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How to add track markers in audacity

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Inserting track markers in Audacity Is it possible?

#1 soundspider

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I'm looking to do a mini edit of a church service in Audacity and want to insert track markers so that when I burn it to CD it will appear with several tracks on it ie. 1st hymn is track 1, reading/prayer track 2, sermon track 3 etc. Is this possible on Audacity? Have tried splitting the one track into several but when I export to WAV it just sums them together as a mono track. The help section doesn't help either!

#2 handyandi

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This post has been edited by handyandi: 10 May 2011 – 11:18 AM

#3 mar

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#4 soundspider

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#5 handyandi

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This post has been edited by handyandi: 10 May 2011 – 12:18 PM

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#7 abbotsmike

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Grahame, on 11 May 2011 – 08:55 AM, said:

The last time I used audacity to split up one long track I chopped it about manually, not even thinking that there could be a better way! Oh well, least I know now!

How to add track markers in audacity

Select and create labels: Audacity is the perfect platform to record and edit your tracks, recordings, and audios. It is easy to use, and completely user friendly. It provides a large variety of features and enhancements for its users. People love and enjoy using Audacity.

Along with so many other features, Audacity provides a feature of creating and selecting labels. Labels are useful in marking a place in your audio. It may be the place where you make some change, or the place where you are editing your audio. It can be anything.

Labels turn out to be very useful to the users. They make it easier to recognize a particular place in the audio. So, in Audacity, you can easily create and select labels. If you have to select or create a label, then you might find this helpful. Also, you can visit Audacity’s manual page for complete information in detail anytime.

How to create a label?

Creating a label in Audacity will help you mark annotations in your audio wherever you wish. To create a label in Audacity, you need to follow the given steps:

  • First, select the audio section with the help of your mouse.
  • Click on the Edits option.
  • Now, click on labels.
  • Click on Add label selection.

(You can also use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+B, to perform the same task.)

  • Then, the cursor will take its position inside the label, you need to type the name of the label
  • Press Enter

A vertical yellow line will appear at the need of the first label. This will make it easy to identify the label. After question, you need to create the answer label. For this, follow the given steps:

  • Click on edit
  • Click on labels
  • Then click on Add selection to label
  • Type the label name
  • Press Enter

How to add track markers in audacity

Alternate methods of using point labels

Instead of using region labels, you can also use point labels if you wish. To use this, you can simply click on any point and then follow the same steps as earlier. Basically, click on edit, then labels, and then add a label to selection. Similarly, you can do it for the other parts as well.

Add labels while playing or recording audio

When you record or play audio, you can still add some labels. To create a point label, you can follow the given steps:

  • Click on edit
  • Click on labels
  • Select the option ‘Add labels at playback position’

To add region labels, you can select that particular region, and follow the same steps.

How to select a label?

After creating the label, the next task is to select that label. Selecting a label is very easy in Audacity. To select a label, you can simply click inside the label. This will help you open the label, so that you can edit its text. And, Audacity restores the cursor position, or the region of selection.

How to add track markers in audacity

Just follow these simple steps, to select a label. Click here to learn more.

How to add track markers in audacity

-this is one audio file recorded with one microphone

Stereo track

How to add track markers in audacity

-this is one audio file with a left and right track recorded with a stereo microphone. Stereo tracks can be split into two mono tracks.

Label track

How to add track markers in audacity

-this track allows you to add markers or regional markers to the whole project or individual tracks

Track Control Panel

Click on the black arrow to view a pull down list of options for each track – allows you to rename the track, provides sample information, waveform view, spectrogram view, mute or solo the track, increase volume and pan left-right function.

Waveform view: vertical axis represents amplitude or loudness and the horizontal axix represents time.
Spectogram view:the horizontal axis represents time, the vertical axis is frequency; a third dimension indicating the amplitude of a particular frequency at a particular time is represented by the intensity or colour of each point in the image.

Editing

Playback

Listen to your project hit the spacebar on your keyboard to Stop or Play

Zooming

Zooming In/Out helps you make accurate selections of your waveform.

Selection Tool

Highlight a portion of audio using your Selection Tool

How to add track markers in audacity

Labeling Tracks

Label tracks and take notes of your project Listen to your audio and make labels.

