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How to add two numbers in visual basic

Write a program in vb.net that will ask the user to enter two numbers and compute the sum of that numbers.

Create a GUI (graphical user interface) and a console application for this program.

Solution:

We are going to create two forms for this program; gui version and console application.

For gui we will be using windows form application and console is creating a project in a command line application.

We will be using Microsoft Visual Studio 2010.

Kindly follow the step by step tutorial.

For Windows Form Application

  1. Open your VS2010
  2. Click File then New Project
  3. Select the Visual Basic then Windows Form Application. Click OK.
  4. We will add controls to our form.
    1. 2 labels
    2. 2 textboxes
    3. 1 button

    Code Explanation:

    The program will validate first the input of the user, it will check if the field is not empty or the user has entered a numeric value. The program will not compute the sum unless the user has entered a numeric value on the two textboxes. The sum of two numbers will be displayed in a message box.

    How to add two numbers in visual basic

    1. Save and Run the project.

    For Console Application

    1. Open you VS2010
    2. Click File then New Project
    3. Select Visual Basic then Console Application, Click OK.
    4. The default code that you can see is
    1. Paste the code below between Sub Main() and End Sub

    Code Explanation:

    First is we are going to declare 3 variables; firstnum, secondnum and sum all are integer type. Next is we’re going to ask the user to enter the first variable, the program will read that user input, same goes for the second number. Lastly is the program will add the two numbers and display the result.

    How to write a Visual Basic(VB) program for Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division of two numbers with examples.

    Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and division are the most basic mathematical operation and it can be a best practice to learn any programming language.

    Let’s see how can we perform simple mathematical operations in visual basic. Check more Visual Basic programs for beginners.

    Visual basic program to Add two numbers

    To add two numbers in visual basic is really simple just use (+) operator. the below code will print the sum of two numbers: 30.

    Visual basic program to Subtract two numbers

    To subtract two numbers is visual basic. we can use (-) operator. the below code will print Subtraction of two numbers: 10

    Visual basic program to Multiply two numbers

    Use (*) operator to multiply two numbers in visual basic. The output of the below code will be Multiplication of two numbers: 200.

    Visual basic program to Divide two numbers

    Use (/) operator to divide two numbers in visual basic. The output of the below code will be Division of two numbers: 2.

    Write a visual basic program to perform basic mathematical operations.

    Below is the code to perform basic mathematical operations like Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and division in visual basic. In this example, we have two numbers a = 10 and b =5 and we are going to perform all mathematical operations on the same numbers.

    How to create a calculator in visual basic.

    Below is the code to create a calculator in visual basic. This is the GUI program where the user will enter the number in the input text field and the output generates accordingly. Create a calculator application in visual basic.

    Calculator application in visual basic using forms

    Write a visual basic program to create a calculator application using forms. Create a simple application in visual basic.

    How to write a Visual Basic(VB) program for Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division of two numbers with examples.

    Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and division are the most basic mathematical operation and it can be a best practice to learn any programming language.

    Let’s see how can we perform simple mathematical operations in visual basic. Check more Visual Basic programs for beginners.

    Visual basic program to Add two numbers

    To add two numbers in visual basic is really simple just use (+) operator. the below code will print the sum of two numbers: 30.

    Visual basic program to Subtract two numbers

    To subtract two numbers is visual basic. we can use (-) operator. the below code will print Subtraction of two numbers: 10

    Visual basic program to Multiply two numbers

    Use (*) operator to multiply two numbers in visual basic. The output of the below code will be Multiplication of two numbers: 200.

    Visual basic program to Divide two numbers

    Use (/) operator to divide two numbers in visual basic. The output of the below code will be Division of two numbers: 2.

    Write a visual basic program to perform basic mathematical operations.

    Below is the code to perform basic mathematical operations like Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and division in visual basic. In this example, we have two numbers a = 10 and b =5 and we are going to perform all mathematical operations on the same numbers.

    How to create a calculator in visual basic.

    Below is the code to create a calculator in visual basic. This is the GUI program where the user will enter the number in the input text field and the output generates accordingly. Create a calculator application in visual basic.

    Calculator application in visual basic using forms

    Write a visual basic program to create a calculator application using forms. Create a simple application in visual basic.

    How to add, subtract, multiply and divide 2 different numbers from 2 different form. Pls help me. The code i think is way too simple example: (Result.text = result) (Text1.text = number from form2)(Text2,text = Number from form3). the code i think is like this and this one is not working:

    Public Sub Command1_Clicked()
    Result.text = Val(Text1.Text) + Val(Text2.text)
    End Sub

    Pls help me. i cant sleep because of this problem.

