom bracket shell. If it is too loose, the chain will fall off when you downshift to the small chainring. If it is too tight, it might not shift down at all. Ideally, you want to set up the inner plate so that it barely clears the chain in the lowest gear. However, triple chainrings like this one sometimes require a tiny bit of extra spacing.

High Gear Limit

To adjust the high-gear limit, shift the chain into your highest gear, that is, smallest sprocket in the rear, and the largest sprocket in the front. The high-gear limit prevents the chain from shifting past the largest chainwheel and throwing the chain out into your pedals. Ideally you want the cage to stop just after it clears the chain on the large chainring.

Shifting Adjustments

Now that both limit screws are set up, shift back to the largest sprocket in the rear, and the smallest in the front. Make sure your front shifter is in the lowest gear position, and pull the shift cable to eliminate any extra slack, before tightening the cable bolt.

Shift the front derailleur to the middle gear, and run through the entire range of rear sprockets to make sure the chain does not rub on either side of the front derailleur cage. If it does rub, you can adjust the trim by tweaking the barrel adjuster on your front shift lever. If you have an older friction shifter, often you will have to manually adjust the trim while riding.

This tutorial was based on the most common type of drivetrain, and assumes that you are using the components your derailleur was designed for. If you have a customized set of chainrings and/or derailleurs, you may need to try some different techniques, or even take your bike into a shop for further adjustment.

Alex Ramon

A bicycle geek since early childhood, spent his twenties as a mechanic in bike shops. His passions include flatland BMX, unicycles, cycle touring, mountain biking and road riding.

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Poorly indexed gears can be one of the most frustrating things on a bike, but our step-by-step guide can show you how to adjust your bike gears to get them running smoothly.

Like your brakes, gears rely on correct adjustment and the smooth operation of cables to work well.

Modern gears are indexed — that is to say, as you click the gear lever into a gear position on the handlebars, the front or rear derailleur puts the chain onto the corresponding cog or ring. It should do this effortlessly and without any fuss.

It should not go into a different gear position nor should it slip into another gear as you pedal along.

When the gears are working well you cannot shift gear past either the largest or the smallest cog or chainring.

Incorrect derailleur adjustment may not sound as dangerous as ineffective brakes, but having a derailleur slip into your spokes, having a chain come off the front chainring, or having your gears slip can all result in a trip to casualty!

Adjusting the rear derailleur

Step 1

Put the gear lever into top gear, turn the pedals and allow the chain to go onto the smallest cog on the cassette. If there is a cable adjuster on the gear lever body, or the derailleur body, screw it almost all the way in (clockwise).

Step 2

Undo the cable-securing bolt on the derailleur and move the cable out of the way.

Step 3

Turn the pedals while using your other hand to manually push the rear derailleur in towards the rear wheel.

If the derailleur’s inner adjusting screw is correctly adjusted, the chain will only travel onto the largest cog and go no further.

Step 4

If it goes beyond that cog and falls into the spokes, turn the derailleur adjusting screw in (clockwise) and repeat step three. If the chain does not sit comfortably on the biggest cog, unscrew the adjusting screw a little and try again.

Step 5

Once you’re happy with that, allow the derailleur’s spring to push the derailleur outwards onto the smallest cog.

Again if the chain comes off, or does not sit properly on the smallest cog, turn the other adjusting screw to move the derailleur’s position.

Step 6

When the derailleur’s travel goes comfortably between the high and low cogs on the cassette, refit the gear cable and do up the securing bolt.

Step 7

Using the gear lever, go through all the gears several times. If the derailleur is slow to go into the lower gears, unscrew the cable adjuster on the derailleur body.

If it is slow to go into the higher gears, screw in the cable adjuster. Re-check that all the securing bolts are tight and go for a gentle test ride.

Adjusting the front derailleur

Step 1

Put the gear lever into the lowest gear, and if there is a cable adjuster on the gear lever body, screw it almost all the way in. Undo the cable-securing bolt on the operating lever of the derailleur and move the cable out of the way.

Step 2

Check that the front derailleur is parallel to the chainring, and there is a gap of around 2mm between the top of the largest chain wheel and the bottom of the outer plate of the front derailleur.

