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How to acclimate your betta

Many pet lovers prefer to buy exotic species of betta fish from overseas, mainly from Indonesia, through betta matching sites like Jazzy Bettas. However, traveling to the US from a foreign country where the journey takes about six or seven days can be extremely stressful to your new fish. After all, the water parameters are different here in the USA and your fish has to travel a long way in a small and cramped bag for a long time. When they do finally get here, they are often a bit paler and definitely stressed from the long trip.

The good news is that you don’t have to let your new scaled friend suffer. There are things you can do to help them get properly acclimated to their new home. Tips that will help you avoid temperature shock and get them used to their new environment so they don’t experience illness or disease when you put them in their new tank. So, let’s get started in teaching you how to properly acclimate your imported betta fish. After all, you care about your betta fish and want the best for them.

Selection of the right tank to properly acclimate your imported betta fish – In the wild, betta fish live in small muddy pools; however, a small container like a plastic cup is never suitable for a betta. That is, you should never keep your betta in a |tank smaller than a three-gallon capacity. Your fish needs space to swim around. They need plenty of hiding spots and live plants too. If you don’t want to add live plants, you can add silk ones to their tank. You also need to provide them with a sponge filter or a low-flow filter. Just make sure that any filtration system you add doesn’t flow too fast as this can cause high currents that can damage delicate fins and lead to a stressed fish.

Get the tank ready to properly acclimate your imported betta fish – The new tank should be washed thoroughly with lukewarm water, to eliminate all dirt and germs. You also need to rinse any sand gravel, or artificial plants, and make sure that all décor is safe for your new fish. You see, bettas have delicate fins that can be easily caught on decorations. One way to make sure a decoration is safe is to run it against some women’s pantyhose. If it tears the pantyhose then it will likely tear your betta’s fins as well. After you have added the decorations, you should fill your betta’s tank with distilled or tap water that has been dechlorinated. You can also add products like Safe Start to add beneficial bacteria to the tank. Always leave enough space at the top of the tank to enable your fish to move to the top so they can breathe easily. You also need to check the temperature and pH level of the water before introducing your new betta fish into the tank.

Acclimatize the betta while in a bag – Normally, a betta fish is imported in a well-ventilated plastic bag where it can safely remain for a few days. However, the water in the shipping container will be full of ammonia byproducts so you’ll need to remove as much of the waste as you can before adding your fish. Before you do that, you will need to follow these tips:

  1. Allow the original unopened plastic shipping bag containing your newly imported betta to float in the new tank for at least 30 minutes. This will enable your fish to get used to the new water temperature.
  2. Next, carefully open the bag and poor out some of the old water that the fish was shipped in into a separate container where you will throw it away.
  3. Third, you will add a small amount of the newly prepared tank water to the shipping bag. You will then tie the end of the shipping bag with a rubber band.
  4. Next, you will take the shipping bag that contains a bit of the new water from the new tank. You will float the bag above the water of your newly prepared tank for 15 minutes.
  5. After 15 minutes, you will add a bit more of the new tank water to the plastic bag the fish was shipped in. This will help your betta to become accustomed to the temperature, hardness, and pH of the new tank water before you place them in it.
  6. Fill the plastic bag with more added tank water and float it for about 15 minutes more.
  7. Repeat the process a few more times and, if needed, pour out a bit of the water from the shipping plastic bag so you don’t have too much water but continue to float the bag.
  8. After 1.5 hours of acclimating your new betta, you can carefully pour out most of the water from the shipping plastic bag and then gently place your fish in the new tank by tilting the bag and letting your fish swim out. Some people prefer to put their fish in an aquarium net and then place it in the new tank whereas others prefer to add a bit of the existing water containing the fish directly into the tank. It is up to you, but when you add some of the shipping water, you can introduce ammonia and nitrites into your tank.
  9. At this point, your betta fish should be properly acclimated; however, they will still feel a bit stressed so give it a bit of time to explore its surroundings.
  10. Turn off the tank lights for a day or so and then feed your fish on the second day as they typically don’t eat the first day or so.