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    Recommended Answers

    How to add, subtract, multiply and divide 2 different numbers from 2 different form. Pls help me. The code i think is way too simple example: (Result.text = result) (Text1.text = number from form2)(Text2,text = Number from form3). the code i think is like this and this one is not …

    There is no error in the code, For future reference please read the Daniweb Posting Rules. Particularly the part about hijacking old threds.

    All 6 Replies

    How to add, subtract, multiply and divide 2 different numbers from 2 different form. Pls help me. The code i think is way too simple example: (Result.text = result) (Text1.text = number from form2)(Text2,text = Number from form3). the code i think is like this and this one is not working:

    Public Sub Command1_Clicked()
    Result.text = Val(Text1.Text) + Val(Text2.text)
    End Sub

    Pls help me. i cant sleep because of this problem.

    Thank You Very Much.

    Can I be able to write a simple program to accept two numbers in one textbox including an operator +,-,/,*, using vb 2010

    Can I be able to write a simple program to accept two numbers in one textbox including an operator +,-,/,*, using vb 2010

    yes , it can be written and in fact its very easy to achieve , you just need to put 2 textboxes and 1 command button and make use of arithmetic operators.

    you can also accept these numbers using inputbox.

    for further assistance , i highly recommend you to post the question in appropriate thread , we have seperate forum for vb.net.

    pls anyone tell me what is the error in this code for (n=a1-a3)

    Dim a1, a2, a3, a4, x, n As Integer
    Private Sub Command1_Click()
    a1 = Val(Text1.Text)
    a2 = Val(Text2.Text)
    a3 = Val(Text3.Text)
    a4 = Val(Text4.Text)
    x = a3 + a2 – a4
    n = a1 – a3
    Text5.Text = x
    Text6.Text = n
    End Sub

    Adds two numbers or returns the positive value of a numeric expression. Can also be used to concatenate two string expressions.

    Syntax

    Parts

    Term Definition
    expression1 Required. Any numeric or string expression.
    expression2 Required unless the + operator is calculating a negative value. Any numeric or string expression.

    Result

    If expression1 and expression2 are both numeric, the result is their arithmetic sum.

    If expression2 is absent, the + operator is the unary identity operator for the unchanged value of an expression. In this sense, the operation consists of retaining the sign of expression1 , so the result is negative if expression1 is negative.

    If expression1 and expression2 are both strings, the result is the concatenation of their values.

    If expression1 and expression2 are of mixed types, the action taken depends on their types, their contents, and the setting of the Option Strict Statement. For more information, see the tables in "Remarks."

    Supported Types

    All numeric types, including the unsigned and floating-point types and Decimal , and String .

    Remarks

    In general, + performs arithmetic addition when possible, and concatenates only when both expressions are strings.

    If neither expression is an Object , Visual Basic takes the following actions.

    If Option Strict is Off , then implicitly convert the String to Double and add.

    If one expression is an Object expression, Visual Basic takes the following actions.

    If Option Strict is Off , then implicitly convert the String to Double and add.

    If Option Strict is Off , then implicitly convert the string Object to Double and add.

    If both expressions are Object expressions, Visual Basic takes the following actions ( Option Strict Off only).

    If either Object expression evaluates to Nothing or DBNull, the + operator treats it as a String with a value of "".

    When you use the + operator, you might not be able to determine whether addition or string concatenation will occur. Use the & operator for concatenation to eliminate ambiguity and to provide self-documenting code.

    Overloading

    The + operator can be overloaded, which means that a class or structure can redefine its behavior when an operand has the type of that class or structure. If your code uses this operator on such a class or structure, be sure you understand its redefined behavior. For more information, see Operator Procedures.

    Example

    The following example uses the + operator to add numbers. If the operands are both numeric, Visual Basic computes the arithmetic result. The arithmetic result represents the sum of the two operands.

    You can also use the + operator to concatenate strings. If the operands are both strings, Visual Basic concatenates them. The concatenation result represents a single string consisting of the contents of the two operands one after the other.

    If the operands are of mixed types, the result depends on the setting of the Option Strict Statement. The following example illustrates the result when Option Strict is On .

    The following example illustrates the result when Option Strict is Off .