  1. Go to Tracks > Add New > Label Tracks
  2. Edit > Labels > Add Label at Selection (cmd+B)
  3. Name your label.
  4. Use Tab on your keyboard to select forwards to the next label, and SHIFT+Tab to select backwards to the previous label.

Editing Audio

  1. Open a blank track – this will be your working pallet.
    1. Tracks > Mono track or Stereo Track

    Envelope

    Let’s you control a tracks volume changes smoothly over time.

    1. Select the envelope tool.
    2. Click a beginning, end, and middle point on your audio waveform.
    3. Click and hold on a point to increase or decrease the volume.

    Effects

    Equalization

    Allows you to increase or decrease desired frequencies.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    Noise Removal

    Removes unwanted background noise.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    Normalize

    Increases the overall volume of your waveform equally.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    Exporting

    File > Export this command exports the entire project except muted tracks.

    File > Export Selection this command exports only selected tracks.

    Forum rules
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    For help with current Audacity, please post to the 2.x. board for your operating system.

    Please post feedback about the current 2.x version on the 2.x.feedback board.

    Place track markers while recording

    Post by Norm Mast » Sun Apr 18, 2010 8:05 pm

    Re: Place track markers while recording

    Post by steve » Sun Apr 18, 2010 9:30 pm

    Re: Place track markers while recording

    Post by waxcylinder » Mon Apr 19, 2010 11:00 am

    As Steve says CTRL+M will place a marker at the current recording position (or playback position if in play made rather than recording).

    Nte that you can also place a point label or a range label elsewhere in the track by clicking, or clicking and dragging, on the required selection and then pressing CTRL+B

    Re: Place track markers while recording

    Post by Norm Mast » Fri May 28, 2010 12:22 pm

    Re: Place track markers while recording

    Post by Storer » Fri May 28, 2010 5:14 pm

    Some other useful key commands are ‘[‘ and ‘]’ during playback or recording. The left bracket ‘[‘ will start a selection, which will continue to expand as the audio position moves. The right bracket ‘]’ will stop selecting at that point. Now a CTRL-B UPARROW will mark the selection with a range label. Unless you can use a keyboard macros some way to send ]CTRL-B-UPARROW with one keystroke, this technique takes long enough that you can’t place these range labels very close together.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    How to add track markers in audacity

    Audacity is great for preparing DJ mixes for burning to CD, and it’s also free.

    Digital DJ Tips reader Nonso writes: “I have done a mixtape using Serato SL4, which I’d like to burn onto a CD. I had to convert the file to MP3, because it was too big to fit onto a CD otherwise. It is currently a continuous mix without tracks, though. I’d like to know how I can break it into individual tracks. Also what is the commonest music file format to have one’s mixtape in?”

    Digital DJ Tips says:

    There are two things here.

    Firstly, file format. You’re confusing data CDs with audio CDs. It is possible to burn a file (MP3, WAV, whatever) onto a CD as a digital computer file, in the same way you can burn pictures, or programs onto disc. But what you end up with here are data CDs that can then only be read by other computer CD drives (or if you’ve burned MP3s or other digital audio files, sometimes by specialist CD players). This is what you have been doing, but it’s not the right way to burn an audio CD. Instead, you want to do just that – select “audio CD” rather than “data CD” on your burning software. Then, you’ll get a universally playable audio disc, and as long as your original mix was 74 minutes or shorter (or 80, depending on your CDs and burner) it will fit onto the CD just fine.

    Regarding adding track markers, you can do this (as well as label the track names) using a great free program called Audacity to prepare your audio. There are a couple of hoops to jump through to make sure you have gapless audio, though, which is obviously necessary for DJ mixes.

    In short, though, Audacity lets you label a great long waveform, similar to the one in your DJ software, with little flags like cue markers that mark where you want track breaks, titles and so on. The exact instructions as to how to do all of this are in the Audacity help file, but it’s simple enough once you get the hang of it.

    Do you have a favourite trick or piece of software you always use when turning digital DJ mixes into CDs? Got any more advice to add for Nonso? Please feel free to do so in the comments.