In conclusion, learning how to properly acclimate your imported betta fish takes a bit of time but it is definitely not impossible to do so. Just make sure that you have the tank already set up and don’t rush the acclimation process. In time, your newly imported fish will get used to its new tank and you will certainly enjoy it for years and years to come.

How to acclimate your betta

In the last Betta Answers lesson you discovered how to properly transport your Betta Fish home from the pet store.

Today you will discover how to properly acclimate your Betta Fish to its new tank.

Now some of you may already have brought your Betta home from the store and put it in the tank, so if you didn’t do things exactly right so don’t worry. It’s generally not a life or death situation if done incorrectly, but if done properly will greatly reduce the stress your Betta goes through.

Just try to keep those tips in mind for any future Betta Fish that you buy.

Acclimating your Betta Fish
Remember how your Betta Fish doesn’t like rapid changes in environment? Well the water that is in the bag most likely is not
exactly like the tank that you prepared.

Here’s some tips on how to transition your Betta into his new tank:

  • Let the bag/cup float in the tank for at least a few hours. What this does is make the temperature in the bag the same as the tank. This way there is no temperature shock to your Betta Fish when released into the tank.
  • If the fish is in a bag try cutting a small hole in the bag to let some tank water in. You want to slowly get the tank water to blend with the bag water. The worst thing you could do is simply dump the whole bag in the tank when you get home.
  • Use a clothespin or tape to keep the bag hanging in the tank and cut more holes every hour or so until the bag seems completely full with tank water

Quarantine Tank
Another option to acclimate your Betta is to use what’s called a Quarantine Tank, which is a temporary tank the Betta lives
in for a week or so before moving to its permanent tank.

It allows the Betta to “de-stress” from the ride home before encountering its permanent home with gravel, plants, and filters.
Plus the Quarantine tank allows the Betta to slowly adjust to water conditions at home.

I like putting my fish in a bucket when I acclimate them, then slowly add water using a cup (every 5 minutes a cup of water until the amount of water in the bucket has tripled) or using drip acclimation. Can’t remember I’ve ever lost a fish in the acclimation process this way.

When you are ready to put you betta in the tank I would use a net, don’t add water from the store in your aquarium.

Preston Landolt

  • Sep 23, 2018

BettaNovice101

  • Sep 23, 2018

The slower acclimation process the better for a betta. They are extremely challenged by fast changes. It stresses them. In my opinion. It never hurts to take your time! You can leave it in the cup, and add drops from your aquarium into the cup he is in. Once the cup is full, lift him out of the cup and into your aquarium. Do not let an of the water from the cup get into your aquarium. In my opinion.

Preston Landolt

  • Sep 23, 2018

BettaNovice101

  • Sep 23, 2018

Preston Landolt

  • Sep 23, 2018

Absolutely, your best option is not to let the water in your tank, I just think it’s a lot more important when introducing many fish from more than one tank because places like petsmart and petco have all tanks running on one system. Betta cups are separate so it’s not of big of a risk.

gabby98

  • Sep 23, 2018

I started off with my Betta in a tiny tank (less than 1gal) and felt he needed more room to swim, so I upgraded to a 10gal.

The first thing I did was set up the tank.
1) filter and decorations
2) water heater and thermometer
3) water conditioner and “stability” drops

MAKE SURE THE TEMPERATURE IS RIGHT.
Putting a Betta in drastically cooler/warmer water can really shock him.

Before I transferred my Betta, I waited until the thermometer consistently read about 80°

Once all the setup was ready, I did transfer him into a bag and let him float in the water for 30mins to an hour. After that, I opened the bag and let the water from the tank enter the bag, and after a few minutes fully released the Betta into the tank.

If you do decide to float using a bag, you just want to be careful that it isn’t too long, because Bettas use their lungs to breath air & a tied bag can hinder this.

Once my Betta was out of the bag, he was happy as can be. His energy level increased dramatically, he started eating MUCH more and interacting with the aquarium.