    To eliminate ambiguity, you should use the & operator instead of + for concatenation.

    In the seventh part of this tutorial, you’ll add multiplication and division problems, but first think about how to make that change. Consider the initial step, which involves storing values.

    This topic is part of a tutorial series about basic coding concepts. For an overview of the tutorial, see Tutorial 2: Create a timed math quiz.

    To add multiplication and division problems

    Add four more integer variables to the form.

    Use the programming language control at the top right of this page to view either the C# code snippet or the Visual Basic code snippet.

    How to add two numbers in visual basic

    As you did before, modify the StartTheQuiz() method to fill in random numbers for the multiplication and division problems.

    Modify the CheckTheAnswer() method so that it also checks the multiplication and division problems.

    You can’t easily enter the multiplication sign (×) and the division sign (÷) using the keyboard, so C# and Visual Basic accept an asterisk (*) for multiplication and a slash mark (/) for division.

    Change the last part of the timer’s Tick event handler so that it fills in the correct answer when time runs out.

    Save and run your program.

    Quiz takers must answer four problems to complete the quiz, as the following illustration shows.

    How to add two numbers in visual basic
    Math quiz with four problems

    To continue or review

    To go to the next tutorial step, see Step 8: Customize the quiz.

    To return to the previous tutorial step, see Step 6: Add a subtraction problem.

    result
    Required. Any numeric variable or property.

    number1
    Required. Any numeric expression.

    number2
    Required. Any numeric expression.

    Supported types

    All numeric types. This includes the unsigned and floating-point types and Decimal .

    Result

    The result is the remainder after number1 is divided by number2 . For example, the expression 14 Mod 4 evaluates to 2.

    There is a difference between remainder and modulus in mathematics, with different results for negative numbers. The Mod operator in Visual Basic, the .NET Framework op_Modulus operator, and the underlying rem IL instruction all perform a remainder operation.

    The result of a Mod operation retains the sign of the dividend, number1 , and so it may be positive or negative. The result is always in the range (- number2 , number2 ), exclusive. For example:

    Remarks

    If either number1 or number2 is a floating-point value, the floating-point remainder of the division is returned. The data type of the result is the smallest data type that can hold all possible values that result from division with the data types of number1 and number2 .

    If number1 or number2 evaluates to Nothing, it is treated as zero.

    Related operators include the following:

    The Operator (Visual Basic) returns the integer quotient of a division. For example, the expression 14 4 evaluates to 3.

    The / Operator (Visual Basic) returns the full quotient, including the remainder, as a floating-point number. For example, the expression 14 / 4 evaluates to 3.5.

    Attempted division by zero

    If number2 evaluates to zero, the behavior of the Mod operator depends on the data type of the operands:

    • An integral division throws a DivideByZeroException exception if number2 cannot be determined in compile-time and generates a compile-time error BC30542 Division by zero occurred while evaluating this expression if number2 is evaluated to zero at compile-time.
    • A floating-point division returns Double.NaN.

    Equivalent formula

    The expression a Mod b is equivalent to either of the following formulas:

    Floating-point imprecision

    When you work with floating-point numbers, remember that they do not always have a precise decimal representation in memory. This can lead to unexpected results from certain operations, such as value comparison and the Mod operator. For more information, see Troubleshooting Data Types.

    Overloading

    The Mod operator can be overloaded, which means that a class or structure can redefine its behavior. If your code applies Mod to an instance of a class or structure that includes such an overload, be sure you understand its redefined behavior. For more information, see Operator Procedures.

    Example 1

    The following example uses the Mod operator to divide two numbers and return only the remainder. If either number is a floating-point number, the result is a floating-point number that represents the remainder.

    Example 2

    The following example demonstrates the potential imprecision of floating-point operands. In the first statement, the operands are Double , and 0.2 is an infinitely repeating binary fraction with a stored value of 0.20000000000000001. In the second statement, the literal type character D forces both operands to Decimal , and 0.2 has a precise representation.

    How to add two numbers in visual basic

    Calculating the sum of three numbers can easily be accomplished using a Windows Forms Project in Visual Basic. The best thing to do is to let the user enter the three numbers using text boxes then you can get the values programmatically. In VB, you can use the “+” operator to add numbers and save the result to a variable. The operator can be used to add two or more numbers.

    Launch Microsoft Visual Basic Express and click “New Project” on the left pane of your computer screen. Click “Visual Basic” below Installed Templates, then click “Windows Forms Application,” and then click “OK” to start a new project.

