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How to add a betta to a community tank

Are you currently searching for betta fish care tips? Have you ever wondered how to care for a betta fish in a community fish tank? Well, the good news is that you may be able to do just that. However, the success of your community tank depends on the aggressiveness of your fish and their tank mates, your betta’s unique personality (whether their a social fish or loner), and the effectiveness of your aquascape in allowing adequate space and hiding spaces for your fish and their tank mates. Additionally, there are other things that you should watch out when you’re successfully engaging in betta fish care when there are more than one fish in your aquarium.

Match Water Parameters

Your betta prefers warm water, ideally between 78-80 degrees, with a pH of about 7.0. For a successful community tank, you will want to only include fish that will be comfortable in that same range. For instance, you can’t pair a goldfish with a betta as goldfish prefer colder temperatures and won’t thrive in warm water. Additionally, goldfish are very messy and tend to pollute their water very quickly. This can lead to dangerous nitrates and ammonia spikes that can be deadly to bettas. Some great examples of suitable tankmates are:

  • Ember Tetras
  • Harlequin Rasboras
  • Cory Catfish

Matching Fish Temperament

Your betta is a territorial animal and will not tolerate other fish that he considers as a competitor. For this reason, it is smart to avoid pairing him with other fish that have long, flashy fins, like male guppies. Because your betta has such long, beautiful fins, swimming quickly can be a problem. This is good because smaller tetras and rasboras can outswim sudden aggression, but it can be a problem if his tankmates turn out to be fin-nippers. Danios and neon tetras are both known for nipping, and your betta will struggle to escape this. Nipped fins may become infected, so be on the lookout for any of this behavior.

Do Not Overstock Your Tank

Overstocked tanks lead to poor water conditions, stress, illness, and aggressive behaviors. Bettas are known for inhabiting small tanks, but a community tank must have enough room for everyone to be comfortable. The fish that pair best with bettas are schooling fish, meaning you will need room in your tank for a minimum of three each, preferably six to ten. A ten-gallon tank is the very smallest recommended for a community tank, while a twenty-gallon or larger would give you much more flexibility.

Create Separate Territories

Even in a smaller tank, plants and decorations can be used to create separate spaces to properly care for betta fish. Breaking up sightlines will give fish a sense of separation that can reduce aggression. Your betta will want a place to rest, and your smaller fish will want plants they can dart through to escape any unwanted attention.

Add Your Betta Last

If your betta is alone in a tank, he will be much less receptive to new additions than if he is the one added to an already established tank. If you do already have your betta alone in a tank you would like to make communal, pull him out, rearrange all the décor and plants, add the new fish in and give them time to acclimate, and only then reintroduce your betta. The change in scenery will make it feel like a brand new tank, and he will be more accepting of his new tankmates this way.

Have a Backup Plan for Betta Fish Care

Sometimes, even with the best planning, your particular betta will not tolerate other tankmates. You should have a fully cycled backup tank ready in case your betta is particularly territorial and needs to live without other fish. Even if you cannot have other fish, very rarely does your betta need to live entirely alone. Nerite snails and sometimes ghost shrimp can be good companions for these types of betta.

Betta fish care isn’t easy but it is certainly possible to be successful at it. Bettas are beautiful and personable companions, and communal tanks can be a wonderful enrichment. Do your research and best of luck in acclimating your betta and its tank mates.

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How to add a betta to a community tank

The Betta fish are also called “Siamese fighting fish” or the “Japanese fighting fish”.

So, just from the name, you can tell it is no surprise that they are notorious and famous for being quite aggressive towards other fish.

It is not easy to find a tank mate for a betta since they will not be too friendly with each other.

Choosing a wrong tank mate for your betta can cause comfortabilities, injuries, and even death to at least one of your fish.

However, it is not impossible. There are quite a few types of fish that can co-habitat happily with betta.

There are a few guidelines you should follow and some extensive selection you have to make to find a perfect tank mate for your betta.

We are here to help you ease the burden of choosing the right one.

Table of Contents

Can Two Betta Fish Live Together?

I just want to make this very clear from the very beginning. No, two betta fish should not live together.

If you think, because two betta fish are alike especially with environmental requirements and food, they will best live together. That is not true, especially when talking about two male betta fish.

Betta fish are very territorial. Besides the fact that the two male betta fish will end up fighting and hurt each other, just the fact that they are sharing the same space will stress them out greatly. And a stressed beta is more likely to fight with its stressor.