I think the constant, warm temperature made a HUGEEE difference. So I would say for sure, make sure his water temp is right before you do anything.

Siamese fighting fish are hypersensitive to their surroundings and need to be gently introduced to their new enviorment. If you bring your betta fish home and put him directly into this new tank without acclimating him properly the following can happen

  1. Stress
  2. severe trauma
  3. Shock induced death

It’s critical to check the basic parameters including temperature and pH before adding fish to their new home.

Beginning the Acclimation Process

Thins you will need to get your new tank ready:

  1. Water conditioners
  2. Thermometer
  3. Testing supplies

There are a few different situations you may find yourself in.

  1. Freshly cycled tank– You might have set up an aquarium weeks ago and cycled it to prepare for your new fish.
  2. Established tank – You may have an established tank already. You will need to quarantine your new fish for the suggested 4 week period before adding him the group.
  3. 100% Water change – You may have decided to do full 100% water changes and are setting up your aquarium just before the acclimation process.

Note: If you are setting up a new aquarium, it is suggested that you do this 24 hours prior to acclimating your new fish. This will allow for off-gassing (chemicals in gas form are allowed to leave the water).

Acclimating a betta sorority? I will be getting six new bettas for a community tank and want to add them at the same time as recommended. How have people done acclimation in this situation? Generally, I was planning to drip, have a five gallon bucket on hand and a heater if needed. They’re coming direct on order and I’m just picking up at the LFS without the girls hitting the LFS tanks at all. I think/hope that’s everything. Thanks much!

Just let them get up to the same temperature and then put them in. Without bag/cup water. Also what size is the tank and is it cycled? Anything else in there? Would love to see set up!

I would drip acclimate them in the 5gal bucket together, and use an airline . I would not slow the airline just let the water run. Then as soon as the bucket is close to full, stop the water flow, and scoop out the girls.

I’d then top off the tank.

It’s a 20g long, planted and cycled tank ready for fish. Will be delighted to post pics when they’re all in. I have the drip kit and this will be my first crack at using it. Thanks for the assists!

Did you buy a kit? Or is this a diy?

I’d like to see pictures, just curious, are you having any other fish with them?

Ask the LFS to find out water parameters from the breeder and see how far off they are from yours. Ask for GH and KH and if they can give pH that would be great as well. The further off the two tanks are will determine approximately how long the drip will take.

I would not use tank water for this if things are to far off since it could take a while. Getting the tank clean completely refreshed and using newly conditioned water from the tap will help offset any ammonia build up during the process.

Good luck and I can’t wait for pics!

Kit, based on what I read here and this being my first time doing anything other than floating the bag and dumping all the water back in 😊

I will have false Julii Cories and ultimately black neon tetras to round out all levels of the tank.

FischGeck-I don’t think I’ll catch the guy bringing in my order to ask, so I just ordered the KH/GH test kit so I can test PH as well as those other two parameters. You all have given such good advice, I feel much more prepared to try it all out, seemingly at once!

would not using tank water risk temperature shock? I have RO tap water with a 6.4 PH, softened well water with a PH of 7.4 and tank at

7.9. Tank PH is high despite mixing the well and RO water when I filled it, using a peat layer under my Eco complete and having mopani wood in there. I think I’ll be using Seachem Equilibrium (if the GH is as low as I suspect it will be with softened water) and Seachem Stress Coat once my test kit arrives. Does raising the GH impact PH?
I’m a bit concerned about how different the parameters might be once I test the fishy water and I guess I can use the heater if the differences are great and take longer to acclimate. Seems like I should use the tank if the fishy water is much lower than their long term home in the tank, but maybe I’m missing something. Happy to keep learning on MAC!

Those may interest you:

Some tips for keeping betta sorority and what I have learned
Betta Sorority
A Complete Guide to Betta Fish Colours and Patterns: Which Pattern is Your Betta?
Choose Your Own Adventure: Beautiful Betta! Learn how to properly care for your new betta fish.

Have you used the high range pH test on your well water?