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    How To Create A Four-On-The-Floor Beat Using Audacity

    How to add track markers in audacity

    There are many ways to compose music on a computer. If you’re familiar with my beat breakdowns, you most likely know by now that I love to use FL Studio 12 to make beats. It’s not the only program recommendable. Audacity is another commonly used software for musical composition, and you can download it for free online.

    If you would like to make a simple four-on-the-floor drumbeat on Audacity, here’s how.

    1. OPENING YOUR PROJECT

    When you open up Audacity and see the screen below, don’t bother with any other options than OK. Just click OK.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    2. ADDING A CLICK TRACK

    Audacity doesn’t come with an attached grid. We’ll create one.

    Go to Generate > Rhythm track.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    This adds a metronome to your entire track, in order to keep you on beat for additional add-ons. In the below window, leave everything as is. (Remember your tempo is 120 bpm.)

    How to add track markers in audacity

    Your click track will look like this.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    Now go to Analyze > Beat Finder.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    Once you’ve selected “Beat Finder,” you will see a “threshold” window. Don’t change it. This just tells you how sensitive it is.

    How to add track markers in audacity

    The threshold window will give you markers reading “B.”

    How to add track markers in audacity

    The clicks and the B’s are slightly “off,” meaning they don’t connect precisely. Let’s snap them together. First, zoom in by clicking the magnifying glass icon with a plus sign “+”.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Before you do anything else, make sure “snap to” on the bottom of your screen is selected, reading “Nearest.”

    Select the Time Shift Tool, then click “rewind.” (Time Shift first, then rewind.)
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Move your clicking sounds slightly right so they snap on a gold yellow line. This line will appear vertically from the B’s and lock the clicks and B’s together.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    3. IMPORTING DRUM SOUNDS

    3a. SNARE

    Go to File > Import > Audio. (Or type Ctrl+Shift+I.)
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Import a kick. Any one. (Here’s one I chose.)
    How to add track markers in audacity

    (In that folder, I found this.)
    How to add track markers in audacity

    (Once you’ve selected your kick, you’ll get an “FFmpeg not found” window. It doesn’t mean much. Just click OK.)
    How to add track markers in audacity

    A kick should appear below the B’s.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Snap the kick in place by selecting Time Shift Tool then “rewind.” (Just like you did for the clicks.)
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Loop this kick seven times at every half-second mark (plus approximately 17 milliseconds to keep on beat with the metronome). Click the selection tool (shaped like an uppercase I) and highlight the kick from its beginning to the next clicking sound (where the yellow line snaps you in place).

    To really make sure you’re selection is accurately half a second apart, go down to the bottom of your screen and type your start and end markers exactly 0.5 seconds from each other.

    Now go to Effect > Repeat.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Type “7” in the empty box to repeat your kick 8 times.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    3b.HI-HAT

    Just follow the same instructions you used to add the kicks. The only difference should be importing a hi-hat instead of a kick.

    3c. SNARE

    In File > Import > Audio, pick any snare.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Snap the snare to the SECOND clicking sound.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    When selecting the loop containing the snare that you wish to repeat, make sure it’s one second apart, not a half second.

    Select Effects > Repeat to repeat the snare “3” times instead of “7.”

    4. EXPORTING

    Before you export this project, delete the track with the clicking and the track with the B’s. Click the X on each track to the left of “Audio Track.” After that, they should be gone.

    (This step is optional. You can loop your whole composition four times by typing Ctrl+A to select all tracks, making sure your selection is four seconds apart on the bottom of the screen, and typing “3” in the Effects > Repeat box to insert three repetitions.)

    Now go to File > Export.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Use WAV this time. (MP3 exporting requires a plug-in I’m not sure comes with what you use.) Just save any random WAV file name to what’s below.
    How to add track markers in audacity

    Add metadata (optional).
    How to add track markers in audacity

    5. MORE ON AUDACITY

    Audacity is a powerful software, yet it has limitations. Luckily, these limitations allow producers to think “outside the box.”

    If you are looking for the best place to buy beats online, you’ve come to the right place. License Lounge has the latest dirty south beats available from our exclusive industry producers.

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    If I have a 90 minute audio file. When I put "tracks" every 10 minutes, I have 9 separate audio files. Is there a way to put track markers and leave one file?

    If I want to go 20 minutes ahead, with a marker I can just push "next" 2 times. I don’t need to rename it, I just want to be able to jump ahead.