If not, loosen the fixing clamp and realign the derailleur.

Step 3

With the chain on the biggest cog at the rear, adjust the ‘inner’ adjusting screw so that when the chain is on the smallest chainring it sits in the middle of the derailleur side plates.

Step 4

Now with the chain on the smallest cog on the rear cassette, pedal the bike with one hand and pull the front derailleur so that the chain goes onto the largest chainring at the front, and is again in the middle of the derailleur plates.

You achieve this by screwing or unscrewing the ‘outer’ adjusting screw on the derailleur body.

Step 5

Let the derailleur return to its position over the smallest chain ring. Refit the cable, and tighten the securing bolt.

Step 6

With the bike held off the ground, and the chain now on the largest cog at the back, test the front derailleur by moving the chain between the smallest and next chainring using the gear lever.

Do this with the crank arm at 12 o’clock, 3 o’clock, 6 o’clock and 9 o’clock, so that any slight bend in the chainring becomes apparent. If the chain falls off the smaller chainring, adjust the ‘inner’ derailleur adjusting screw so that the derailleur does not go so far in.

When you’ve done this successfully, and with the gear lever back in ‘1’ or ‘low’ and the chain on the small chainring, loosen the cable securing bolt and take up the slack on the cable.

Step 7

Put the chain onto the smallest cog on the rear cassette. If you have a three-ring crankset, repeat the procedure above, this time going from the middle chainring to the biggest chainring.

If the chain falls off the front of the chainring, adjust the ‘outer’ derailleur adjusting screw, so the derailleur does not move quite so far out.

Step 8

If you find that the derailleur is slow changing up from small to big chainring, unscrew the cable adjuster on the gear lever body a little.

Just be sure that is does not then become slow changing down. Recheck that all the securing bolts are tight and go for a gentle test ride.

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

Who does not know it: In front of you there is a steep counter climb, you turn the handle back two or three gears looking forward to the right gear shift ratio, but apart from an unhealthy chattering, not much happens. The right gear just doesn’t want to jump in and you yourself desperate on the slope. If your Shimano hub gear currently shows such symptoms and is a bit stubborn, you can read here how to set the gear correctly again.

Basic Maintenance

A Shimano hub gear is usually very low-maintenance and rarely needs to be adjusted. If you stick to the regular oil changes (approx. Every 5000 km or every two years), you prevent premature wear and thus ensure long-lasting good performance.

However, it is normal for the gearshift to change from time to time, as the shifting cable takes a little longer to use. But you can breathe a sigh of relief: the setting is relatively simple and can also be carried out by everyone – usually you do not need any tools. You can save yourself the trip to the specialist. The gearshift is set at non-critical points, which is why there is very little that can be broken – at least as long as you do not try to open the hub body.

When should I adjust my Shimano Derailleur?

It is usually quite noticeable that a hub gear must be reset. Most of the time, the desired gear cannot be selected, or only with a lot of force, or you have to turn the rotary handle further than the printed display would indicate. Unwanted switching operations are also common problems.

However, it does not always have to be the setting. Especially in the case of stiffness, it can sometimes be due to an old, dirty or damaged cable cover. As a result, the shift cable can no longer slide properly inside, which requires a lot of force with every shift. So it’s worth looking here. If you don’t find any defects, just read through in the next section how to set your derailleur.

Step by Step: Adjust Shimano Derailleur

The setting of a Shimano is quite similar for all models, but there are differences in the details. We have written down the suitable handles for each hub step by step below.

1. Shift into the right gear

In order to correctly set a Shimano derailleur, you must always select the appropriate reference gear on the rotary control handle. This varies depending on the model:

Type of Shimano Derailleur Gear
Shimano Alfine 11 6th Gear
Shimano Alfine 8 4th Gear
Shimano Nexus 8 4th Gear
Shimano Alfine 7 4th Gear
Shimano Alfine 3 2nd Gear

2. Check the yellow marking

With a Shimano Nexus 3-speed hub you can find the marking on the silver hub gear box directly at the dropout. Here the yellow stripe should lie in the middle between the two white boundary lines.