Yes, use tank water if you are mixing RO and well water. glad you mentioned that! Just make sure is it is new water where the Prime can work during the drip acclimation process.

GH won’t affect pH. KH is what does that. Personally, I would bypass the soft water and use your well water before the softener. this may change your mixture, but it will add calcium and magnesium to the tank that are needed much more than the sodium that replaces them. You could play with it after you get the girls acclimated though and then the switch over can be made gradually.

You are lucky my friend. you can make any water solution you want and keep most any fish with a RO system. I am jealous.

Yes, I’m using the high PH test on the well water 😀 . Both the RO and the well water are softened, don’t know if that matters. I was planning on changing over to the RO with PWCs over time after fish are added and using the Equilibrium for the re-mineralization. Forgive the ignorance, if using RO (or softened well water for that matter) why Prime?
I am very happy to have the water options on tap as well as the wisdom found on MAC to know my assets and risks! Counting down to July 8 when fish come into town. I’m also lucky that my LFS will order anything I’ve asked them for so far. What else am I missing? Thanks much.

If you use straight RO water and re-mineralize you don’t need conditioner at all unless you experience a mini-cycle in which case the Prime would detox ammonia and/or nitrite until the cycle gets back into check. As far as well water goes, you may not need it if you don’t have nitrogen compounds present, but it will neutralize other heavy metal compounds that can do harm in the tank.

I am not familiar with equilibrium as it is much easier and cheaper, IMO, to use baking soda and epsom salt to re-mineralize.

The softened water is different when you consider fish. Softened water replaces calcium and magnesium mostly with sodium or potassium. don’t use potassium softened water for fish I am told. The TDS, total dissolved solids is changed very little so osmoregulation, as far as softened versus unsoftened, changes very little. The problem is that fish need calcium. more some then others.

Once you run the softened water through the RO system, which you don’t need to do BTW, it removes everything from the water. depending on diaphragm size of course. This water, by itself, is deadly to fish as they need minerals as much as we do.

I’ve had a double tail betta since last August (about nine months). His tail has slowly deteriorated to the point where the top part of the double tail is barely there. I’ve tried anti-biotics and nothing has worked. Even doing 100% water changes haven’t helped and keeping the ammonia away hasn’t worked.

He also has a slight curve to his spine when I look down on him in the water. He had that when I brought him home.

At this point I do not think I can heal his tail. Question is, do you guys think he’s in actual pain? I’m not sure what to do now. I don’t want to euthanize him, yet I am wondering how much his quality of life is diminished to the point where I should put him down.

Thanks for advice.

kizno1

Fish Connoisseur
  • Apr 14, 2010
  • #2

kelly528

Fishaholic
  • Apr 14, 2010
  • #3

Lets run through this one more time with a fresh set of eyes. Bear with me and answer the questions.

First of all, are you absolutely certain beyond a doubt that it’s fin rot? Some bettas will bit their tails to stumps.

Secondly, what antibiotics have you tried?

How big is the tank?

Cycled or uncycled?

How often do you clean it?

How much water do you change?

GuppyGoddess

Fish Herder
  • Apr 14, 2010
  • #4

Lets run through this one more time with a fresh set of eyes. Bear with me and answer the questions.

First of all, are you absolutely certain beyond a doubt that it’s fin rot? Some bettas will bit their tails to stumps.

Secondly, what antibiotics have you tried?

How big is the tank?

Cycled or uncycled?

How often do you clean it?

How much water do you change?

The reason I think it’s fin rot is because the tips are black.
Tried tetracycline
5-gallon
uncycled
25-50% change every four days

He looks pretty bad now. He’s swimming around but when at the top tipped ever so slightly at an angle.

kelly528

Fishaholic
  • Apr 14, 2010
  • #5

The reason I think it’s fin rot is because the tips are black.
Tried tetracycline
5-gallon
uncycled
25-50% change every four days

He looks pretty bad now. He’s swimming around but when at the top tipped ever so slightly at an angle.

Oh dear that does sound like fin rot. Not sure how often you do 100% cleanings but I think I see your problem.