    Is there a way to do this in audacity?

    Member Join Date Jul 2001 Location Yank in Europe
    Member Join Date Jul 2001 Location Yank in Europe
    Member Join Date Oct 2001 Location Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Originally Posted by hech54

    Actually, it DID catch on in the CD world, just more in Classical Music & concert CDs (I own scores that make use of them). Problems have occurred because most cheaper players – read MOST – don’t allow one to jump to the index (which is why it didn’t further catch on in other areas of CD publishing).
    It also DOES exist within audio files: WAV, AIFF & SD2 have index/"region" markers, and MP4/AAC/M4A and MKA have "chapter" markers". Just not a lot of apps make use of them (either to create/edit or to read/play).

    Member Join Date Jul 2001 Location Yank in Europe
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia
    Originally Posted by hech54

    Actually, it DID catch on in the CD world, just more in Classical Music & concert CDs (I own scores that make use of them). Problems have occurred because most cheaper players – read MOST – don’t allow one to jump to the index (which is why it didn’t further catch on in other areas of CD publishing).
    It also DOES exist within audio files: WAV, AIFF & SD2 have index/"region" markers, and MP4/AAC/M4A and MKA have "chapter" markers". Just not a lot of apps make use of them (either to create/edit or to read/play).

    Member Join Date Oct 2001 Location Deep in the Heart of Texas

    Wow! Seems I can’t hold a candle to you in that regard.

    Just trying to avoid the continued propagation of untruths. I wouldn’t (often) feel the need to clarify/refine/refute if overbroad & inaccurate pronunciations weren’t put out there first. Take it however you want to (well, we know how that turned out).

    Member Join Date Jul 2001 Location Yank in Europe
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia

    Wow! Seems I can’t hold a candle to you in that regard.

    Just trying to avoid the continued propagation of untruths. I wouldn’t (often) feel the need to clarify/refine/refute if overbroad & inaccurate pronunciations weren’t put out there first. Take it however you want to (well, we know how that turned out).

    My answer to the OP, straight forward and simple:
    "I don’t think you are going to find an easy way to accomplish what you are hoping to do"

    YOUR answer:
    "You are SO wrong useless technical garbeldy-gook useless technical garbeldy-gook useless technical garbeldy-gook useless technical garbeldy-gook I’m so smart allow me to show you how smart I am useless technical garbeldy-gook useless technical garbeldy-gook useless technical garbeldy-gook knowing all of this won’t help you at all because not a lot of apps make use of them, just like Hech54 alluded to.

    Is that about right?
    You do this to EVERY noobie you come across. How is this helping?

    It’s a common problem that you record a track in the free open-source Audacity program, and then you remember or realize something you should have said. Sometimes you can insert audio like that to the end of the track – and you’d do that using the “append record” tool. Or, you can also insert audio like that into the middle of a track. It’s a bit more complicated to do, but can be done. In this video tutorial for Audacity, I’m going to show you how to do both, using the Append Record function, the split function, the time shift tool, and the cut, copy, and paste functions in Audacity.


    I’d love to make more of these tutorials that hit exactly on the needs you have! So please, let me know what you need help with and I’ll be happy to work out a tutorial on that sort of thing using Audacity!

    Send me your feedback and suggestions for additional tutorials and I’ll get right on them!

    7 comments to Use “Append Record” in Audacity & insert audio into a track – Intermediate Tutorial #4

    Here’s why the term “append record” isn’t making sense to you:

    * It’s *not* “append record” where “record” is a noun with the accent on the first syllable (rek’-erd).

    * It’s “append record” where “record” is a verb with the accent on the second syllable (ri-kôrd’). The word “append” means to add at the end of something. So, you are “record-ing” (note the accent on the second syllable) at the end of the marker or track.

    Thanks Clark. I figured that out after I recorded the video and felt really embarrassed, but just left it. I think it’s OK to show my own stupidity sometimes. I am human after all. Thanks for being willing to embarrass me even more 🙂 No offense taken, really.