    Double-click the “TextBox” control on the “Toolbox” pane to add one to your form. Add two more text boxes and a “Button” using the same technique.

    Double-click the button to create a button click event. Add the following code to create your variables:

    Dim firstNum As Integer

    Dim secondNum As Integer
    Dim thirdNum As Integer

    Dim result As Integer

    Get the numbers entered in the text boxes.

    firstNum = Convert.ToInt32(Me.TextBox1.Text)
    secondNum = Convert.ToInt32(Me.TextBox2.Text)

    Calculate the sum of the numbers.

    result = firstNum + secondNum + thirdNum
    Display the calculated result.

    In this part of the tutorial, you will learn Visual Basic procedures & functions.

    We use procedures and functions to create modular programs. Visual Basic statements are grouped in a block enclosed by Sub , Function and matching End statements. The difference between the two is that functions return values, procedures do not.

    A procedure and function is a piece of code in a larger program. They perform a specific task. The advantages of using procedures and functions are:

    • Reducing duplication of code
    • Decomposing complex problems into simpler pieces
    • Improving clarity of the code
    • Reuse of code
    • Information hiding

    Procedures

    A procedure is a block of Visual Basic statements inside Sub , End Sub statements. Procedures do not return values.

    This example shows basic usage of procedures. In our program, we have two procedures. The Main() procedure and the user defined SimpleProcedure() . As we already know, the Main() procedure is the entry point of a Visual Basic program.

    Each procedure has a name. Inside the Main() procedure, we call our user defined SimpleProcedure() procedure.

    Procedures are defined outside the Main() procedure. Procedure name follows the Sub statement. When we call a procedure inside the Visual Basic program, the control is given to that procedure. Statements inside the block of the procedure are executed.

    Procedures can take optional parameters.

    In the above example, we pass some values to the Addition() procedure.

    Here we call the Addition() procedure and pass two parameters to it. These parameters are two Integer values.

    We define a procedure signature. A procedure signature is a way of describing the parameters and parameter types with which a legal call to the function can be made. It contains the name of the procedure, its parameters and their type, and in case of functions also the return value. The ByVal keyword specifies how we pass the values to the procedure. In our case, the procedure obtains two numerical values, 55 and 32. These numbers are added and the result is printed to the console.

    Functions

    A function is a block of Visual Basic statements inside Function , End Function statements. Functions return values.

    There are two basic types of functions. Built-in functions and user defined ones. The built-in functions are part of the Visual Basic language. There are various mathematical, string or conversion functions.

    In the preceding example, we use two math functions and one string function. Built-in functions help programmers do some common tasks.

    In the following example, we have a user defined function.

    Two values are passed to the function. We add these two values and return the result to the Main() function.

    Addition function is called. The function returns a result and this result is assigned to the result variable.

    This is the Addition function signature and its body. It also includes a return data type, for the returned value. In our case is is an Integer . Values are returned to the caller with the Return keyword.

    Passing parameters by value, by reference

    Visual Basic supports two ways of passing parameters to functions. By value and by reference. For this, we have two keywords. ByVal and ByRef . When we pass arguments by value, the function works only with the copies of the values. This may lead to performance overheads, when we work with large amounts of data.

    When we pass values by reference, the function receives a reference to the actual values. The original values are affected, when modified. This way of passing values is more time and space efficient. On the other hand, it is more error prone.

    Which way of passing arguments should we use? It depends on the situation. Say we have a set of data, salaries of employees. If we want to compute some statistics of the data, we do not need to modify them. We pass by values. If we work with large amounts of data and the speed of computation is critical, we pass by reference. If we want to modify the data, e.g. do some reductions or raises to the salaries, we might pass by reference.

    The following two examples cover both concepts.

    The Swap() procedure swaps the numbers between the a and b variables. The original variables are not affected.

    At the beginning, these two variables are initiated.

    We call the Swap() procedure. The procedure takes a and b variables as parameters.

    Inside the Swap() procedure, we change the values. Note that the a and b variables are defined locally. They are valid only inside the Swap() procedure.

    The output shows that the original variables were not affected.

    The next code example passes values to the function by reference. The original variables are changed inside the Swap() procedure.

    In this example, calling the Swap() procedure will change the original values.

    Now we use the ByRef keyword to indicate that we pass parameters by reference.

    Here we see that the Swap() procedure really changed the values of the variables.