Unlike its male friends, female betta fish can live together in the same tank. A tank with multiple female betta fish are called betta fish sorority tanks and they look pretty.

However, they are still aggressive and territorial. So even though it is possible, it is difficult and takes lots of efforts and attention from the owner.

So if you are not an experienced fish keeper, I don’t recommend keeping a betta fish sorority tank in the beginning.

A Checklist for Starter

As you learn more and more about betta fish and your fish, in particular, you would know what works best for your fish and you can add or take out what you need from the checklist.

But for now, here is a simple checklist to start off your search to find a tank mate for your betta.

  • No nibblers or biters: betta fish are aggressive by nature. They can attack another fish just for being in their area. So you can imagine the outcome if they live with another fish that often bites. If a fish nibbles at the betta, they will get bitten back for sure.
  • No bigger fish: bigger fish can appear intimidating for the betta. Being close to the presence of an intimidating fish can easily trigger the betta’s fighting mode and you don’t want that.
  • No more colorful fish: similar to sizes, a colorful fish can be intimidating for betta. So you also need to avoid getting a colorful tank mate for your betta buddy.
  • Check aquarium size: betta fish are very territorial. Regardless of how many fish are in the tank, the betta fish alone needs at least 5 gallons of water space for itself. Even if the betta fish doesn’t fight, having its personal space smaller than 5 gallons can cause great stress for your betta.
  • Check bottom feeders: bottom feeders are great fish to live with betta. Most of them can happily cohabitate with a betta fish. Check them out to see if you would like a bottom feeder in your tank.
  • Dietary requirement: remember to check the dietary requirement for both of your fish. Your other fish may or may not have the same dietary preferences and requirements like your betta. It is important to give both you fish a good and healthy diet. Cross-reference their diet to make sure that a thing that is not harmful to one fish will not be harmful to the other as well.
  • Tank ornaments: Sometimes the cohabitation of the two fish in your tank can be nurtured further by you. Add a few tank ornaments and live aquatic plants. In case, once in a while, a fish is intimidated, it can have some places to hide.

What Fish Can Live with a Betta Fish?

As you can see from the checklist, it is actually not that difficult to find a tank mate for your betta fish. Most of the fish that can satisfy the requirements in the checklist above are likely to be fine living with a betta fish.

However, if you are looking for some concrete guide instead of a general guideline, here are a few specific suggestions of the types of fish that can cohabitate nicely with betta.

Neon Tetra

How to add a betta to a community tank

Neon Tetra is the mid-tank area type of fish. Normally, they would keep their distance from the betta so they can get along quite well.

Neon Tetra is vibrant in color. Together with your betta, they will make your tank look very vibrant and colorful.

Betta and Neon Tetra in 10-gallon tank (peaceful!)

Bristlenose Pleco

How to add a betta to a community tank

They are usually pretty shy so they tend to be very reclusive. They would keep it to themselves and cohabitate nicely with your bettas.

However, bristle nose plecos can grow quite large sometimes so be careful with the size of your tank.

Glass Catfish

How to add a betta to a community tank

This fish is a cool species. They are completely see-through, and they are as calm as a fish can be. Needless to say, they can be the perfect tank mates for your bettas.

Blue Gourami

How to add a betta to a community tank

The Blue Gourami is closely related to the betta fish but they are not as aggressive. The similarity in their environmental requirements and dietary habits make them perfect tank mates for your bettas.

Cory Catfish

How to add a betta to a community tank

Cory catfish are calm, small, and white to dark gray in color. They appear as no threat to the betta fish. Betta fish and Cory Catfish can live together in the same tank harmoniously without any problem.

White Cloud Mountain Minnows

How to add a betta to a community tank

White Clouds are small, schooling fish with short fins and a pale gray, white color. They even share similar diet with the bettas. Keeping them together, you’ll have fewer things to worry about.

These are only a few popular species of fish that can cohabitate nicely with the bettas. But as said above, most of the fish that can satisfy the requirements in the checklist can be a betta fish tank mate.

You have plenty of options out there. Do not be afraid to venture out and do your research to find the ones most suited for you and your betta fish.

Hello! BettasAreSuperior here! So, the first time I set up a community tank was my planted
20 gallon long. I was quite excited BUT I wanted to add a betta to my peaceful community tank. Yes! A betta. But bettas are known to be fierce fighters. They are called Siamese fighting fish for a reason. Is my dream of a betta in a community tank crushed? Noooo! Okay, okay calm down. Just got to do some research.