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    mightyyt – Posted – 08/20/2015: 19:05:33

    Does anyone have a way to add count ins in from of an MP3 file? I like to try to play along at times but can't figure out how to jump in right at the start.

    minstrelmike – Posted – 08/20/2015: 19:38:08

    Load it into Audacity and attach a click track to it.

    rudy – Posted – 08/21/2015: 05:14:46

    Most people wanting to do this would probably:

    1. Import the mp3 into an audio editor, converting the mp3 into a wav file in the process.

    2. Listen to the imported track on headphones and record a good count ("1, 2, 3. ") at the beginning of the tune form the second time around.

    3. Slide the newly recorded count to the start position and then slide the tune wav file to the right on the time line until the tune starts after the count.

    4. Render the two tracks as a new recording and convert that to a new mp3 if desired.

    Myself? I'd probably go the whole lot easier route of just listening and jumping in at the top of the second A section.

    Edited by – rudy on 08/21/2015 05:15:46

    mightyyt – Posted – 08/23/2015: 21:35:38

    thanks Rudy. after a couple of hours monkeying with technology, think your method might work best!

    minstrelmike – Posted – 08/24/2015: 07:41:07

    Just realized using Rudy's idea with Audacity would be pretty easy.

    I record a lot of jam and band stuff with my digital and load it into Audacity and easily cut out entire sections. That's pretty much all I do with it. There is a way to add click tracks but it's easier to _start_ with them like in a regular recording studio than add them to something already done.

    HOWEVER, you could mark out the first A part, duplicate it and add it to the front in just a minute or so and then jump in on "2nd" A part (or even cut down the first A to just the last half or last line).

    Since I already use Audacity, that's going to be a kewl way of making intros to already recorded stuff.

    rudy – Posted – 08/24/2015: 09:39:42

    quote:
    Originally posted by minstrelmike

    Just realized using Rudy's idea with Audacity would be pretty easy.

    I record a lot of jam and band stuff with my digital and load it into Audacity and easily cut out entire sections. That's pretty much all I do with it. There is a way to add click tracks but it's easier to _start_ with them like in a regular recording studio than add them to something already done.

    HOWEVER, you could mark out the first A part, duplicate it and add it to the front in just a minute or so and then jump in on "2nd" A part (or even cut down the first A to just the last half or last line).

    Since I already use Audacity, that's going to be a kewl way of making intros to already recorded stuff.

    Once you load your wav to Audacity you could also listen back and the record a simple lead in count on your portable recorder. Transfer that to a new track in your Audacity project and slide 'em around till you're satisfied.

    Render your new project and you're done.

    If audio editing is familiar it's quite easy to do stuff like this. If you're not used to an audio editor not so much. What isn't apparent is the ease that all this stuff can be done if you familiarize yourself with any of the editing programs. Just imagine what it would be like to write a novel today without a word processor and you can begin to appreciate what an audio editing program can do for you.

    Veerstryngh Thynner – Posted – 08/25/2015: 15:58:11

    I have been using Audacity myself, since several years, and I'm a big fan. But not so much of its in-built click track: not loud enough for me, when recording. My old and battered five-octave Gem keyboard serves that purpose much better.

    My home studio sessions usually start with putting in 3 or 4 minutes of click track. Since average song duration of 3 minutes has become more or less the norm, that extra minute offers a bit of margin (in case you'd like to expand your ideas on the spur).

    Have your instrument ready, hit record, and, after 4-8 ticks/clicks have passed, play a couple of bars of the song/tune you''re building. Next, hit Stop and return to track start (under Transport). Subsequently, switch track to Mute. You won't need it any longer, but don't remove it yet: it still comes in useful as visual mark of where the intro ends and the song starts.

    Tip: it's sensible to make a note of the tempo (or bpm = beats per minute) chosen. You may want to try (a) different pace(s), along the way, so you'd need some reminder of the tempo you originally started out with. However, be advised that changing tempo too often will most definitely distort your score's overall sound quality.

    After you laid down all your tracks to satisfaction and fine-tuned balance, reverb, EQ etc, you might want to turn your fruit of labour into a MP3 stereo master for BHO. Save your score: this 'll be your original, to copy from in case it's needed at some other time (click track included). Choose Edit>Select and highlight the whole lot (All). Copy that and paste it into a brand new Audacity score.

    This version is going to be your MP3 stereo mix template. The click track won't be needed any longer here, so might just as wel be removed entirely (Tracks>Remove Tracks). Same applies to the marker mentioned in the third paragraph. Furthermore, the gap between Audacity's 0.0 mark and playback start should be no more than 2 seconds. And if there are still "tails left at the end, these too can easily be cut.

    Go to Edit>Select>All once more. With everything highlighted now, select File>Export. In the "Save" pop-up window now appearing, select the format you want to export your score to (.mp3) and tell your system where you'd like your .mp3 audio file to be saved. Hit Enter – and after a little while your MP3 will be ready for sharing with the banjo community.

    Tip: alternatively, if tracks 1 & 2 are click & marker tracks, copy track 3 and paste it into your endmix template; subsequently, export it to .mp3, in the manner described – but IN MONO. Repeat procedure with further tracks remaining (except click & marker, of course). In this way, you'll have created an "archive" of each separate track – in case you'd like to make another, slightly different version of your endmix, at some time.

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    and the exact three-section version number of Audacity from “Audacity menu > About Audacity“.

    Audacity 1.2.x and 1.3.x are obsolete and no longer supported. If you still have those versions, please upgrade at https://www.audacityteam.org/download/.
    The old forums for those versions are now closed, but you can still read the archives of the 1.2.x and 1.3.x forums.

    Setting Track Markers

    Post by brbrown » Wed Sep 30, 2015 3:12 pm

    I am using an iMac OS XI 10.10.5 Yosemite with Audacity and iTunes.

    I have recorded one of my choir concerts composed of twenty songs. I wish to set individual track markers so they show on my player. I have read both the tutorial manual and many of the posts here but I still can’t understand how to mark them. When I used Windows with different software, I was able to move a cursor along and click where I wanted the marker to appear. Is it the same with Audacity? If so how do I find the cursor?

    Re: Setting Track Markers

    Post by Gale Andrews » Wed Sep 30, 2015 4:38 pm

    Have you got as far as click in the track, hold the COMMAND key then press B to add a label at the click point? Splitting a recording into separate tracks – Audacity Manual.

    What is your player – a CD player?

    Or are you trying to mark songs within the same single MP3 file so you can skip between the songs? You can’t do that with MP3. It is simpler to just export one file for each song. iTunes will usually play the songs gaplessly.

    Re: Setting Track Markers

    Post by brbrown » Wed Sep 30, 2015 5:13 pm

    Hello Gale. Thanks for the reply. I was actually trying to mark the start of each of the songs on the overall recording so that they would show up in number order. I could then write a label with song names and know where to find any particular song to play back. From what you say, this is not possible.

    I have a difficulty trying to record each song as individual tracks because my tape player and amplifier is in another room so I I have to trail a cable through and would need to run in and out to stop and start the recording which is not very practical. Also, some of the songs have a piano accompaniment lead in to the next one. However, I’ll give it a try and record those songs joined together as one

    I want the flexibility to play the final CD in my car, on my Rotel CD player and one other household player. Regards Brian.

    Re: Setting Track Markers

    Post by Gale Andrews » Wed Sep 30, 2015 5:42 pm

    brbrown wrote: I was actually trying to mark the start of each of the songs on the overall recording so that they would show up in number order. I could then write a label with song names and know where to find any particular song to play back. From what you say, this is not possible.

    I have a difficulty trying to record each song as individual tracks because my tape player and amplifier is in another room so I I have to trail a cable through and would need to run in and out to stop and start the recording which is not very practical. Also, some of the songs have a piano accompaniment lead in to the next one. However, I’ll give it a try and record those songs joined together as one

    I want the flexibility to play the final CD in my car, on my Rotel CD player and one other household player.

    The simplest way is to use COMMAND + B to label each song for export to its own WAV file. Burn each WAV file as a separate CD track.

    Set the track burning gap in iTunes to zero. As long as your CD burning drive supports gapless burning and your CD players support gapless playback, you should not hear a gap between the CD tracks.

    If you want artist and other information to show up in the CD player, enable burning of CD-Text in iTunes.

    If you still hear a gap between the songs that should play continuously, then you can try exporting a single WAV file and burn as one CD track using a Cue Sheet. That is also covered in the Burning Tutorial, in the Gapless Burning section. iTunes does not support Cue Sheets as far as I know, so you may have to use another CD burning software than iTunes.