Uncycled tanks do need to be cleaned 100% when you clean them. Why?

For example, say your betta produces .25ppm of ammonia per day. You change the water 50% daily.

Day 1: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .25 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .125 ppm ammonia.
Day 2: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .38 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .19 ppm of ammonia.
Day 3: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .44 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .22 ppm of ammonia.
Day 4: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .48 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .24 ppm of ammonia.
Day 5: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .5 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .25 ppm of ammonia.

So from day 5 onwards, even with daily water changes your betta’s tank will be stuck at .25 ppm!

Thats just an example but the math will be similar for your tank (assuming you only ever do PWCs) and could be causing big problems with your water chemistry.

For treatment I would try a different antibiotic (Maracyn 2 perhaps), up the water changes to 100% and keep an eye out for regrowth

Assaye

Fish Gatherer
  • Apr 14, 2010
  • #6

I agree with Kelly. What I would do is 50% every day (if tests show it’s needed) or every other day, and then 100% every 3-4 days.

That’s what I do to keep my isolation tank ammonia free when I run it without a filter

GuppyGoddess

Fish Herder
  • Apr 14, 2010
  • #7

The reason I think it’s fin rot is because the tips are black.
Tried tetracycline
5-gallon
uncycled
25-50% change every four days

He looks pretty bad now. He’s swimming around but when at the top tipped ever so slightly at an angle.

Oh dear that does sound like fin rot. Not sure how often you do 100% cleanings but I think I see your problem.

Uncycled tanks do need to be cleaned 100% when you clean them. Why?

For example, say your betta produces .25ppm of ammonia per day. You change the water 50% daily.

Day 1: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .25 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .125 ppm ammonia.
Day 2: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .38 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .19 ppm of ammonia.
Day 3: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .44 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .22 ppm of ammonia.
Day 4: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .48 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .24 ppm of ammonia.
Day 5: Betta makes .25 ppm of ammonia for a total of .5 ppm. You do a 50% PWC. Now we have .25 ppm of ammonia.

So from day 5 onwards, even with daily water changes your betta’s tank will be stuck at .25 ppm!

Thats just an example but the math will be similar for your tank (assuming you only ever do PWCs) and could be causing big problems with your water chemistry.

For treatment I would try a different antibiotic (Maracyn 2 perhaps), up the water changes to 100% and keep an eye out for regrowth

INTRODUCTION: If you got a betta fish for the first time and you feel like you’re already a pro since you’ve got the tank all set up, well you should be able to figure out the missing piece here. You see setting up your tank is not enough to make sure your betta feels comfortable in his new home. How you place Phineas in your tank matters a lot. And this is serious. One wrong move could leave your fishy friend stressed out and sick. Susceptible to any number of betta fish diseases. And this is exactly why you need to properly acclimatize any betta to its new home.

The key here is to put the least amount of stress possible to your betta. And this can be done by not simply dumping the little guy directly into the tank water. You never do this. You never want to simply release the betta from its pet store bag or cup directly into its new home. Instead, let it float inside the tank for 15-60 minutes. This allows the water inside the pet store bag to adjust its temperature and level with the tank water’s temp. The bigger the bag, the longer it needs to be floated.

That’s part one of acclimation. Part two involves adding water from the tank into the bag. Some like to add a small amount of tank water into the bag every 5 minutes. This helps your male or female betta fish to adjust to the different pH and such of its new watery kingdom. Failure to do this can be a shocking experience too.

Once you’ve let the bag float long enough or after the bag is half filled with tank water, it’s time to release the fish into its private preserve. Note you don’t want to just dump the contents, fish, water and all in. Reason being the water your fish was in may not be the best – which is putting it mildly. Hopefully the water you are introducing him to is. So rather than pollute the tank with tainted even toxic water, you want to extract the fish from the bag so you can dispose of the water he came in.