The age-old question and myth: Can bettas be in peaceful community tanks?
Two words. It depends. I know that is not the answer you are looking for but there is no for-sure answer and if I told you yes, I would be lying. So, it totally depends on the betta’s personality. Some bettas are just not cut out for community tanks, while some are perfect for a peaceful tank. In order for a betta to “Qualify” for a community tank the betta needs to be peaceful, non-aggressive, and it can’t get irritated and it can’t have a temper easily. So, yes and no, bettas can be kept with community fish in a peaceful tank and it depends on the betta

How do I pick a peaceful betta if that even exists?
Well, yes, peaceful bettas exist despite the name. (Siamese fighting fish) Now, when I needed a peaceful betta for my 20 gallon long tank, I scoured the internet for how to find a peaceful betta. So, let’s jump into how to pick a peaceful betta. So, bettas are kept in cups. In order to see which betta is peaceful place the cups next to each other. The betta that doesn’t flare a lot and it ignores the other bettas, and isn’t interested in fighting is the one to go with.
That is a peaceful betta. That betta will be perfect for a community tank. The betta that flares a lot and is interested in fighting is aggressive, don’t pick it. It is an aggressive betta that will not be good for a community tank. You can also hold the bettas up to the guppy or tetra tanks at the store to gauge their reactions to them, I think that can be an even better indicator than the neighbor bettas. You may seem apprehensive about this technique but trust me. I have tried, multiple others have tried it and it works wonders. Don’t pick a betta that even flares a little. Pick the betta that doesn’t flare at all.

Help! I accidentally picked an aggressive betta! What do I do?!

Here are some options.

1. Rehome the betta. Don’t return it. The betta will probably go back in that cup. Save a life. Rehome it to a reliable person.

2. Get it a 5-gallon tank and put it in there by itself with live plants, sponge filter, and heater. Feed it some good food.

3. Put it in a breeder basket and see if things get better if not do one of the options listed above.

How do I add my betta into a community tank?

  • A breeder basket
  • Food that ALL your fish love and go cray cray for.
  • Your betta

Other helpful tips and tricks to consider

1. There’s a reason to go with both short-finned and long-finned bettas. If your other fish are small and more likely to be chased/hunted by the betta, get long fins- he’ll never be able to keep up with the little ones and they’ll be safe. If you have tankmates that are more prone to fin-nipping and more likely to bother your betta, go with short fins so the betta can escape.

My top 2 personal favorite tankmates for bettas in a 5 gallon

1. Shrimp. Shrimp have a very low bioload so, it is completely safe to add them. BUT wait. Bettas are carnivores and might attack shrimp. Besides, it is always helpful to add a cleanup crew. I have heard many success stories of betta with shrimp but I have heard many horror stories of betta attacking shrimp colonies like there’s no tomorrow so, try at your own risk. One tip if you are adding shrimp with your betta. Get Amano shrimp. They are bigger than most shrimp and there is less chance your betta will eat them.

2. Snails. It’s kinda a thing you hate or love. I don’t like them but they are great tankmates for bettas and they are a clean-up crew which is always helpful. They have a hard outer shell so, if your betta attacks them it doesn’t matter, the snail is safe.

My top 3 tankmates for a betta in a 10 gallon:

1. Pygmy corydoras. These fish are great with bettas, they are cute, and they are a cleanup crew! Which is always much appreciated!

2. Peaceful schooling fish. Any peaceful schooling fish that won’t bother your betta. it has to be sized for a 10 gallon and hardy.

3. Otocinclus. They are mostly wild-caught but if you give them repashy soilent green and blanched veggies they will gobble it right up and warm up to you. Not sponsored, but aquatic arts sells tank raised otocinclus. They are also very amazing at eating algae. Well, most types.

I am setting up a 55 gallon community tank and I was wondering if I could add 1 Betta fish. I know they can’t be with each other but I thought I heard that they can live with tetras and other schoolers. Thanks for the help!

In all honesty, it really depends on the betta. My first betta was a mellow little fellow, who worked with guppies (a big no no-long flow fins) and other fish that everyone said they couldn’t be together with. I found out all of this after getting the betta, so don’t judge. But, after the other betta died (hurricane sandy, couldn’t stand the cold) I got another one. This dude was a monster. He ate all my ghost shrimp, bothered snails, and attacked my guppies which fortunately survived. Anyway, what im trying to say is that it all depends on the betta. What fish are you exactly getting?