    Recursion

    Recursion, in mathematics and computer science, is a method of defining functions in which the function being defined is applied within its own definition. In other words, a recursive function calls itself to do its job. Recursion is a widely used approach to solve many programming tasks.

    A typical example is calculation of the factorial.

    In this code example, we calculate the factorial of two numbers.

    Inside the body of the factorial function, we call the factorial function with a modified argument. The function calls itself.

    These are the results.

    Module scope, procedure scope

    A scope is the range in which a variable can be referenced. A variable which is declared inside the procedure has a procedure scope. It is valid only in this particular procedure. A variable declared inside a module has a module scope. It is valid everywhere in the module.

    In the preceding example, we declare two variables. Variable a has the module scope, variable b has the procedure scope.

    Variable a is declared inside the Example module, outside the two procedures. It is valid in both procedures.

    The variable b is declared in the Main() procedure. It is valid only there. It is not valid in the second procedure.

    The statement printing the b variable is commented. If we uncommented the line, the example would not compile.

    In the preceding example, we have declared a variable with the same name in two different scopes. They do not collide. The variable declared inside the Main() procedure overrides the one, declared in the module scope.

    Static variables

    A static variable is a variable that has been allocated statically, whose lifetime extends across the entire run of the program. (Wikipedia) The default, local variables do not retain their value within consecutive calls of the function.

    In the above example, we have a normal, non-static variable. We increment the variable each time the function is called. We call the function 5 times. However, non-static variables are initiated for each call of the function.

    After 5 function calls the x variable equals to 1.

    The static variables are initiated only once, when the function is first called. They retain their value afterwards.

    After 5 consecutive calls, the x is equal to 5.

    Static variables are created with the Static keyword.

    Running the example.

    In this part of the Visual Basic tutorial, we covered procedures and functions.

    Line numbers!? Yup, just like those used in “real” Basic. Bear with me here-I’ll convince you!

    In older versions of Basic, line numbers were mandatory and often used as “jump targets.” A jump target is a line number used with a GoTo, such as GoTo 2000. The 2000 identifies the start of a block of code to execute next. After GoTo came GoSub (and Return). Now you had a “Basic subroutine,” albeit one with a strange name: GoSub 2000. You can think of the (line) number almost as an address (just as in C). These days, of course, Basic is Visual Basic and we use symbolic names for labeling such jump targets (real subroutines, just like those in C and other programming languages). Line numbers have become a peculiarity designed to allow nothing more than some level of backward compatibility with some other version of Basic.

    Or then again, maybe not. In Visual Basic, Erl, a Visual Basic (undocumented in Visual Basic 4, 5, and 6 but present in all versions of Visual Basic thus far) “global variable,” gives you access to the line number of any erroring line of code. So by using line numbers and by using Erl in your error handlers, you can determine which line of code erred-wow! What happens to Erl if you don’t use line numbers? Easy-it will always be 0.

    Of course, you won’t want to start typing line numbers in by hand. You need some automation. At TMS, we add line numbers to our code using an internal tool we originally developed for working with Visual Basic 2. It now works as an add-in under Visual Basic 6. There are tools on the market that can do the same for your code.

    At TMS, we don’t work with line numbers in our source code, however. We add them only when we’re doing a ship build-that is, when we want to ship a binary to, say, beta testers or to manufacturing for an impending release. We use our internal tool to build a new version of the code, complete with line numbers, and then we make an executable from that. We store the line numbered source code in our source control system and ship the executable. We cross-reference the EXE version number (the Auto Increment option is just great here) to the source code stored in the source control system. Every time we do a new build for shipping, we create a new subproject whose name is the version number of the build and then store the line numbered source code in it along with a copy of the binary image. If an error report comes in, we can easily refer back to the source code to find the erroring line (very easy if you’re using Microsoft Visual SourceSafe). Typically, the error report will contain details of the module, routine, and line number of the error.

    Listing 1-2 is a typical Click event, line numbers and all.

    Notice in Listing 1-2 that sProcSig is made up of the module name (Form1) and the routine name (Command1_Click). Notice also that the error handler examines Erl to “see” whether line numbers have been used. Figure 1-1 shows what’s typically displayed when an error occurs using this kind of scheme.

    Figure 1-1 Error and line number information

    Of course, the actual code that makes up the error handler is entirely up to you. If you use this scheme, I recommend you have a module-level constant to hold your module name and use a routine-level constant to hold the routine name plus the module name: