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How to act according to furu al deen 10 branches of islam

The word “shari‘a” literally means “a way.” In Islamic terminology, it means the legal system of Islam. It is normally translated as the laws of Islam or the Islamic laws.

Islam is a din—religion. The word din bears a concept wider and more comprehensive than the word `religion’. It means believing in the fundamentals as well as living according to the Islamic laws. This concept of religion is beautifully conveyed in the terms used by Islamic scholars to describe the fundamental beliefs and the practical laws of Islam. The “beliefs” are described as “usûlu ’d-dín — the roots of religion”. The “sharí‘a laws” are described as “furû‘u ’d-dín — the branches of religion”. Beliefs without practice is incomplete Islam; and practice without belief may be useful in this world but not of much use in the hereafter.

The sharí‘a is a complete way of life; no aspect of human life is outside its domain. Islam expects a Muslim to follow its laws in every aspect of life: personal and familial, religious and social, moral and political, economic and business, etc. After all, “Muslim” means one who submits to God. The Qur’ân says, “When Allah and His Messenger have decreed a matter, it is not for any believing man or believing woman to have a choice in their affairs. And whosoever disobeys Allâh and His Messenger has gone astray into clear error.” (33:36)

2. The Need for the Sharí‘a

Man’s nature dictates that he can only function properly within a society. Human beings are interdependent by nature. This interdependency of human beings on each other is beautifully expressed in the following passage:

“The baker told me to bake my own bread; the tailor told me to cut and sew my own clothes; the shoemaker told me to make my own shoes; similarly, the carpenter, the engineer, the farmer, and all the labourers and workers told me to do everything by myself. It was then that I looked at myself and realized that I am naked, hungry and powerless with no shelter over my head, waiting for death to overcome me. It was then that I realized that I cannot survive without my fellow human beings; my survival depends on living in the society.”*

A society, however, depends for its existence on laws and regulations. If there are no laws in a society, it is overtaken by the law of the jungle: the struggle for existence and the survival of the fittest. So the need for laws to regulate the lives of human beings is beyond any doubt.

Islam teaches that because of the imperative need of laws for a civilized society, God has sent a series of messengers and prophets with divine laws for man’s guidance from the very first day of his creation. The last Messenger was Prophet Muhammad (may peace and blessings of God be upon him and his family) who brought the final and the perfect set of laws, Islam, as a guide for mankind till the end of time.

Many people think that there is no need for God-made laws, we can make laws by ourselves. Islam believes that a human being is a very sophisticated creature; and since he has not made his own body, nor did he create the world in which he lives, he, therefore, is not the best candidate for making laws about himself. Common sense says that when you buy a complicated piece of equipment, like a computer, you should use it according to the ‘instruction manual’ prepared by the manufacturer of that particular machine. To learn the computer by trial and error is not the smart way. Similarly, God as the Creator of man and the earth knows better how the human being should live.

The ‘instruction manual’ that God sent for us is known as the Qur’ân. But the human being is not just any ordinary machine; rather he is more complicated than the most advanced computer a human can ever produce. So God did not only send the Qur’ân—He also sent an instructor known as Prophet Muhammad. The Prophet of Islam brought the Qur’ân to us and also provided practical examples in how to conduct our lives. According to Shi‘a Islam, after the Prophet, the Imams of Ahlu ‘l-bayt are the protectors of the Qur’ân and the interpreters of its laws.

3. The Superiority of God-made Laws over Man-made Laws

At this point, I would like to show the superiority of Islamic laws over man-made laws. Man-made laws are by necessity influenced by the law-makers’ social and racial biases. The United Nations Organization is the best example of how policies are enforced only when it suits the interest of the super-powers. The rule of the game in man-made laws is not honesty and justice, it is “the might is right”.

God-made laws are superior because of the following facts:

God is above class status;

God is above racial prejudice;

God is above gender rivalry;

God, as the Creator, fully knows humans as well as the world in which they live.

God-made laws will be just and based on fully informed decisions. Let me demonstrate the superiority of God-made laws by using the example of capital punishment.

The secular system always swings according to the mood of the people: sometimes, the people feel that capital punishment for murder is not right and so they pressure their representatives to vote against capital punishment. But when crimes rates increase and serial murder cases occur more frequently, public opinion changes and the legislators are influenced in favour of capital punishment.

Actually both sides of this issue reflect the Judeo-Christian basis of the Western society. Judaism, on the one hand, insists on the principle of justice which demands “an eye for an eye”. On the other hand, Christianity promotes the principle of mercy by saying “turn thy other cheek.”

Islam, the final version of God-made laws, takes a balanced look at the issue of capital punishment and has beautifully accommodated both the principles of justice and mercy in its system. The Western system did not realize the difference between the two principles of justice and mercy: while justice can be demanded and legislated, mercy cannot be forced or made into a law. You can always plead for mercy but you can never demand mercy.

Islam takes this difference into full consideration, and, therefore, it talks about capital punishment on two different levels: legal and moral. On the legal level, it sanctions the principle of justice by giving the right of retaliation to the victim. But, immediately, the Qur’ân moves on to the moral level and strongly recommends the victim to forgo his right of retaliation and either to forgive the criminal or to settle for monetary compensation. This issue has been clearly mentioned in the following verse of the Qur’ân:

In it (the Torah), We wrote to them: “A life for a life, an eye for an eye, a nose for a nose, an ear for an ear, a tooth for a tooth, and there is retaliation for wounds.” But (before you act according to your right, remember that) whosoever forgoes (his right of retaliation), it shall be expiation for him (against his own sins). 5:45

Thus Islam has very beautifully provided the legal safeguard for human life on the social level and also encouraged mercy from a moral point of view on the individual level. If human beings are left on their own in this issue, they will always swing between the two extremes of justice and mercy—only Islam, the final version of God-made legal system can accommodate both these principles.

We are human beings and to err is human. Although we pray prayer with full care and attention yet sometimes we err. Rather even when we do not err on some occasions we do begin to doubt about the performance of a particular part of the prayer. And there is every likelihood that we might have erred. Now when anybody doubts about certain performance of prayer, he should ponder for a moment to shake of his doubt but if he fails to satisfy himself then he should act according to the prescribed rules.

There are 23 cases of doubt that may arise during prayer. The laws of Shari’ah are distinct for each one of these.

Doubts to be ignored

Six cases of doubts are such that these can be ignored. Prayer does not become invalid in the event of these doubts.

1. Doubts after having finished the prayer.
2. Doubt after passing of the event. For example while in sajdah, to doubt having missed ruku’.
3. Doubt after the time has passed. For example, doubt at the time of Maghrib whether the ‘Asr prayer was offered or not.
4. People having doubtful natures. Such persons doubt about everything. So they can be doubtful about prayer also. They must ignore their doubts.
5. Doubt either by an Imam (one who leads the prayer) or a ma’mum (the follower of the Imam in prayer). In this case the Imam may be sure of his performance but the ma’mum is doubtful or vice versa. In such case whoever is in doubt will follow the one who is sure.
6. Doubt during a sunnat (non-obligatory) prayer, or in Salat al-ihtiyat.

Al-Wājib (Arabic: الوااجب ) is an Islamic jurisprudential term referring to an act that must be performed and if abandoned, it will lead to Divine wrath and punishment. There are several categorizations for Wajib. The most important obligatory acts in Islam are known as Furu’ al-Din, the most famous of which are ten.

Contents

Terminology

Literally, Wājib means essential or necessary. Technically, it is an act that must be performed, and abandoning it is a sin and causes Divine punishment. [1]

Types

Al-Wājib al-Ta’yini and al-Takhyiri

  • Al-Wājib al-Taʿyīnī ( الواجب التعيني ) (without choice) is an obligatory act that has no substitute, such as daily Prayers.
  • Al-Wājib al-Takhyīri ( الواجب التخيري ) (with choice) is an obligatory act that has one or more substitute and one is free to choose between them, [2] for example, according to the fatwa of some jurists, one can choose between Zuhr Prayer and Friday Prayer on Friday.

Al-Wajib al-Ayni and al-Kifa’i

  • Al-Wājib al-ʿAyni ( الواجب العيني ) (individual) is an obligatory act that every individual Muslim must perform, such as Salat (Prayer)
  • Al-Wājib al-Kifa’i ( الواجب الکفائي ) (collective) is an obligatory act that if some Muslims perform it, that will suffice for others. They are no longer held responsible for performing it, such Ghusl of the Dead and burying a dead.

Al-Wajib al-Muwaqqat and Ghayr al-Muwaqqat

  • Al-Wājib al-Muwaqqat ( الواجب الموقت ) (with timing) is an obligatory act that must be done in a specific time such as Salat and Sawm (fasting)
  • Al-Wājib Ghayr al-Muwaqqat ( الواجب الغيرالموقت ) (without timing) is an obligatory act that has no specific time such as being honest.

Al-Wajib al-Muwassa’ and al-Mudayyaq

  • Al-Wājib al-Muwassaʿ ( الواجب الموسع ) is a kind of al-Wājib al-Muwaqqat. It is an obligatory act for which a specific period of time has been allocated, which is more than enough to perform it such as daily Prayers.
  • Al-Wājib al-Muḍayyaq ( الواجب المضيّق ) is also a kind of al-Wājib al- Muwaqqat. It is an obligatory act for which a specific period of time has been allocated, which is equal to the time needed to perform it, such as fasting.

Al-Wajib al-Ta’abbud’ and al-Tawassuli

  • Al-Wājib al-Taʿabbudi ( الواجب التعبدي ) (devotional) is an obligatory act that must be done to gain proximity to God. [3]
  • Al-Wājib al-Tawassulī ( الواجب التوصلي ) (non-devotional) is an obligatory act that does not require an intention of gaining proximity to God, such as washing Najis (ritually impure) clothes for performing Prayer.

Al-Wājib al-Nafsī and al-Ghayrī

  • Al-Wājib al-Nafsi ( الواجب النفسي ) (due to itself) is an obligatory act that is obligatory due to itself and not as a prerequisite of another obligatory act.
  • Al-Wājib al-Ghayrī ( الواجب الغيري ) (due to something else) is an obligatory act that is obligatory as a prerequisite of another obligatory act, such as Wudu that is wājib for performing Salat. [4]

Famous Wajibs

Furuʿ al-Dīn

The most important practical rulings of Islam are known as Furu’ al-Din (branches/ancillaries of religion), which is according to majority of Faqihs consists of 10 famous acts of worship:

    (Prayer) (Fast) (Pilgrimage) (Alms) (Struggle) (Enjoining good) (Forbidding evil)

It seems that enumerating these ten acts of worship is because of their importance in the Qur’anic verses and hadiths, as according to the aforementioned categorization obligatory acts are not confined to these ten cases. There are other rulings on various topics such as transactions, marriage, retaliation, judgment, … that are obligatory.

