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How to access the system configuration utility

When you want to add more memory (RAM) for your desktop computer or buy the latest graphics card available in the market, the first thing you need to know is your system configuration.

Knowing your basic System Configuration details like Motherboard Model, Processor Type etc. helps you to buy compatible devices for your computer.

System configuration is also useful when you need to update your device drivers, troubleshoot issues in your computer, buy the latest softwares or games, etc.

If you have assembled the system all by yourself then you should be aware of all these details, but what if the system was assembled by some vendor?

You can easily find your System Configuration without reaching out to the vendor who assembled the system. There are various ways to get this information and I have highlighted few of them over here for your reference.

If you are running windows operating system then below are some of the ways to get these details:

1) My Computer Properties

Right Click on your My Computer and click Properties. You can also press Windows key + Pause/Break key to launch the properties window. The System Properties gives you some basic details about your system as shown below:

How to access the system configuration utility

My Computer Properties

2) MSINFO32

You can just type msinfo32 from your Run window to view the System Configuration. The System Summary gives you some of the basic information like System Manufacturer, Model, Type, Processor Name etc.

3) Command Prompt

If you are more comfortable with command prompt then you can just launch your command prompt and type systeminfo to get the basic system details.

4) PowerShell

Just type PowerShell from your Run Window and you should see a window just like command prompt. You don’t have to be an Power Shell expert to get these details, just copy and paste the below power shell script to get the basic details.

Processor Details

$processorDetails = Get-WmiObject Win32_Processor
$processorDetails.Manufacturer
$processorDetails.Name

Motherboard Details

$motherBoardDetails = Get-WmiObject Win32_ComputerSystem
$motherBoardDetails.Manufacturer
$motherBoardDetails.Model

BIOS Details

How to access the system configuration utility

Get System Configuration using Power Shell

The commands that I have given here is just a tip of the iceberg, PowerShell is very powerful and can get you much more details if you want.

5) System Configuration Utility

There are some utilities readily available which gives much more details about your system than most of the above options. Though there are lots of tools available to check the system configuration, CPU-Z and HWiNFO are the two that are widely used.

The CPU-Z comes in both installable and portable versions. Download the portable version which is less than 2 MB. Extract the contents of the zip file and run the EXE based on your system type(32-bit/64-bit)

The CPU tab gives you the complete details about your Processor.

Mainboard tab gives you the details about your Motherboard Manufacturer and Model.

The SPD Tab lists the memory slots that are available in your System and shows in which slots your RAMs are located. The Module size shows the amount of RAM that you have installed and Manufacturer details are also displayed.

The Graphics Tab shows the memory card that you have installed on your system with the amount of memory.

You can save the complete hardware details of your system by exporting the data into TXT or HTML file by accessing the Tools button.

Use the shortcut keys F5 to save a snapshot of the current tab as BMP image.

HWiNFO

HWiNFO installers are available for both 32 bit and 64 bit systems or you could just download the portable version for your system type.

How to access the system configuration utility

HWiNFO System Summary

The summary view just gives you the complete information in a single window.

The detailed system configuration report can be exported in several formats like .LOG, .CSV, .XML, .HTML, .MHT or as a simple text report.

6) Online Services

You could also check you system configuration details online at Intel website by navigating to the below URL:

System Configuration on Intel Website

The service also allows you to save or print the report in HTML file format. Please note that the above service check requires Java to be available on your system.

Linux System Configuration

If you are using a Linux Operating System like Ubuntu then Search using the word hardinfo in the in the Ubuntu Software Center and it will list you System Profiler and Benchmark tool. Install this tool which will give good information about your hardware devices.

System Profiler and Benchmark tool

You could also Generate Report based on specific categories like Computer, Devices and Network.

Curious about Ubuntu? Want to try Ubuntu for a change? Check out my article – Top 3 Options to Install and Try Ubuntu.

Macintosh System Configuration

If you are using Macintosh then you can use the System Profiler found under Applications -> Utilities to know about your System Configuration.

There is always a better way to do things and it could be something that you are doing. So how do you find your system configuration when you need it?

The System Configuration tool is also known by its msconfig.exe executable file. This app is useful to people who want to manage the Windows startup and the boot options, as well as troubleshoot stability and performance issues. You can do all that from this handy little tool, but before that, you first have to open it. In this article, we show you eight ways to start System Configuration (msconfig.exe) in Windows:

NOTE: This guide covers Windows 10, Windows 7, and Windows 8.1. Some methods work in all three versions of Windows, others just in one or two. For each method, we mention the Windows version in which it works. If you do not know the version of Windows that you have, read this tutorial: What version of Windows do I have installed?

1. Open the System Configuration tool by using search (all Windows versions)

As with most Windows tools, you can start this utility in several ways. In Windows 10, click or tap inside the search box on the taskbar, start typing “system configuration” or “msconfig” and then click or tap the System Configuration search result.

In Windows 7, search for “system configuration” or “msconfig” in the Start Menu and then click on its shortcut.

How to access the system configuration utility

In Windows 8.1, switch to the Start Screen and type “msconfig”. When the search results are shown, click or tap on msconfig. Note that, in Windows 8.1, searching for “system configuration” yields no results.

2. Open the System Configuration tool by using the Start Menu (Windows 10 only)

Unlike Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, Windows 10 also includes a shortcut for System Configuration in the Start Menu. Open the Start Menu and scroll down to the Windows Administrative Tools. In this folder, click or tap the System Configuration shortcut.

3. Open the System Configuration tool by using the Run window (all Windows versions)

The Run window offers one of the fastest ways to open the System Configuration tool.

Simultaneously press the Windows + R keys on your keyboard to launch it, type “msconfig”, and then press Enter or click/tap on OK. The System Configuration tool should open immediately.

4. Open the System Configuration tool by creating a shortcut for it, anywhere you want (all Windows versions)

Regardless of the Windows version you use, you can create a shortcut to the System Configuration tool and then use it. The shortcut can be placed anywhere you want, like on your desktop or in a shortcuts folder, for example. When creating the shortcut, use the term msconfig as the target location.

If you need help creating shortcuts, this tutorial explains the whole process: How to create shortcuts for apps, files, folders and web pages in Windows .

5. Open the System Configuration tool by using the Command Prompt or PowerShell (all Windows versions)

The System Configuration tool can also be started from the Command Prompt or PowerShell . All you have to do is launch any of them, type msconfig, and then press Enter on your keyboard.

6. Open the System Configuration tool by using the Task Manager (all Windows versions)

You can also open the System Configuration tool using the Task Manager. Simultaneously press the Ctrl + Shift + Esc keys to launch the Task Manager. If you are using a Windows 10 or Windows 8.1 device, and the Task Manager opens up in compact mode , click or tap on “More details.” Then, open the File menu, click or tap on “Run new task,” and type the command msconfig in the “Create new task” window. Finally, press Enter on your keyboard or click or tap OK.

7. Open the System Configuration tool by using the shortcut from our collection (all Windows versions)

We assembled an extensive collection of shortcuts for Windows. Download it , extract it and you can find the System Configuration shortcut in the Administration Tools subfolder for your Windows version.

8. Open the System Configuration tool by using its executable file (all Windows versions)

In all Windows versions, the System Configuration tool is actually an executable file called msconfig.exe, which is found in the “C:WindowsSystem32” folder. If you want, you can open the tool by double-clicking or double-tapping on this executable file.

Did you have to use the System Configuration tool on your Windows PC?

The System Configuration tool can be useful in some situations. It can also be an entry point to some useful troubleshooting wizards. Have you ever had to use it? If yes, what for? Use the comments section below to talk to us.

Its real name is the System Configuration Utility. But most people know it by the program name, MSCONFIG. The utility is ideal for troubleshooting PC Boot issues and Windows problems. In this article, I cover the System Configuration Utility or How to Use System Configuration Utility in Window 10 and its capability to control startup programs as well as to launch other troubleshooting tools.

How to Use System Configuration Utility in Window 10

Table of Contents

To run the System Configuration Utility, press the Windows and r key combination, to see the Run Dialogue box. Type msconfig and press Enter. The System Configuration window appears. The window features several tabs, General, Lists, Startup, Settings.

How to access the system configuration utility

General

Normal startup is the way Windows normally starts, loading everything. Diagnostic startup loads only basic drivers, but not, for example, network drivers. This isn’t the same as Safe Mode, as more of Windows is loaded. Selective Startup, let’s you choose what to load. You might see this item selected on a PC that can boot multiple versions of Windows, or a computer that you have upgraded from and earlier operating system, that would be this system here.

Boot

The boot tab is where you can find the safe boot option which is how you can enter in safe mode in windows. You can choose the safe boot to run other operating system to load if available on your system.

Services

The services tab includes the windows services; these are indeed the background programs that are in progress while you use windows. They are started automatically when the windows is loaded, for instance, you can see the programs like network programs, antivirus programs and so on. This is the place where you can disable any program if it’s behaving erratically, to do so just remove the check mark from the item and click ok, the system restarts and then check whether the system performs normally without the item you which have disabled, if so you can uninstall the program, remove the service, keep it disabled or look for the software update.

Startup

The Startup tab is closely related to services. In windows 10 you can find this option in task manger.

In startup you will see the list of programs which are run when the windows is loaded.

Tools

The tools tab is one of the greatest location for all of windows. Here you see a list of information, troubleshooting or system programs that help you configure windows and solve problems. For instance, choose windows troubleshooting and click launch button not OK. To start any of these utilities just choose that option and click the launch button.

In fact, the tools present here are very useful in troubleshooting the windows for instance, you can choose the resource monitor to check how you PC is consuming the CPU, memory, disk and network. In the list below you can see which programs are consuming the most processor time.

How to access the system configuration utility

If you experience a slow PC, you can review this list to see which programs are using more processor and using a lots of resources. Moreover, You can access the task manger, the registry editor and system restore. The tools tab is just an ideal location for launching various helpful tools and utilities within windows.

Conclusion:

When you bring changes to the system configuration utility click the OK button, now if you have changed any items you will see a prompt to restart the PC, do so, otherwise if you don’t want any changes to take affect click cancel.

When the system restarts again any changes that you have made will take effect, so, you can start troubleshoot or solve some startup mystery, but you must remember to reset the system configuration after you are done. For instance, if you have chosen you PC to start in safe mode, you must uncheck it, otherwise when you restart the PC the same change will take effect. So uncheck the safe mode item and choose normal startup and reactivate any services that you have disabled at that point the system will start normally.

Chris Hoffman
How to access the system configuration utilityChris Hoffman
Editor-in-Chief

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to access the system configuration utility

Microsoft says the classic “System” properties Control Panel has been removed from Windows 10. As of the October 2020 Update (20H2), there’s no way to access it—or is there? Here’s a hidden command that opens the System Control Panel.

To run the command, press Windows+R to open the Run dialog. Copy-paste the following command into the Run dialog and press Enter:

How to access the system configuration utility

The System Control Panel will pop right up in all its former glory!

How to access the system configuration utility

If you miss this page and wish it was easier to access, you can create a shortcut that opens it. On your desktop or in any folder, right-click and select New > Shortcut.

How to access the system configuration utility

In the “Type Location” box, enter the command and click “Next”:

How to access the system configuration utility

Name the shortcut whatever you want—for example, “System.”

How to access the system configuration utility

You now have a shortcut that opens the System Control Panel. To change its icon, right-click it, and select “Properties.” Click the “Shortcut” tab, click “Change Icon,” and choose whatever icon you like.

We tested this on Windows 10’s final October 2020 Update, also known as 20H2. Microsoft may remove the System pane completely from future versions of Windows 10. If so, this command will stop working.

Thanks to [email protected] on the NotebookReview forums for discovering this trick!

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Chris Hoffman
Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek.
Read Full Bio »

When you want to add more memory (RAM) for your desktop computer or buy the latest graphics card available in the market, the first thing you need to know is your system configuration.

Knowing your basic System Configuration details like Motherboard Model, Processor Type etc. helps you to buy compatible devices for your computer.

System configuration is also useful when you need to update your device drivers, troubleshoot issues in your computer, buy the latest softwares or games, etc.

If you have assembled the system all by yourself then you should be aware of all these details, but what if the system was assembled by some vendor?

You can easily find your System Configuration without reaching out to the vendor who assembled the system. There are various ways to get this information and I have highlighted few of them over here for your reference.

If you are running windows operating system then below are some of the ways to get these details:

1) My Computer Properties

Right Click on your My Computer and click Properties. You can also press Windows key + Pause/Break key to launch the properties window. The System Properties gives you some basic details about your system as shown below:

How to access the system configuration utility

My Computer Properties

2) MSINFO32

You can just type msinfo32 from your Run window to view the System Configuration. The System Summary gives you some of the basic information like System Manufacturer, Model, Type, Processor Name etc.

3) Command Prompt

If you are more comfortable with command prompt then you can just launch your command prompt and type systeminfo to get the basic system details.

4) PowerShell

Just type PowerShell from your Run Window and you should see a window just like command prompt. You don’t have to be an Power Shell expert to get these details, just copy and paste the below power shell script to get the basic details.

Processor Details

$processorDetails = Get-WmiObject Win32_Processor
$processorDetails.Manufacturer
$processorDetails.Name

Motherboard Details

$motherBoardDetails = Get-WmiObject Win32_ComputerSystem
$motherBoardDetails.Manufacturer
$motherBoardDetails.Model

BIOS Details

How to access the system configuration utility

Get System Configuration using Power Shell

The commands that I have given here is just a tip of the iceberg, PowerShell is very powerful and can get you much more details if you want.

5) System Configuration Utility

There are some utilities readily available which gives much more details about your system than most of the above options. Though there are lots of tools available to check the system configuration, CPU-Z and HWiNFO are the two that are widely used.

The CPU-Z comes in both installable and portable versions. Download the portable version which is less than 2 MB. Extract the contents of the zip file and run the EXE based on your system type(32-bit/64-bit)

The CPU tab gives you the complete details about your Processor.

Mainboard tab gives you the details about your Motherboard Manufacturer and Model.

The SPD Tab lists the memory slots that are available in your System and shows in which slots your RAMs are located. The Module size shows the amount of RAM that you have installed and Manufacturer details are also displayed.

How to access the system configuration utility

The Graphics Tab shows the memory card that you have installed on your system with the amount of memory.

You can save the complete hardware details of your system by exporting the data into TXT or HTML file by accessing the Tools button.

Use the shortcut keys F5 to save a snapshot of the current tab as BMP image.

HWiNFO

HWiNFO installers are available for both 32 bit and 64 bit systems or you could just download the portable version for your system type.

How to access the system configuration utility

HWiNFO System Summary

The summary view just gives you the complete information in a single window.

The detailed system configuration report can be exported in several formats like .LOG, .CSV, .XML, .HTML, .MHT or as a simple text report.

6) Online Services

You could also check you system configuration details online at Intel website by navigating to the below URL:

How to access the system configuration utility

System Configuration on Intel Website

The service also allows you to save or print the report in HTML file format. Please note that the above service check requires Java to be available on your system.

Linux System Configuration

If you are using a Linux Operating System like Ubuntu then Search using the word hardinfo in the in the Ubuntu Software Center and it will list you System Profiler and Benchmark tool. Install this tool which will give good information about your hardware devices.

How to access the system configuration utility

System Profiler and Benchmark tool

You could also Generate Report based on specific categories like Computer, Devices and Network.

Curious about Ubuntu? Want to try Ubuntu for a change? Check out my article – Top 3 Options to Install and Try Ubuntu.

Macintosh System Configuration

If you are using Macintosh then you can use the System Profiler found under Applications -> Utilities to know about your System Configuration.

There is always a better way to do things and it could be something that you are doing. So how do you find your system configuration when you need it?

If you liked MSConfig.exe, you’re going to love Windows Vista’s System Configuration utility.

If you’ve spent much time troubleshooting configuration errors in Windows XP, then you definitely have come to appreciate the System Configuration Utility or as it’s more commonly known, MSConfig.exe. If so, you’re going to love Windows Vista’s System Configuration utility.

The new System Configuration utility sports a better organized and more concise user interface than its predecessor. And best of all, it now contains a Tools tab that makes it easy to access and run the operating system’s advanced diagnostic utilities. Let’s take a closer look.

Launching System Configuration

Of course, just like in Windows XP, and Windows 98/ME before it, you can launch Windows Vista’s System Configuration utility by pressing [Windows] +R to access the Run dialog box, typing msconfig.exe in the Open box, and then clicking OK. However, it’s a bit quicker to take advantage of the Vista Start Menu’s Instant Search feature: just press [Windows] and begin typing the word System. By the time you type sys, System Configuration should appear at the top of the results pane and you can immediately press [Enter]. Keep in mind that either way you launch System Configuration; you’ll first have to go through a UAC dialog box.

Once System Configuration launches, as shown in Figure A, you’ll discover several differences when compared to Windows XP’s version, which is shown in Figure B. To begin with, you’ll notice that the word Utility has been dropped from the name of the tool. You’ll also notice that the new version no longer displays the SYSTEM.INI and WIN.INI tabs (These files no longer exist in the new Windows operating system.) and that the BOOT.INI tab is now named simply Boot. You’ll also notice a new tab titled Tools.

Vista Tip

While you can easily access the Run dialog box by pressing [Windows] +R, you’ll discover that the Run command no longer appears on Windows Vista’s Start menu by default. It was removed to make room for other commands. However, you can easily put it back in place. Here’s how:

1. Right-click on the Start button and select the Properties command,

2. When the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box appears, make sure that the Start Menu tab is selected.

3. Click the Customize button adjacent to the Start Menu option.

4. Scroll down the list and select the Run Command check box.

General

When you look at the contents of the General tab, shown in Figure A, you’ll notice that it contains the same three startup options as the Windows XP version. Of course, the default is Normal Startup, which loads all the normal device drivers and services. The Diagnostic Startup option loads only with basic services and drivers while the Selective Startup provides you with the option to selectively load system services and startup programs. (The Use Original Boot Configuration check box stays selected unless you change the default setting on the Boot tab.)

When you access the Boot tab, as shown in Figure C, you’ll see that the options and check box settings use friendly names rather then employing the cryptic syntax-based names used in the Boot.ini file. Other than the name changes, all of the settings in the Boot Options panel are the same as in Windows XP.

In the lower right, you’ll find a new check box titled Make All Boot Settings Permanent. When you select this check box, System Configuration will not keep track of any changes that you make. In other words, you will not be able to undo any changes simply by selecting Normal Startup on the General tab. With this setting enabled, you must manually revert any, and all, changes that you’ve made previously.

Clicking the Advanced Options button brings up the Boot Advanced Options dialog box, shown in Figure D. Like the options and check box settings in the Boot Options panel, you’ll find friendly names and all the same settings. The main difference is that in Windows Vista you can now choose and configure the USB port as one of the kernel debugging options.

Services

On the Services tab, you’ll find a list of all the services that start when the computer boots, along with their current status–either Running or Stopped–as shown in Figure E. Just like in Windows XP, you can enable or disable individual services at boot time to troubleshoot services that might be contributing to startup problems. System Configuration will now keep track of the date on which you disabled a particular service.

Startup

Selecting the Startup tab will show you a list of all the applications that run when the Windows Vista starts, as shown in Figure F. Two new features on the Startup tab include the Manufacturer heading, which can be a big help in identifying an application and Date Disabled heading, which will help you keep track of the date on which you disabled a startup application.

Tools

The new Tools tab is a really useful resource to have at your fingertips when troubleshooting configuration errors. As you can see in Figures G and H, the list of tools is comprehensive and includes detailed descriptions. And it’s easy to use: just select the tool you want and click the Launch button.

Conclusion

If you’ve used the System Configuration Utility in Windows XP for troubleshooting configuration errors, then you’ll fee right at home should you find yourself needing to troubleshoot similar problems in Windows Vista. And, you’ll find many new features as I’ve pointed out in this article. If you have any information or comments to share about Windows Vista’s System Configuration tool, please stop by the Discussion area and let us hear from you.

Chris Hoffman
How to access the system configuration utilityChris Hoffman
Editor-in-Chief

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to access the system configuration utility

Microsoft says the classic “System” properties Control Panel has been removed from Windows 10. As of the October 2020 Update (20H2), there’s no way to access it—or is there? Here’s a hidden command that opens the System Control Panel.

To run the command, press Windows+R to open the Run dialog. Copy-paste the following command into the Run dialog and press Enter:

How to access the system configuration utility

The System Control Panel will pop right up in all its former glory!

How to access the system configuration utility

If you miss this page and wish it was easier to access, you can create a shortcut that opens it. On your desktop or in any folder, right-click and select New > Shortcut.

How to access the system configuration utility

In the “Type Location” box, enter the command and click “Next”:

How to access the system configuration utility

Name the shortcut whatever you want—for example, “System.”

How to access the system configuration utility

You now have a shortcut that opens the System Control Panel. To change its icon, right-click it, and select “Properties.” Click the “Shortcut” tab, click “Change Icon,” and choose whatever icon you like.

We tested this on Windows 10’s final October 2020 Update, also known as 20H2. Microsoft may remove the System pane completely from future versions of Windows 10. If so, this command will stop working.

Thanks to [email protected] on the NotebookReview forums for discovering this trick!

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Chris Hoffman
Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek.
Read Full Bio »
Lowell Heddings
Lowell Heddings
Founder and CEO

Lowell is the founder and CEO of How-To Geek. He’s been running the show since creating the site back in 2006. Over the last decade, Lowell has personally written more than 1000 articles which have been viewed by over 250 million people. Prior to starting How-To Geek, Lowell spent 15 years working in IT doing consulting, cybersecurity, database management, and programming work. Read more.

How to access the system configuration utility

The System Information provides a quick way get information about your system, but how you open it depends on what version of Windows you’re using. Here’s how to do it.

Windows 7 or 10: Use the Start Menu

If you’re using Windows 7 or 10, hit Start, type “system information” into the search box, and then select the result.

How to access the system configuration utility

The System Information window opens, giving you access to all kinds of great information about your PC’s hardware and software environment.

How to access the system configuration utility

Windows 7, 8, or 10: Use the Run Box

For some reason, typing “system information” into a Start search doesn’t work in Windows 8. Instead, you’ll have to use the Run box, which you can also use in Windows 7 or 10 if you prefer.

Hit Windows+R to open the Run box. Type “msinfo32” into the “Open” field, and then hit Enter.

How to access the system configuration utility

You should immediately see the System Information panel.

You can also find the msinfo.exe executable in the WindowsSystem32 directory, should you want to make a shortcut for even easier access.

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Lowell Heddings
Lowell is the founder and CEO of How-To Geek. He’s been running the show since creating the site back in 2006. Over the last decade, Lowell has personally written more than 1000 articles which have been viewed by over 250 million people. Prior to starting How-To Geek, Lowell spent 15 years working in IT doing consulting, cybersecurity, database management, and programming work.
Read Full Bio »

Some information relates to prerelease product that may be substantially modified before it’s released. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, with respect to the information provided here.

Represents a configuration file that is applicable to a particular computer, application, or resource. This class cannot be inherited.

Examples

The following code example demonstrates how to use the Configuration class to access configuration file elements.

Remarks

Configuration settings are stored in a hierarchy of configuration files. The Configuration class instance represents the merged view of the configuration settings from all of the configuration files that apply to a specific physical entity, such as a computer, or to a logical entity, such as an application or a Web site. The logical entity can exist on the local computer or on a remote server. For information about configuration files, see Configuring Apps and ASP.NET Configuration Files.

When no configuration file exists for a specified entity, the Configuration object represents the default configuration settings as defined by the Machine.config file.

You can get a Configuration object by using the following classes:

The ConfigurationManager class, if your entity is a client application.

The WebConfigurationManager class, if your entity is a Web application.

The names of the methods that return a Configuration object begin with "Open".

You can also generate a configuration file that represents the configuration settings in a Configuration object. To do this, use one of the following methods:

Call the Save method to create a new configuration file.

Call the SaveAs method to generate a new configuration file at another location.

The names of the methods that create configuration files begin with "Save".

To enable access to configuration settings on a remote computer, use the Aspnet_regiis command-line tool. For more information about this tool, see ASP.NET IIS Registration Tool (Aspnet_regiis.exe). For information about creating and accessing custom configuration settings other than the intrinsic sections included in the .NET Framework, refer to ConfigurationSection.

Notes to Inheritors

The Configuration class provides programmatic access for editing configuration files. You use one of the "Open" methods provided by the WebConfigurationManager class for Web applications or by the ConfigurationManager class for client applications. These methods return a Configuration object, which in turn provides the methods and properties that handle the underlying configuration files. You can access these files for reading or writing configuration information.

You use the GetSection(String) method or the GetSectionGroup(String) method to read configuration information. Note that the user or process that reads must have the following permissions:

Read permission on the configuration file at the current configuration hierarchy level.

Read permissions on all the parent configuration files.

If your application needs read-only access to its own configuration, it is recommended that you use the GetSection method overloads for Web applications. For client application, use the GetSection(String) method.

These methods provide access to the cached configuration values for the current application, which has better performance than the Configuration class.

Note: If you use a static GetSection method that takes a path parameter, the path parameter must refer to the application in which the code is running, otherwise the parameter is ignored and configuration information for the currently running application is returned.

You use one of the Save methods to write configuration information. Note that the user or process that writes must have the following permissions:

Write permission on the configuration file and directory at the current configuration hierarchy level.

Read permissions on all the configuration files.

Properties

Gets the AppSettingsSection object configuration section that applies to this Configuration object.

Specifies a function delegate that is used to transform assembly strings in configuration files.

Gets a ConnectionStringsSection configuration-section object that applies to this Configuration object.

Gets the ContextInformation object for the Configuration object.

Gets the physical path to the configuration file represented by this Configuration object.

Gets a value that indicates whether a file exists for the resource represented by this Configuration object.

Gets the locations defined within this Configuration object.

Gets or sets a value indicating whether the configuration file has an XML namespace.

Gets a collection of the section groups defined by this configuration.

Gets a collection of the sections defined by this Configuration object.

Gets or sets the targeted version of .NET when a version earlier than the current one is targeted.

Specifies a function delegate that is used to transform type strings in configuration files.

Methods

Determines whether the specified object is equal to the current object.

Serves as the default hash function.

Returns the specified ConfigurationSection object.

Gets the Type of the current instance.

Creates a shallow copy of the current Object.

Writes the configuration settings contained within this Configuration object to the current XML configuration file.

Writes the configuration settings contained within this Configuration object to the current XML configuration file.

Writes the configuration settings contained within this Configuration object to the current XML configuration file.

Writes the configuration settings contained within this Configuration object to the specified XML configuration file.

Writes the configuration settings contained within this Configuration object to the specified XML configuration file.

Writes the configuration settings contained within this Configuration object to the specified XML configuration file.