With Nexus 7- / 8-speed and Alfine models, however, the markings are attached directly to the hub body. To see the yellow stripe, all you have to do is move the chain guard slightly. Now the small stripe should line up with the second yellow mark. Practical: The markings are attached at the top and bottom, so that they can be seen both on a bicycle upside down and in the work stand.

The following applies to all models: If the markings are not as described above, readjustment is necessary. This works by means of the tension of the shift cable

3. Adjust the tension of the shift cable

Depending on the model, the tension of the shift cable is set on the shift lever or on the hub. The latter is the case with the Nexus 3-speed hub, which is why you have to loosen the nut on the hub gear box either by hand or with a 10 mm spanner. Now you can turn the adjusting screw until the yellow marking is in the middle between the white boundary strips. Then you tighten the nut again so that the set screw cannot fall off. For the correct tightening torque, please refer to the information provided by the manufacturer.

With the other Shimano models, you can set the tension directly without tools using the adjusting screw on the shift handle. Again, turn left or right until the yellow marking fits.

After setting the tension, you should shift once to first gear and once beyond the reference gear for all hub gears. The markings should then still be a perfect fit in the reference aisle.

If adjustment using the set screws is not possible because you cannot turn them far enough, the cable on the hub must be loosened and tightened with a little more tension. This is best done with narrow pliers. It is important that the adjusting screws in front are turned to a middle position in order to have enough leeway afterwards. The fine adjustment is done again with the adjusting screws.

4. Test the setting

When the yellow markings are back in place, you should test the shifting. It’s very easy: Shift through all gears slowly without turning the rotary handle over the respective display. If all the gears can be engaged precisely, crisply and with little effort, you seem to have done everything right. The next climb will be easy.

Comparison Table Best MTB Derailleur Name Supports Single Front Rating Shimano XTR Di2 RD-M9050 Yes 4.6 SRAM XX1 Eagle Yes 5.0 Shimano M640 Zee Yes 4.4 Shimano Deore XT RD-M786 SGS Yes 4.9.

How do you adjust Shimano Revoshift?

Turn the top adjustment screw clockwise. If there is interference between the chain and the front derailleur outer plate at the largest chainring. Tighten the cable. If this does not improve the condition, turn the top adjustment screw counterclockwise.

When should a derailleur hanger be replaced?

If your derailleur takes a hit during your ride, the derailleur hanger is there to absorb the impact. If the hanger gets damaged or bent, you’ll need to replace it.

Why are my bike gears so hard to change?

Cable tension and limit setting The most obvious and common causes for poor shifting are down to poor adjustment and the most common thing to go out of adjustment is cable tension. In the simplest of terms, sluggish upshifts can be caused by too little cable tension; while slow downshifts could be too much tension.

Why does my bike chain slip when I pedal hard single speed?

Anyway, when you’re pedaling hard, there is tension in the top section of the chain, between the ring teeth and the cog. Under this tension, they stay engaged even if the returning-to-ring section of the chain is sagging.

Why does my chain keep jumping?

When your bike chain skips between gears while you’re riding, or shifts twice instead of once when you try to change gears, the most common culprit is a loose cable. Your bike cables naturally stretch over time.

What causes a rear derailleur hanger to bend?

A common cause of a misaligned hanger is from the bike falling over to the right side. This pushes the derailleur body inward, bending the hanger. This is because there is very little stress from riding the bike or shifting gears. As a rule of thumb, if a hanger survives a repair by bending, it will survive use.

How do you adjust a Shimano XT derailleur?

How to Adjust a Shimano XT Rear Derailleur on a Bicycle Shift the derailleur down to the smallest cog on the chainring. Locate the high limit screw. Loosen the cable anchor by unscrewing it slightly. Tighten the barrel adjuster by turning it clockwise.

How do I know if my front derailleur is bad?

The symptom of a front derailleur cable that isn’t tight enough is chain rub when it’s on the largest chainring and smaller rear cogs. Because these gears are usually used when riders are traveling at a high rate of speed and pedaling with great effort, it can make a lot of noise and become annoying fast.

Are front derailleurs interchangeable?

In addition, front derailleurs are made for either 7, 8, 9 or 10-speed chains, but they can often be used interchangeably. If you are using a different chain than your derailleur was made to work with, the degree of adjustment you can expect will be lower than with a matched set.

How tight should front derailleur cable be?

You need to pull it pretty tight before clamping it to the derailleur. Probably as tight as you can. Usually I find that’s still not tight enough, so I screw the barrel adjuster down all the way before putting the cable in and then open it up until the tension is correct.

Which derailleur do you adjust first?

In a nutshell, adjust the front derailleur first, then the rear. If the derailers just need minor tweaking (they are basically in adjustment but are “not quite right”) then you adjust the one that is obviously wrong, check the overall adjustment again, then again adjust what needs adjusting.

How do I know if my bike is 10 or 11 speed?

Multiply the front gear number by the rear gear number to get the number of speeds. For example, if you have two front gears and five back gears, you have a 10-speed bike.

How do you increase chain tension?

To change the tension loosen one of the axle-nuts and move the wheel forward or backward slightly and snug it up again. Then, loosen the opposite axle-nut, adjust and tighten, making sure the wheel remains centered in the frame. Re-check tension. A chain tensioner can make the process easier.

What is B screw on rear derailleur?

Simply put, the B-Tension screw is there to control the gap between guide pulley (the upper pulley on the derailleur) and the bottom of the cogs. It’s also recommended that if you have a front derailleur, it should be shifted into the smallest chainring.

How do you fix a chain that skips?

To fix a skip in the rear derailleur, shift your chain into the smallest ring on your rear cassette (the hardest gear) and the middle or larger ring on your front derailleur. Press your shifter once. If the chain doesn’t move up a gear, you need to add tension.

Are Shimano Tourney gears good?

The Shimano Tourney groupsets are entry-level and are most commonly found on budget City, Hybrid and MTB bicycles. With front, rear derailleurs, cranksets, shifters and hubs the Tourney series of groupsets are ideal for bicycles meant for commuting, flat trails and occasional long-distance rides.

Is SRAM better than Shimano?

Shimano and SRAM both make quality products, but their approach and styles are different. Looking at the current component landscape, it can be said that Shimano is generally the more conservative of the two. Over the last decade, SRAM has pursued drivetrain innovation more aggressively.

How do I choose a derailleur?

It’s generally best to go for as short a derailleur cage as you can get away with, as long as you can avoid the chain contorting on the extremes of the cassette, such as using the largest on both sprocket and chainring. Smaller cages tend to have snappier gear changes, they’re lighter, and also less exposed to damage.

How to adjust a shimano front derailleur

On a bicycle, the front derailleur moves your chain between higher and lower gears. A poorly adjusted derailleur can cause your chain to rub and gears to shift and drop unexpectedly. You can avoid these problems, especially on a steep climb or during other conditions in which a perfectly tuned derailleur is desirable, by setting limit screws, adjusting your front derailleur and adjusting cable tension.

Derailleur Adjustment

Set the limit screws with a Phillips head screwdriver so that the derailleur does not shift or move the chain off the chain rings.

Shift so that your chain is in the lowest gear, which is the smallest chain ring in the front and largest in the back.

Set the L-limit screw (the one closest to your frame) with a Phillips head screwdriver so the derailleur cage closest to your bike is about 2 mm away from the smallest chain ring.

Shift to the highest gear, with the largest chain ring in the front and smallest in the back.

Set the H-limit screw so that the derailleur cage plate farthest from your frame is about 2 mm away from the largest chain ring.

Pull with your finger or a pair of pliers the derailleur’s cable away from the bike to eliminate slack, then tighten the cable bolt (located on the cable pinch bolt above the front derailleur) with the 5 mm Allen key.

Shift between your two or three (depending on derailleur) chain rings. If your chain does not easily shift or if it rubs, fine-tune the derailleur by increasing the tension with a shifter cable adjustment.

Shifter Cable Adjustment

Shift to largest sprocket in both the front and the back.

Turn the cable adjustment bolt (located on the cable leading to the front derailleur) counter clockwise about three turns.

Shift the bike through all gears, high and low. If the chain does not transfer smoothly, continue to turn the cable adjustment bolt until it does.