Some topics of Furu’ al-Din are related to the relation between humankind and God and the duties, rulings, and laws of human beings in this regard, such as Salat, Sawm, and Hajj. There are other topics related to one’s duties towards other humans and regulate human relations, such as Jihad, Zakat, and Khums. [5]

The word “shari‘a” literally means “a way.” In Islamic terminology, it means the legal system of Islam. It is normally translated as the laws of Islam or the Islamic laws.

Islam is a din—religion. The word din bears a concept wider and more comprehensive than the word `religion’. It means believing in the fundamentals as well as living according to the Islamic laws. This concept of religion is beautifully conveyed in the terms used by Islamic scholars to describe the fundamental beliefs and the practical laws of Islam. The “beliefs” are described as “usûlu ’d-dín — the roots of religion”. The “sharí‘a laws” are described as “furû‘u ’d-dín — the branches of religion”. Beliefs without practice is incomplete Islam; and practice without belief may be useful in this world but not of much use in the hereafter.

The sharí‘a is a complete way of life; no aspect of human life is outside its domain. Islam expects a Muslim to follow its laws in every aspect of life: personal and familial, religious and social, moral and political, economic and business, etc. After all, “Muslim” means one who submits to God. The Qur’ân says, “When Allah and His Messenger have decreed a matter, it is not for any believing man or believing woman to have a choice in their affairs. And whosoever disobeys Allâh and His Messenger has gone astray into clear error.” (33:36)

2. The Need for the Sharí‘a

Man’s nature dictates that he can only function properly within a society. Human beings are interdependent by nature. This interdependency of human beings on each other is beautifully expressed in the following passage:

“The baker told me to bake my own bread; the tailor told me to cut and sew my own clothes; the shoemaker told me to make my own shoes; similarly, the carpenter, the engineer, the farmer, and all the labourers and workers told me to do everything by myself. It was then that I looked at myself and realized that I am naked, hungry and powerless with no shelter over my head, waiting for death to overcome me. It was then that I realized that I cannot survive without my fellow human beings; my survival depends on living in the society.”*

A society, however, depends for its existence on laws and regulations. If there are no laws in a society, it is overtaken by the law of the jungle: the struggle for existence and the survival of the fittest. So the need for laws to regulate the lives of human beings is beyond any doubt.

Islam teaches that because of the imperative need of laws for a civilized society, God has sent a series of messengers and prophets with divine laws for man’s guidance from the very first day of his creation. The last Messenger was Prophet Muhammad (may peace and blessings of God be upon him and his family) who brought the final and the perfect set of laws, Islam, as a guide for mankind till the end of time.

Many people think that there is no need for God-made laws, we can make laws by ourselves. Islam believes that a human being is a very sophisticated creature; and since he has not made his own body, nor did he create the world in which he lives, he, therefore, is not the best candidate for making laws about himself. Common sense says that when you buy a complicated piece of equipment, like a computer, you should use it according to the ‘instruction manual’ prepared by the manufacturer of that particular machine. To learn the computer by trial and error is not the smart way. Similarly, God as the Creator of man and the earth knows better how the human being should live.

The ‘instruction manual’ that God sent for us is known as the Qur’ân. But the human being is not just any ordinary machine; rather he is more complicated than the most advanced computer a human can ever produce. So God did not only send the Qur’ân—He also sent an instructor known as Prophet Muhammad. The Prophet of Islam brought the Qur’ân to us and also provided practical examples in how to conduct our lives. According to Shi‘a Islam, after the Prophet, the Imams of Ahlu ‘l-bayt are the protectors of the Qur’ân and the interpreters of its laws.

3. The Superiority of God-made Laws over Man-made Laws

At this point, I would like to show the superiority of Islamic laws over man-made laws. Man-made laws are by necessity influenced by the law-makers’ social and racial biases. The United Nations Organization is the best example of how policies are enforced only when it suits the interest of the super-powers. The rule of the game in man-made laws is not honesty and justice, it is “the might is right”.

God-made laws are superior because of the following facts:

God is above class status;

God is above racial prejudice;

God is above gender rivalry;

God, as the Creator, fully knows humans as well as the world in which they live.

God-made laws will be just and based on fully informed decisions. Let me demonstrate the superiority of God-made laws by using the example of capital punishment.

The secular system always swings according to the mood of the people: sometimes, the people feel that capital punishment for murder is not right and so they pressure their representatives to vote against capital punishment. But when crimes rates increase and serial murder cases occur more frequently, public opinion changes and the legislators are influenced in favour of capital punishment.

Actually both sides of this issue reflect the Judeo-Christian basis of the Western society. Judaism, on the one hand, insists on the principle of justice which demands “an eye for an eye”. On the other hand, Christianity promotes the principle of mercy by saying “turn thy other cheek.”

Islam, the final version of God-made laws, takes a balanced look at the issue of capital punishment and has beautifully accommodated both the principles of justice and mercy in its system. The Western system did not realize the difference between the two principles of justice and mercy: while justice can be demanded and legislated, mercy cannot be forced or made into a law. You can always plead for mercy but you can never demand mercy.