Obviously you can do this using a net. But there is always the danger of your betta’s fins getting damaged and you don’t want that. So a better option would be to scoop out the fish with your hand. As much as possible, do not let any of the water in the bag get in the tank since the pet store water is home to many bacteria and who knows what that can make your betta really sick really. (I mean you’ve seen some of the big box store bettas haven’t you?) Just be sure to immediately dump the pet store water down the drain immediately after you’ve transferred the betta into the tank.

Okay but what if the betta you got from the pet store was transported in a plastic cup rather than a plastic bag? Would you still do the same thing? No, not really. Instead here are two different options you can choose from to acclimate the fish in this case.

First option is to gently transfer the betta and the existing water from the cup into your own say ziplock baggie. Then repeat the acclimation process as just outlined.

Second option is to let your little betta male cool his heels in the cup. Gradually add a bit of water tank water every 2-4 minutes and this whole process should take about 20-30 minutes. Then you may now remove Phineas from the cup and slowly release him into the tank. Again, bring in the least amount of cup water into the tank. With this option it may take a longer while for the cup water to stabilize.

Another challenge you may come across here is how to let the cup float without tipping over. Simple. Place the cup in your net and use the net to support the cup. It can be tricky. But you should be able to position the cup in the net without having to hold it during the acclimation period.

CONCLUSION: Only then can you say that you’re a pro in betta fish keeping once you’ve done all this. Phineas will surely thank you for acclimating him to his new home. Since you’ll never know the stresses that come along.

As some of you know my betta Supernova passed away recently due to unknown reasons/something out of my control. I have now ordered a beautiful healthy betta from Space City Fish and Coral!! 😊
But I have a question regarding when he comes how to acclimate him.
I have heard contradicting information on whether it is better to drip acclimate or just temperature acclimate and quickly transfer fish to tank since opening the bag releases the co2 and raises ph, making ammonia toxic, thus ,making drip acclimation bad for the fish? I am just not sure and would like you guy’s opinions.

I personally drip acclimate all of my fish. I test the bag water and my tank to determine how different the parameters are. That’s how I determine how long to drip acclimate. I put an air stone in with the fish while acclimating to keep the water oxygenated since some of my more sensitive fish have taken several hours for acclimating.

For less sensitive fish I’ll usually set up a drip with 5-6 drops per second. My Rams went at a rate of 2 drops a second. Once the water level doubles, I pour out half. Check parameters against tank to see how close you are. Rinse and repeat until close.

That’s just my approach. I’ve never lost a fish shortly after purchase, but it may not be necessary for a Betta, but I don’t really know.

I understand how that would work for fish purchased locally, but this is different in the case of a fish who has been shipped several hours up to a day across the country, so I am hoping for someone with experience acclimating shipped fish.

I have heard that with shipped fish after a long time of the fish breathing and accumulating waste in the bag, co2 levels rise and ph drops which makes it so that the fish waste, ammonia, isn’t toxic, but once you open the bag and release the trapped co2 the ph goes up and makes the ammonia toxic. but yet the water parameters in the fish’s shipped water still may be different to my water so I just need to know what would be least stressful for the fish in this situation.

I have experience ordering fish from out of state, not sure why it’s assumed I don’t?

If they’re in a long transit you could add Amquel after dumping half the water and drip as usual. Not ideal, but with the amquel to neutralize until you have enough water to dump half again, it makes it less dangerous. Essentially doing two or three fifty percent water changes during the drip time. Just my way, not necessarily the right way. I was just offering up some help. Sorry if it’s not what you’re looking for.

Thank you for your input, I appreciate it. I may just go ahead and float the bag with tank lights off and then immediately add the betta, I just do not want to risk leaving him in water with ammonia and cause ammonia burns. even using something like amquel may not detoxify all of the ammonia build up in the bag, and of course any ammonia present is toxic, and drip acclimation will leave him exposed to the ammonia to long.

Those may interest you:

Choose Your Own Adventure: Beautiful Betta! Learn how to properly care for your new betta fish.
Cleaning my betta's tank.How do I acclimate him afterward?
A Complete Guide to Betta Fish Colours and Patterns: Which Pattern is Your Betta?
I just got new neon tetras, how do I acclimate?

You seem committed to the idea that 24 hours in a bag the size of a cup is going to have a dangerous amount of ammonia in it? And that this new betta is going to be sensitive to ammonia unlike all the betta in ever shop that has betta in cups.These betta are in ammonia for the last 6 hours every day . This new guy could be in ammonia for an hour?

When fish travel many days from South America by AIR in the smallest weight of water to save postal costs and then go through more time in customs then the “ plop and drop “ method makes sense.

Plop and drop.
Get the bag to temperature. Cut it open plop the fish out into a jug net it out immediately and drop it into totally new water.
Not something I have done . I have seen videos of it with fish brought ( posted) back from Peru. The colour of the water is quite shocking. I can’t smell the water but I see the adult men gagging at the smell.

When you walk into any shop that has new fish arriving from the mail each week what way does the shop acclimate?

I will try and find a link Dean and Cory opening their South American fishing expedition bags . With strong men gagging at the smell of bags that have been many days in the post.

My aquarium club ( Society) had a talk on posting fish years ago when postage took more time. Some of the things they had to do in the old days made for interesting Conversation. Angle fish that would swim sideways when the bags were opened etc.

Not the link I was thinking of but worth a look if you have not been following their last trip to Peru .

This is the video ( I think) of bags that had be delayed in customs .Its pretty Gross water.

Have you been wondering how to take care of a betta fish? With over 73 types of betta fish, it’s no wonder that bettas are some of the most popular freshwater fishes for aquarists. Originally bred for fighting, these fish are now prized for their variety of colors and patterns. Though betta fish are typically low maintenance, it’s important that they receive the proper care in order to live long and happy lives.

Betta Environments

Giving your betta proper care starts with the tank and the environment you build in it. In the wild, betta fish prefer still waters with a lot of vegetation and rocks for hiding places. Their territory isn’t very large, but they still need room to swim.

The ideal tank size for a betta fish should hold least three gallons of well-filtered tank water. Rocks with large holes and live or fake plants (preferably silk instead of the rough-edged plastic) are necessary additions to help your betta feel at home and relaxed.

The water should be around 76 to 81 degrees Fahrenheit with a medium pH of 6.5 to 7.5. You can use a tank thermometer and a heater to maintain water temperature, but you’ll have to check the pH level every couple of weeks.

Filters are also recommended in betta tanks because betta prefer a very clean environment. In addition, having tank mates that clean, like kuhli loaches and Malaysian trumpet snails, is a good idea.

Cleaning Schedule

As betta prefer clean environments, it’s important to have a cleaning schedule. For a filtered five-gallon tank, water cycling (or removing part of the water and adding in new water) should be done once or twice a week. A full clean should take place at least once per month.

You’ll also need to clean the tank and decorations during the full clean. Never use soap as soaps can leave residues that can kill your betta. Instead, you can use very hot water and white vinegar, but always make sure you rinse thoroughly.

Make sure to acclimate your betta to the new water before reintroducing them to their tanks.

Feeding Schedule

Wondering how to take care of a betta fish with quality fish food? Betta fish are natural carnivores, and they should eat food that is meaty and high in protein. You can find many good pellet and flake foods on the market, but it’s important that you choose a brand that uses meat, fish, and shrimp as their primary ingredients.

Betta are also known for being quite picky. If you’ve got a picky betta, consider giving it dried shrimp or bloodworms.

It’s best to feed betta once or twice a day. As they have small stomachs, they’ll usually only need two to four pellets, but pay attention to how much your betta eats. If there is food left over within an hour, then you’ve fed them too much. Make sure you remove the excess food or have fish that clean as tank mates for your betta.

Final Thoughts

Stop wondering how to take care of a betta fish? You can succeed at betta fish care. Betta are low-maintenance fish. Their care takes just a few minutes a day and just a little longer for cleaning schedules. Make sure that you create a good environment for your betta; keep their tanks clean and feed them high-quality fish foods to prolong their life spans.