Silver hatchets, red wag platties, penguin tetras, black skirts, yellow phantoms an espei rasboras. Plus some cories. I can get a female betta so it isn’t too aggressive. Thanks
Oh and maybe some kuhli loaches!

Oh and I kinda have a random question- Why do my fish not float when they die? Whenever I have a fish loss then they are laying on the bottom. It seems that other people’s fish float lol. Thanks

I have no idea on that one. I get both if one of my fishes die (hasn’t happened ever since I joined this site-hehe) I think that list is okay, have you tried plugging it into aqadvisor to see if you have any compatibly issues?

Yeah for some reason it said that penguins are too aggressive to the hatchets but everyone I asked on here has said it’s fine. I’ll try with a calmer female betta for the tank. Thanks.

Instead of a beta can I add a pair of rams to my tank? Thank you 😊

The German blue ones

? Help please I am getting fish tomorrow! Thank you guys A LOT 😁

Sorry for the legate reply. Anyway, I would not get fairly fast fish, as they may not get enough food. They are not aggressive, in fact as long as the other species are not aggressive, you should be fine. Plug it into aqadvisor again.

I did and it said the only issue was temp but there was a very small difference. Fish can adapt to a lot different temps I think. Tetras are pretty fast too and when I feed them I watch and check to make sure every fish gets a few flakes. Thanks
Oh and with my stock list I have

5x penguin tetras
5x espei rasboras
2x female red wags
5x black skirts
5x yellow phantoms
2x German blue rams
5x silver hatchets
4x juli cories

I may have worded that wrong. Because of the fast fish, the German blue rams may not get enough food. You may have to watch the rams for a couple of days.

I am thinking about getting some Cory catfish, a couple of Kuhli Loaches, a small shoal of Harlequin Rasboras and a betta fish but I cannot find the answers to:

What to feed my community tank? I have bottom feeders too and I only want one food to give them all.

  • How much food should I give them?
  • How often should I feed them?

How to add a betta to a community tank

1 Answer 1

You’re going to have trouble finding a single food you can just drop in and everyone will have the opportunity to eat. This is not because all of the fish won’t eat the same food but because of their feeding habits.

Generally, Loaches and Catfish wish to feed towards the bottom of the aquarium and Betta and Harlequin will wish to feed at the top. This means that unless you have a food that can sit in the middle of the water (or a tablet stuck to the side of the tank) either option you pick won’t be ideal for one group of fish.

This is not to say that if you feed flakes the bottom feeders won’t get anything but it is a consideration. Bottom feeders will often be much more timid in their feeding habits.

Fish will thrive on a varied diet and the ability to feed them a wide range of foods means that you won’t have problems when you run out of a specific type of food because the fish won’t be that normalised to one food.

I have a mixture of top feeders, middle feeders and bottom feeders in a tropical community tank and I feed the following:

Bottom Feeders:

  • Algae wafers
  • Cucumber
  • Sinking Shrimp Pellets
  • Tropical sticking tabs (rarely)
  • Bloodworm (Very occasionally)

Middle / Top Feeders

  • Various flake foods (Alage based / standard trop flake)
  • Blanched leaves (lettuce/spinach/cucumber)
  • Brine Shrimp
  • Diced Scallops (occasionally)
  • Peas

The point is, your fish will grow much better and be much healthier if you provide a variety of different foods. If you really wanted to have minimum foods (which I wouldn’t advise) I would at least get two separate foods – one for the regular fish and another for the catfish and loaches.

If the issue is cost (which is understandable as a lot of fish food can be pricey) I would advise you to check out this video which details how to make a homemade food. You’ll probably want to puree the end product and think about quantity because your fish will have smaller mouths and stomachs.

I’m sure you’ve heard this before but it’s definitely worth repeating:

It’s better to underfeed your fish than overfeed them

This is due to a number of factors:

  • Water quality – If you overfeed and there is food lying around in your tank, the food will break down and you could face spikes in ammonia which will actively harm your fish.
  • Fish health – Generally a fish will eat all it can because it doesn’t know when the next meal is coming. A fish that is overweight is much more susceptible to health complications such as bloat, swim bladder etc.
  • Natural environment – If you try and mimic the real world, fish won’t regularly find food in the same quantities every day.

A hungry fish is a healthy fish. Most fish will be able to go a week or more without any food. A fish should always be excited to eat food in the tank. If they are apathetic (and there are no underlying health issues) you’ll probably want to feed less than you currently are. If they are extremely anxious to eat, you can feed a little more. I will give a tank of about 20 fish (of various sizes) a smallish pinch of flakes and something for the bottom feeders.