Islam takes this difference into full consideration, and, therefore, it talks about capital punishment on two different levels: legal and moral. On the legal level, it sanctions the principle of justice by giving the right of retaliation to the victim. But, immediately, the Qur’ân moves on to the moral level and strongly recommends the victim to forgo his right of retaliation and either to forgive the criminal or to settle for monetary compensation. This issue has been clearly mentioned in the following verse of the Qur’ân:

In it (the Torah), We wrote to them: “A life for a life, an eye for an eye, a nose for a nose, an ear for an ear, a tooth for a tooth, and there is retaliation for wounds.” But (before you act according to your right, remember that) whosoever forgoes (his right of retaliation), it shall be expiation for him (against his own sins). 5:45

Thus Islam has very beautifully provided the legal safeguard for human life on the social level and also encouraged mercy from a moral point of view on the individual level. If human beings are left on their own in this issue, they will always swing between the two extremes of justice and mercy—only Islam, the final version of God-made legal system can accommodate both these principles.

How to act according to furu al deen 10 branches of islam

Simply scrape off bark from the tip (1/2″), then chew the tip gently until brush like and the fiber becomes soft. Brush teeth horizontally and frequently.

Chew the bristles to separate the natural fibers to form like toothbrush bristles. To clean the teeth, brush with Miswak from the edge of the gums in a up and down movements till the cutting edge of the teeth.When the bristles are worn and the flavor has subsided, cut them off & repeat instruction.

Hadith on Excellence of Using Miswak

  1. Hadhrat Abu Hurraira narrates that Rasulallah said: ‘Was it not for my fear of imposing a difficulty on my Ummah I would have ordered that the Miswaak be used for every Salah, and delay in Isha prayer ‘.” (Bukhari)
  2. Hadhrat Ibn Umar narrates that the Messenger of Allah said: ‘Make a
    regular practice of the Miswaak, for verily, it is healthy for the mouth and it is a Pleasure for the Creator (i.e. Allah is pleased with the Muslim who uses the Miswaak)’.” (Bukhari)
  3. Hadhrat A’isha narrates that Rasulallah said: The reward of Salah (Prayers) is multiplied 70 times if Miswaak was used before it. Other narrations mention ninety-nine fold up to four hundred fold reward. The Ulama explain that the difference in reward is in accordance with the Ikhlaas – sincerity of the person. The more the sincerity, the more the reward on will gain and this applies to ANY good act for the pleasure of Allah.
  4. Hadhrat Ayesha narrates from Rasulallah : “Two Rak’ahs of Salah after using the Miswaak is more beloved unto me than seventy Rak’ahs without Miswaak.” (As Sunanul Kubraa)
  5. Miswaak is to be held in the right hand According to ‘Abd Allah Ibn Mas’ud the Miswaak should be held in the right hand so that the small finger is below the Miswaak and the thumb is below the tip and the other fingers are on top of the Miswaak. It should not be held in the fist. (Rahdul Mukhtar)

Benefits of Miswak

1. Miswak strengthens the gums and prevents tooth decay.
2. Miswak assists in eliminating toothaches and prevents further increase of decay which has already set in.
3. Miswak creates a fragrance in the mouth.
4. Miswak is a cure for illness.
5. Miswak eliminates bad odors and improves the sense of taste.
6. Miswak sharpens the memory.
7. Miswak is a cure for headaches.
8. Miswak creates lustre (noor) on the face of the one who continually uses it.
9. Miswak causes the teeth to glow.
10. Miswak strengthens the eyesight.
11. Miswak assists in digestion.
12. Miswak clears the voice.
13. The greatest benefit of using Miswak is gaining the pleasure of Allah.
14. The reward of Salaah (Prayers) is multiplied 70 times if Miswak was used before it.

Aadaab (Etiquette) of Miswaak

(1) The Miswaak should be a straight twig, devoid of roughness.
(2) The Miswaak should be clean.
(3) The Miswaak should not be too hard nor too soft.
(4) The Miswaak should not be used while one is lying down.
(5) The new Miswaak should be approximately 8 inches (a hand-span) in length.
(6) The Miswaak should be the thickness of the forefinger.
(7) Before using the Miswaak, it should be washed.
(8) After use it should be washed as well.
(9) The Miswaak should not be sucked.
(10) The Miswaak should be placed vertically when not in use. It should not be thrown onto the ground.
(11) If the Miswaak is dry it should be moistened with water prior to use. This is Musthahab. It is preferable to moisten it with Rose water.
(12) The Miswaak should not be used in the toilet.
(13) The Miswaak should be used at least thrice (brush three times) for each section of the mouth, e.g. brush the upper layer of teeth thrice, then the lower layer thrice, etc.
(14) The Miswaak should not be used at both ends.
(15) The Miswaak should not be taken from an unknown tree as it may be poisonous.

Sunnah for using Miswaak:

  1. For the recitation of the Holy Qur’an.
  2. For the recitation of Hadith.
  3. When the mouth emits bad odour.
  4. For teaching or learning the virtues of Islam.
  5. For making remembrance of Allah (The Exalted).
  6. Before intercourse.
  7. After entering one’s home.
  8. Before entering any good gathering.
  9. When experiencing pangs of hunger or thirst.
  10. After the time of Suhoor.
  11. Before meals.
  12. Before and after a journey.
  13. Before sleeping.

Best Miswak

The scholars are agreed that the best thing for cleaning the mouth is the twigs of the araak tree, because of its good smell, and because it has brush-like fibres which are effective for cleaning food particles etc. from between the teeth, and because of the hadeeth of Abd-Allaah ibn Masood (may Allaah be pleased with him) who said: I used to gather siwaak sticks from the araak tree for the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).(Reported by Ahmad, 3991

A miswak should be one hand span in length when selected. If it becomes dry, it should be soaked in any water to soften the end bristles. The end should be cut afresh to ensure hygiene and should never be stored near a toilet or sink. The brush may be created by cutting Salvadora persica’s branches

Where can you find Miswak?

The miswak twig can be extracted from many trees except for those that are poisonous or harmful, such as pomegranate tree and the myrtle tree.
But it’s preferred to get miswak from bitter tree branches as Palm trees, olive trees or the roots and branches of desert trees preferably from Arak trees, Arabic for Salvadora persica.

If Miswak These days Miswak Comes vacuum sealed to retain freshness and softness. Here are Few Amazon links to buy Miswak :

The Prodigy of Creation

About the Book

Episodes’ is a commentary of the poem ‘The Prodigy of Creation’, which briefly guides the reader through selected episodes from the blessed Seerah: from pre-Islamic events of the ‘Days of Ignorance’ to the last day of the Prophet’s (May peace and blessings be upon him) life.

The work attempts to draw the reader’s attention to the sacred personality of Muhammad (May peace and blessings be upon him) and his humanising biography, encouraging the reader to follow the path of Allah’s Most Beloved (May peace and blessings be upon him).

The book is currently stocked at ZamZam (Green Street), Jamia Siraj al Uloom (Leyton), Islamic Establishment (Leicester), Madina Bookshop (Green Street), Nakhla (Queens Road, Azhar Academy (Little Ilford Lane)

Miftahul Jannah Website

Friday, 31 October 2008

The Branches of Imaan

Recently I heard a statement I found very funny, “Do you think money grows on trees?” I suddenly remembered a time in my childhood when I asked my beloved mother for something extremely expensive to which she replied, “Do you think money grows on trees?!” I became extremely upset and set out to prove her wrong and so I waited for a sunny day and proceeded into my garden with my green plastic shovel that I got from Blackpool beach and a bag full of pennies. I spent many days watering them hoping that a tree would sprout out. I had envisaged myself jumping up and down underneath a tree that would have £50 under each branch. These memories made me think and Allah opened my eyes to the fact there is a tree which has an entity that is more valuable than money. The tree of Islam which consists of 77 Branches of Imaan. Hazrat Hakeemul Ummat (Allah have mercy upon him) mentions them in his Kitaab ‘Furu’ ul Imaan’:

The Messenger of Allah (May peace and blessings be upon him) said “There are over 70 branches of faith. The highest is to bear witness that ‘There is no god but Allah and Muhammad is the Messenger of Allah’. The lowest is the removal of harm from the road. Modesty is also of faith.” We will therefore mentions these qualities.

1. Belief in Allah

2. To believe that everything other than Allah was non-existent. Thereafter, Allah Ta’ala created these things and subsequently they came into existence.

3. To believe in the existence of the Angels.

4. To believe that all the divine books that were sent to the different prophets are true. However, apart from the Qur’an, all other books are not valid anymore.

5. To believe that all the prophets are true. However, we are commanded to follow the Prophet Muhammad (May peace and blessings be upon him) alone.

6. To believe that Allah Ta’ala as knowledge of everything from before hand and that only that which He sanctions or wishes will occur.

7. To believe that the Resurrection will definitely occur.

8. To believe in the existence of Heaven.

9. To believe in the existence of Hell.

10. To have love for Allah Ta’ala.

11. To have love for the Messenger of Allah (May Allah peace and blessings be upon him)

12. To love or hate someone solely because of Allah.

13. To execute all actions with the intention of religion alone.

14. To regret and express remorse when a sin is committed.

15. To fear Allah Ta’ala.

16. To hope for the mercy of Allah Ta’ala

17. To be modest.

18.To express gratitude over a bounty or favour.

19. To fulfill promises.

20. To exercise patience.

21. To consider yourself lower than others.

22. To have mercy on the creation.

23. To be pleased with whatever you experience from Allah Ta’ala.

24. To place your trust in Allah Ta’ala.

25. Not to boast or brag over any quality that you posses.

26. Not to have malice or hatred towards anybody.

27. Not to be envious of anyone.

28. Not to become angry.

29. Not to wish harm for anyone.

30. Not to have love for the world.

31. To recite the testimony of faith (kalimah) with the tongue.

32. To recite the Qur’an.

33. To acquire knowledge.

34. To pass on Knowledge.

35. To make dua’a.

36. To make the zikr of Allah Ta’ala.

37. To abstain from the following: lies, backbiting, vulgar words, cursing, singing that is contrary
to the Shariah.

38. To make wudhu, ghusl, and keep one’s clothing clean.

39. To be steadfast in offering salaat.

40. To pay zakaat and sadaqatul fitr.

42. To perform Hajj.

43. To make i’tikaaf.

44. To move away or migrate from that place which is harmful for one’s deen.

45. To fulfill the vows that have been made to Allah.

46. To fulfill the oaths that are not sinful.

47. To pay the kaffarah for unfulfilled oaths.

48. To cover those parts of the body that are compulsory to cover.

49. To perform the ritual slaughter.

50. To enshroud and bury the deceased.

51. To fulfill your debts.

52. To abstain from prohibited things when undertaking monetary transactions.

53. Not to conceal something true which you may have witnessed.

54. To get married when the nafs desires to do so.

55. To fulfill the rights of those who are under you.

56. To provide comfort to one’s parents.

57. To rear children in the proper manner.

58. Not to sever relations with one’s friends and relatives.

59. To obey one’s master.

61. Not to initiate any way that is contrary to that of the generality of the Muslims.

62. To obey the ruler, provided what he orders is not contrary to the Shariah.

63. To make peace between two warring groups or individuals.

64. To assist in noble tasks.

65. To command the good and prohibit the evil.

66. If it is the government. it should mete out punishments according to the Shariah.

67. To fight the enemies of deen whenever such an occasion presents itself.

68. To fulfill one’s trusts.

69. To give loans to those who are in need .

70. To see to the needs of one’s neighbour.

71. To ensure that one’s income is pure.

72. To spend according to the Shariah.

73. To reply to one who has greeted you.

74. To say ‘Yarhamukallah’ (May Allah have mercy upon you) when anyone says ‘Alhamdulillah’ (All praise be to Allah) after sneezing.

75. Not to cause harm to anyone unjustly.

76. To abstain from games and amusements contrary to the Shariah.

77. To remove pebbles, stones, thorns, sticks, and the like from the road.

May Allah Ta’ala give us the ability to grow this tree in our lives and may He pour enough Guidance over it for it to blossom. May the contents of these 77 branches drop into our lives with great impact. Ameen

This website is about Islam and Spirituality. As such, the blogs and literature will cover these areas.

How to act according to furu al deen 10 branches of islam

The following 77 Branches of Faith is a collection compiled by Imam Al-Bayhaqi (r.a) in his work Shu`ab al-Iman.

Reported by Abu Hurairah (r.a): Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) said, “Iman(faith) has sixty odd or seventy odd branches. The uppermost of all these is the Testimony of Faith: La ilaha illallah’ (there is no true god except Allah) while the least of them is the removal of harmful object from the road. And shyness is a branch of Iman.” [Appears in Bukhari and Muslim]

THIRTY QUALITIES ARE CONNECTED TO THE HEART:

1. Belief in ALLAH (Testimony of Faith: La ilaha illallah’ (there is no true god except Allah)
2. To believe that everything other than ALLAH was non-existent. Thereafter, ALLAH
Ta’ala created these things and subsequently they came into existence.
3. To believe in the existence of angels (Malaaikah).
4. To believe that all the heavenly books (Kutub) that were sent to the different prophets are true. However, apart from the Quran, all other books are not valid anymore.
5. To believe that all the prophets are true. However, we are commanded to follow Muhammad
(peace and blessings be upon him) alone.
6. To believe that ALLAH Ta’ala has knowledge of everything from before-hand and that only that which He sanctions or wishes will occur.
7. To believe that Qiyaamah (day of Resurrection) will definitely occur.
8. To believe in the existence of Jannah (Paradise).
9. To believe in the existence of Jahannam (Hellfire).
10. To have love for ALLAH Ta’ala.
11. To have love for Rasulullah (peace and blessings be upon him)
12. To love or hate someone solely because of ALLAH
13. To execute all actions with the intention of deen(sincerity to Allah ) alone.
14. To regret and express remorse when a sin is committed.
15. To fear ALLAH Ta’ala.
16. To hope for the mercy of ALLAH Ta’ala.
17. To be modest.
18. To express gratitude over a bounty or favour.
19. To fulfill promises.
20. To exercise patience (Sabr).
21. To consider yourself lower than others.
22. To have mercy on the creation.
23. To be pleased with whatever you experience (decree) from ALLAH Ta’ala.
24. To place your trust in ALLAH Ta’ala.
25. Not to boast or brag over any quality that you posses.
26. Not to have malice or hatred towards anybody.
27. Not to be envious of anyone.
28. Not to become angry.
29. Not to wish harm for anyone.
30. Not to have love for the world.

SEVEN QUALITIES ARE CONNECTED TO THE TONGUE

31. To recite the Kalimah with the tongue.
32. To recite the Quran.
33. To acquire knowledge.
34. To pass on Knowledge.
35. To make dua.
36. To make the zikr of ALLAH Ta’ala.
37. To abstain from the following: lies, gheebah, vulgar words, cursing, singing(indecent) that is contrary to the Shariah.

FORTY QUALITIES ARE CONNECTED TO THE ENTIRE BODY

38. To make wudhu, ghusl, and keep one’s clothing clean.
39. To be steadfast in offering Salaat.
40. To pay zakaat and sadaqatul fitr.
41. To fast.
42. To perform the Hajj.
43. To make i’tikaaf.
44. To move away or migrate from that place which is harmful for one’s deen(religion).
45. To fulfill the vows that have been made to ALLAH
46. To fulfill the oaths that are not sinful.
47. To pay the kaffarah for unfulfilled oaths.
48. To cover those of the body that are fard to cover.
49. To make qurbaani(sacrifice for Allah).
50. To enshroud and bury the deceased.
51. To fulfill your debts.
52. To abstain from prohibited things when undertaking monetary transactions.
53. Not to conceal something true which you may have witnessed.
54. To get married when the Nafs desires to do so.
55. To fulfill the rights of those who are under you.
56. To provide comfort to one’s parents.
57. To rear children in the proper manner.
58. Not to sever relations with one’s friends and relatives.
59. To obey one’s master.
60. To be just.
61. Not to initiate any way that is contrary to that of the generality of the Muslims.
62. To obey the ruler, provided what he orders, is not contrary to the Shariah.
63. To make peace between two warring groups or individuals.
64. To assist in noble tasks.
65. To command the good and prohibit the evil (An Nahyi ‘Anil Munkar).
66. If it is the government, it should mete out punishments according to the Shariah.
67. To strive against the enemies of deen (if possible by hand if not by tongue(pen) if not by heart) whenever such an occasion presents itself.
68. To fulfill one’s trusts (amaanah).
69. To give loans to those who are in need.
70. To see to the needs of one’s neighbour.
71. To ensure that one’s income is pure.
72. To spend according to the Shariah.
73. To reply to one who has greeted you.
74. To say Yarhamukallah when anyone say Alhamdulillah after sneezing.
75. Not to cause harm to anyone unjustly.
76. To abstain from games and amusements that are contrary to the Shariah.
77. To remove pebbles, stones, thorns, stick etc. from the road.

May God bless Prophet Muhammad, his Progeny and his close Companions and may God give them abundant peace for eternity.

[B#5002 6I1 HB 82pp Dar Ibn Hazm, Abridged by Abul Ma’ali Umar Qazwini, Branches of Faith]

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How to act according to furu al deen 10 branches of islam How to act according to furu al deen 10 branches of islam How to act according to furu al deen 10 branches of islam

Mukhtasar Shu'ab Al-Iman lil- Bayhaqi
(Arabic Book)
By Imam Ahmed al-Bayhaqi
Abridged By Abul Ma'ali Umar bin bdur Rahman al-Qazwini
Hardback 82 Pages
Publisher : Dar Ibn Hazm

About The Book

This book is about the branches of faith (Shu'ab Al-Iman) Imam Bayhaqi mentioned that Iman’ refers to faith, belief, creed and doctrine in religious terminology. It has numerous branches or parts to it and these are known as ‘Shu’b al Iman’ (Branches of Faith). The Hadiths of beloved RasulAllah (Sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) mention numerous such branches, and accordingly, Iman has more than 70 branches.

These branches act as a scale to judge one’s status in Islam both in terms of Aqayid (Beliefs & Doctrines) and A’maal (Practices), the more one adheres to and complies with these parts of Iman, the higher the status one attains in the sight of Allah almighty and the beloved RasulAllah (Sallallahu alayhi wa sallam).

In brief, complete Iman consists of three major components and is reflected through them:

‘Iman bil Qalb’ (Testimony by Heart of all the Essentials of Iman): It refers to the states of one’s ‘Qalb’ (Heart) including the ‘Niyyah’ (Intentions), ‘Aqayid’ (Doctrines), and other deeds of the heart. This entirely depends upon a person’s ‘Batin’ (Hidden) states.

‘Iman bil Lisan’ (Testimony by Tongue of all the essentials of Iman): It refers to the confirmation of all the essentials of Islam and adhering to them through one’s ‘Lisan’ (Tongue). In other words it is ‘Zahir’ (Apparent) in one’s life , reflects the state of one’s heart and generates through the tongue.

‘Iman bil A’maal’ (Testimony by Actions of all the essentials of Iman): It refers to one’s ‘A’maal’ (Deeds) and is also ‘Zahir’ (Apparent), and is also a reflection of one’s heart but generates from one’s deeds and actions.

About Imam Al-Bayhaqi

Abu Bakr Ahmad ibn al-Hussayn al-Bayhaqi the jurisprudent imam, hadith master, authority in the foundations of doctrine, defender of the School both in its foundations and its branches, one of the mountains of Islamic knowledge was born in the year 384 AH in the Small town of Khusraugird near Bayhaq in Central Asia, he became a famous Sunni hadith expert, following the Shafi'i school in Fiqh.

It is noteworthy that neither al-Tirmidhi’s Sunan, nor al-Nasa’i’s, nor Ibn Majah’s were transmitted to al-Bayhaqi, as stated by al-Dhahabi and others. Al-Dhahabi said, “His sphere in hadith is not large, but Allah blessed him in his narrations for the excellence of his method in them and his sagacity and expertise in the subject-matters and narrators.

From islam to Atheism – may allah save us from that

Amal Farah, a 32-year-old banking executive, is laughing about a contestant singing off-key in the last series of The X Factor. For a woman who was not allowed to listen to music when she was growing up, this is a delight. After years of turmoil, she is in control of her own life.

On the face of it, she is a product of modern Britain. Born in Somalia to Muslim parents, she grew up in Yemen and came to the UK in her late teens. After questioning her faith, she became an atheist and married a Jewish lawyer. But this has come at a cost. When she turned her back on her religion, she was disowned by her family and received death threats. She has not seen her mother or her siblings for eight years. None of them have met her husband or daughter.

“It was the hardest thing I’ve ever done – telling my observant family that I was having doubts. My mum was shocked; she began to cry. It was very painful for her. When she realised I actually meant it, she cut communication with me,” said Ms Farah. “She was suspicious of me being in contact with my brothers and sisters. She didn’t want me to poison their heads in any way. I felt like a leper and I lived in fear. As long as they knew where I was, I wasn’t safe.”

This is the first time Ms Farah has spoken publicly about her experience of leaving her faith, after realising that she did not want to keep a low profile for ever. She is an extreme case – her mother, now back in Somalia, has become increasingly radical in her religious views. But Ms Farah is not alone in wanting to speak out.

It can be difficult to leave any religion, and those that do can face stigma and even threats of violence. But there is a growing movement, led by former Muslims, to recognise their existence. Last week, an Afghan man is believed to have become the first atheist to have received asylum in Britain on religious grounds. He was brought up as a Muslim but became an atheist, according to his lawyers, who said he would face persecution and possibly death if he returned to Afghanistan.

In more than a dozen countries people who espouse atheism or reject the official state religion of Islam can be executed under the law, according to a recent report by the International Humanist and Ethical Union. But there is an ongoing debate about the “Islamic” way to deal with apostates. Broadcaster Mohammed Ansar says the idea that apostates should be put to death is “not applicable” in Islam today because the act was traditionally conflated with state treason.

Some scholars point out that it is against the teachings of Islam to force anyone to stay within the faith. “The position of many a scholar I have discussed the issue with is if people want to leave, they can leave,” said Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, the assistant secretary general of the Muslim Council of Britain. “I don’t believe they should be discriminated against or harmed in any way whatsoever. There is no compulsion in religion.”

Baroness Warsi, the Minister of State for Faith and Communities, agreed. “One of the things I’ve done is put freedom of religion and belief as top priority at the Foreign Office,” she said. “I’ve been vocal that it’s about the freedom to manifest your faith, practise your faith and change your faith. We couldn’t be any clearer. Mutual respect and tolerance are what is required for people to live alongside each other.”

Yet, even in Britain, where the freedom to change faiths is recognised, there is a growing number of people who choose to define themselves by the religion they left behind. The Ex-Muslim Forum, a group of former Muslims, was set up seven years ago. Then, about 15 people were involved; now they have more than 3,000 members around the world. Membership has reportedly doubled in the past two years. Another branch, the Ex-Muslims of North America, was launched last year.

Their increasing visibility is controversial. There are those who question why anyone needs to define themselves as an “ex-Muslim”; others accuse the group of having an anti-Muslim agenda (a claim that the group denies).

Maryam Namazie, a spokeswoman for the forum – which is affiliated with the Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain (CEMB) – said: “The idea behind coming out in public is to show we exist and that we’re not going anywhere. A lot of people feel crazy [when they leave their faith]; they think they’re not normal. The forum is a place to meet like-minded people; to feel safe and secure.”

Sulaiman (who does not want to reveal his surname), a Kenyan-born 32-year-old software engineer living in East Northamptonshire, lost his faith six years ago. His family disowned him. “I knew they would have to shun me,” he said. “They are a religious family from a [close] community in Leicester. If anyone [finds out] their son is not a Muslim, it looks bad for them.” He added that people “find it strange” that he meets up with ex-Muslims, but he said it is important to know “there is a community out there who care about you and understand your issues”.

Another former Muslim in her late twenties, who does not want to be named, said the “ex-Muslim” identity was particularly important to her. “Within Islam, leaving [the religion] is inconceivable. [The term] atheist doesn’t capture my struggle,” she said, adding that her family does not know the truth about how she feels.

Pakistani-born Sayed (not his real name), 51, who lives in Leeds, lost his faith decades ago. He left home at 23 and moved between bedsits to avoid family members who were looking for him. He told his family about his atheism only two years ago. “I was brought up a strict Muslim, but one day, I realised there was no God,” he said. He told his mother and sister by letter that he was an atheist but they found it difficult to comprehend.

“Whenever I tell my sister or my mum that I am depressed, stressed or paranoid, they say it’s because I don’t pray or read the Koran enough,” he said, adding that he will not go to his mother’s funeral when she dies. “I won’t be able to cope with the stress or the religious prayers. There’s quite a lot of stigma around.”

Iranian-born Maryam Namazie, 47, said that it does not have to be this way. Her religious parents supported her decision to leave their faith in her late teens. “After I left, they still used to whisper verses in my ear for safety, but then I asked them not to. There was no pressure involved and they never threatened me,” she said. “If we want to belong to a political party, or religious group, we should be able to make such choices.”

Zaheer Rayasat, 26, from London, has not yet told his parents that he is an atheist. Born into a traditional Pakistani family, he said he knew he didn’t believe in God from the age of 15.

“Most people transition out of faith, but I would say I crashed out. It was sudden and it left a big black hole. I found it hard to reconcile hell with the idea that God was beneficent and merciful.

“I’m sort of worried what will happen when [my parents] find out. For a lot of older Muslims, to be a Muslim is an identity, whereas, for me, it’s a theological, philosophical position. They might feel they have failed as parents; some malicious people might call them up, gloating about it. Some would see it as an act of betrayal. My hope is that they will eventually forgive me for it.”