I regularly have a day where I feed nothing at all to mimic real world conditions.

I think that your tank has enough stocking already. 13 cories is a bit pushing your limits already (your 4 bronze).

Another reason this wouldn’t work is because danios are known to nip at your betta’s fins, whether male or female (what kind of danio do you have?) and bettas will eat your cherry shrimp. They see nothing but an expensive meal.

Willbacon23

Fish Crazy
  • May 14, 2020
  • #4

I think that your tank has enough stocking already. 13 cories is a bit pushing your limits already (your 4 bronze).

Another reason this wouldn’t work is because danios are known to nip at your betta’s fins, whether male or female (what kind of danio do you have?) and bettas will eat your cherry shrimp. They see nothing but an expensive meal.

trash.binh91

Fish Addict
  • May 14, 2020
  • #5

trash.binh91

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Salty&Onion

Fish Aficionado
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Willbacon23

Fish Crazy
  • May 14, 2020
  • #8

Salty&Onion

Fish Aficionado
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  • #9

trash.binh91

Fish Addict
  • May 14, 2020
  • #10

Irksome

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  • May 14, 2020
  • #11

trash.binh91

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  • #12

Salty&Onion

Fish Aficionado
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feminva

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  • May 14, 2020
  • #14

I have a betta in my community tank. I have had a 10 gallon tank for some 25 years. It has been mostly stable (occasional fish dies—then I suspect I have too many and accept the new balance) over the years. Currently I have 2 neons, a small pleco, 2panda cories, 3 kuhli loaches, 1female BETTA.

I added the following due to algae problem and recurring nuisance snail problem: 1 nerite snail, 1 assassin snail, 1red shrimp. I also added wood—was told plecos like to eat it but never see pleco on it, ½ almond leaf—I read it has many benefits; betta likes going under it.

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How to add a betta to a community tank

Adding Betta Fish to Community Tank

How to add a betta to a community tank
Betta fish (farthest left) swimming happily in the community setup

Generally what is agreed is that putting betta fish to a mixed species community aquarium should not pose any issue or unwanted problem provided that all the fish living in it are not those aggressive types that can harm each other. Most important, the whole tank space must not be too cramped or limited and lead to overcrowding. Although betta are known to be excellent specimen used in fighting fish competitions, but when they are added with other freshwater species, surprisingly they adapt quite well and will co-exist with their new tank mates without hurting them. Some of the fish species that I’ve seen living together with the betta are well-known community regulars like gourami, platy, bristlenose catfish (suckermouth) including also the timid types like the neon tetra or even rasbora, so long as they are all tropical specimens, sharing the same environmental needs and condition. In a well-planted setup, most of the time you will find them hiding among the plants and stay away from the attention of the other fish but once they get themselves acclimatized to their new aquarium home, betta fish will generally mix well with their friends and will even come out in the open.

However, this condition does not always hold true as there is one tricky aspect that you will come across if you decide to breed your betta fish in an open community tank. Usually under this condition, your pet will adopt a totally different personality which will bring out their aggressive natural behavior to establish their own territory so that they can build their nest to care for their young. Attention also needs to be given, if let’s say when you try to mix two or more male betta fish into the same community tank because in this scenario, they will also try to draw a borderline with a territory to call their own and encroachment to each other’ den naturally means provocation and will result in a fight. However, this statement is only holds 50% true because under different conditions, I’ve seen before two or more male betta that can coexist with each other and main reason, why this is possible is because the tank is large enough to accommodate all of them and allow the fish to live far away apart from each other. Anyway, if you decide to try out, make sure that you are willing to spend more time and put on more effort to place close observations, because in the end you cannot predict or expect what will happen. Also if you decide to breed your pets, it would be worthwhile to move them to another tank because definitely, adding a breeding pair to a community tank is not a good idea at all.

Sometimes despite all the precautions taken without any breeding activity taking place with only one solitary fish added to the community, things can still go horribly wrong when your betta fish start to turn aggressive especially towards their smaller tank mates. If this happens, the only thing left to do is to take them out or just in case you don’t have the luxury of having additional aquarium, you can just use a tank separator or divider instead. In this scenario, you might be wondering and kept asking yourself on what went wrong that can induce the betta fish to act aggressively even though it is not in the breeding mood. Although there is no general consensus on what leads to this provocative nature, the most logical explanation is that the fish you are adding has already been subjected to solitary confinement, teased, or have been induced and prepared for fighting. What this means is that the fish has been kept in small bottles living under harsh condition or forcefully put on closeup view facing their potential fighting partner. Thus when the same fish that has been exposed to this undesirable condition are put into community aquariums, they will exhibit the same aggressive behavior and will lead them to attack their tank mates. For those young betta fish raised from small fry to reach adulthood and spending most of their time with their siblings, this type of betta will end up generally friendlier and is rather unlikely that they will turn hostile or hurt their tank partner. Well I think that is about all on this topic and hopefully the bits and pieces of information here and there will help to equip yourself and be more prepared should you decide to go ahead and mix your betta to your community aquarium. All in all, always remember, if things don’t turn out the way you intended, just take them out and remove them to another aquarium.

Also, if you decide to inject more fun to your fishkeeping hobby, you might want to check out these articles on betta fish breeding and learn all about another betta fish cousin, the peaceful betta imbellis

i had 3 females in a community once. they were ok with the other fish, but the male killed them.

they can be as agressive yes, but it COULD work, males can live in a community so i cant see why females cant. just be prepared to act if it doesnt work

OldMan47

Livebearer fanatic
  • Dec 20, 2009
  • #4

OneOnion

Fishaholic
  • Dec 20, 2009
  • #5

OldMan47

Livebearer fanatic
  • Dec 20, 2009
  • #6

Haych

Fish Gatherer
  • Dec 20, 2009
  • #7

it all depends on what you want to do.

i cant 100% give advice on females as thats a new one on me, and am working towards it myself.

if you go for a community tank, add the male betta LAST. he WILL be aggressive if he is put in first.

i have neons, minnows, harlequins, guppies, endlers, cories and plecs in with my betta and there is no issues AT ALL between any of them.

hihi100202

Fishaholic
  • Dec 20, 2009
  • #8

Assaye

Fish Gatherer
  • Dec 20, 2009
  • #9

Haych

Fish Gatherer
  • Dec 20, 2009
  • #10

yep, all together, sometimes the male guppies fight but thats over the females

i have ALWAYS had male bettas with my community and only had issues ONCE as i put him in first, so he had made it his terratory

OneOnion

Fishaholic
  • Dec 20, 2009
  • #11

it all depends on what you want to do.

i cant 100% give advice on females as thats a new one on me, and am working towards it myself.

if you go for a community tank, add the male betta LAST. he WILL be aggressive if he is put in first.

i have neons, minnows, harlequins, guppies, endlers, cories and plecs in with my betta and there is no issues AT ALL between any of them.

Cool. Actually, I was thinking of having a female betta in the community tank. But I’ll still be sure to add her last. Anyway, I’ve decided to do the 1 betta in community tank thing instead of the 6 bettas. Here’s a stocking list I’ve come up with:

10 gallon
1 female betta(a nice double tail, probably)
3 platies(Heard they do o.k. with bettas)
6 harlquin rasbora (thanks for suggestion, Haych)

If anyone has any objections or suggestions to make the stocking better, please say so.

Also, will 3 male platies be ok together, or do I have to do 1 male 2 female? I don’t want to deal with a billion fry swimming around x__x

How to add a betta to a community tank

Siamese fighting fish (aka Betta fish) are known to lead a solitary and territorial life in the wild and are quite aggressive. Their natural behaviour is why many fishkeepers choose to keep fighting fish alone in a nano aquarium. But, if you would like to keep more of a variety of fish, Siamese fighters can certainly coexist with various other species in a community tank without problems. Before adding betta fish to your tropical fish tank (or other tropical fish to your betta tank), there are a just few things you should consider:

First, ensure that your tank set-up is large enough. Bigger tanks are always better – keep in mind this species’ territorial nature.

  • If you have a single betta in a tank that is 10 litres or less, do not add any other fish to this aquarium. It is generally easier to add Siamese fighting fish to a community tank than to add other fish to your betta’s territory.

There should be enough live aquarium plants or (artificial aquarium plants) for your betta to be able to take shelter and hide.

If you already have tropical fish species that are known to be fin-nippers, it is best to avoid adding a betta to the tank. Despite the fighting fish’s aggressive reputation, they are often a target of bullying because of their flowy fins. The long fins will be nipped at and cause the fish injury.

Avoid keeping Siamese fighting fish with other species with vibrant colours or long flowy fins, like guppies, they can be mistaken as another male betta.

Here are some specific examples of tankmates to avoid and which tankmates have the best probability of getting along well with a betta fish: