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How to accept a family members spouse

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A family member just got married and you are having difficulty in accepting the newcomer of the family. There can be many reasons for this but if you are reading this article then you have already taken the first step—trying to accept them. Keep reading to get some tips on how to accept a family member’s spouse.

How to accept a family members spouse

  • Moving too fast: It’s understandable to be alarmed if your loved one has gotten married after less than a year of dating, or if they haven’t given you time to get to know the spouse before the marriage.
  • Family drama: If the marriage caused or became entangled in family conflicts, you might feel torn or upset on behalf of a family member.
  • Personality conflict: It’s not always easy when your personality clashes with the personality of your loved one’s spouse. It can be especially hard if you feel that your loved one deserves better.
  • Personal prejudices: If you’re uncomfortable with the fact that the person is gay or bisexual, of a different race, obese, or otherwise different, then you may need to work on dealing with your personal biases.
  • Personal issues: Sometimes it has nothing to do with the other person, such as being afraid that your family member will stop spending time with you or being reminded of a difficult relationship.
  • Concerns about harm: If you’ve noticed clear unkind behavior (such as name-calling, controlling, manipulation, cheating, etc.), then you’ll understandably be worried about your loved one.

How to accept a family members spouse

  • Your loved one may feel that you don’t trust or value their judgment.
  • The spouse may feel awkward or uncomfortable, wondering why you dislike them.
  • Other family members may side with the spouse if you make a scene or cause friction in the family.

How to accept a family members spouse

  • Telling if someone is being abused isn’t always easy.
  • Consider calling an abuse hotline or meeting with a counselor who specializes in abuse. You can describe what you’ve seen and ask for advice handling the situation.
  • Helping someone leave an abusive relationship is no easy task, especially if your loved one doesn’t realize it’s abuse or is still making excuses for it. Some attempts to help can backfire, so research the problem and don’t be afraid to ask an expert for advice.

This article focuses on non-abusive relationships. If your loved one is being abused, try reading our article on helping someone leave an abusive relationship.

How to accept a family members spouse

  • You may have gotten a bad impression. Things may get better with time and once you’ve gotten more acquainted.
  • Remember that just because you don’t “click” with them doesn’t mean that they’re a bad spouse for your loved one.

How to accept a family members spouse

  • “I’ve had some difficulty accepting Wendy. I guess it’s just moving so fast and it startled me. I care a lot about you and it surprised me that you got married to someone I barely know. But I don’t want to alienate her or you. Do you have any advice?”
  • “Sometimes Amil’s jokes make me really uncomfortable and I don’t know what to say.”
  • “Dad, I’ve been kind of struggling with Keiko. I know she makes you happy, and I want you to be happy. But at the same time, I’m still grieving Mom and sometimes it feels like Keiko is trying to be my new mom when I’m just not ready. I think I need some time and space to process because I still miss Mom so much.”
  • “You’ve probably noticed that I’m having trouble getting along with Asher. I get upset when I hear him making comments about your weight. I can see it makes you sad and I hate that. I don’t know what to do when this happens.”

Tip: Your loved one needs to know that this is coming from a place of caring, not judgment. Show that you feel this way because you care about them (even if it turns out that you’re misguided), not because you’re judging their spouse.

After creating a family group, explore Microsoft Family Safety features and benefits by adding family members!

If someone is already part of a family group, they must leave or be removed from that group before joining another. They can also create a new Microsoft account to associate with a new family group. Family organizers can add family members by following the steps below.

Using a web browser, visit family.microsoft.com. Sign into your Family Safety account.

Click Add a family member.

Enter family member’s phone number or email address and click Next.

Decide family member’s role (member or organizer) and click Next > Invite.

Note: Invitee will receive a link to join via email. It will prompt them to sign into their Microsoft account to accept and join the family group. If they are under statutory age they will also be prompted to request adult consent.

Open the Microsoft Family Safety app .

Scroll down and tap Add a family member.

Enter your family member’s phone number or email address and tap Next.

Decide family member’s role (member or organizer) and tap Invite to family group.

Note: Invitee will receive a link to join via email. It will prompt them to sign into their Microsoft account to accept and join the family group. If they are under statutory age they will also be prompted to request adult consent.

If your family member does not have an Xbox Live account,

Press the Xbox button to open the guide. Then select Sign in and sign into your account.

Press the Xbox button again and select Profile & system > Settings > Account > Family settings > Manage family members > Add to family > Add new.

When your invited family member is prompted to sign into a Microsoft account, press B on your controller. Select Get a new account to allow them to create their new Microsoft account.

When you are prompted, select Add to family.

If your family member has an Xbox Live account on your console,

Press the Xbox button to open the guide. Select Sign in and sign into your account.

Press the Xbox button again and select Profile & system > Settings > Account > Family settings > Manage family members > Add to family.

Select your invited family member’s profile and press the A button on your controller.

If your family member has an Xbox Live account that’s not on your console,

Press the Xbox button to open the guide. Select Sign in and sign into your account.

Press the Xbox button again and select Profile & system > Settings > Account > Family settings > Manage family members > Add to family > Add new.

Allow your invited family member to sign into their Microsoft account. When you are prompted, select Add to family.

Note: Invitee will receive a link to join via email. It will prompt them to sign into their Microsoft account to accept and join the family group. If they are under statutory age they will also be prompted to request adult consent.

Unfortunately, approximately 30% of child sexual abuse perpetrators are family members of the child. As a parent, you have the power to intervene in these difficult situations so that children can begin to heal.

First, we need to acknowledge how painful it is when family members are the perpetrators of abuse, especially if that family member is close to you personally, like a spouse or one of your other children. No one wants to think a parent or sibling would harm your kids. Also, it can be confusing to love both the perpetrator and victim of abuse. If you find yourself in this difficult situation, here are some specific things you can do.

Protect the Child

Your primary goal is to ensure the child’s safety. You might feel like your loyalties are divided. Trying to protect one person could require hurting another person. Facing these decisions isn’t easy, but make the child your priority. Comfort the child and communicate that you’re there to protect them.

Accept the reality of what’s happening

It’s tempting to ignore the situation or rationalize the perpetrator’s behavior. You might tell yourself that a misunderstanding has occurred or the abuse happened accidentally. Work to be honest and realistic about what’s going on, as hard as that can be. You can’t address a situation that you refuse to acknowledge.

Take care of yourself

Parents who find themselves in this situation can experience strong and confusing emotions. You can feel guilt that you didn’t see sexual abuse sooner. Also, you can feel true sorrow that someone you love is perpetrating. Healthy support is imperative for everyone. Seeking out a mental health professional for yourself as well as your child is a common and healthy route. If you need help finding a counselor, 211 can get you connected with resources in your community.

If you need assistance in understanding the process of reporting abuse, visit How to Report Sexual Abuse in the United States for helpful information about who to contact and what to expect. You could experience a strong desire to keep the abuse quiet, but that only protects the perpetrator, and your goal is to protect the child. It’s not enough for a perpetrator to apologize and guarantee that the abuse will never happen again. Perpetrators need to be held accountable for their actions, and they’ll need resources like counseling to help them recover from unhealthy and dangerous behavior.

Standing by the truth in a situation like this is hard. It takes courage to acknowledge what is going on and address it. Right now, it might seem easier to brush the sexual abuse aside, but try to keep a future-oriented perspective. A child’s well-being has been compromised. With the right help, the child can start healing and hope for a healthy and fulfilling future. You have the power to make things better in the long run, but improvements can only happen if you take action in the present.

Here's how to maintain your integrity in family relationships.

How to accept a family members spouse

Difficult people are everywhere, like it or not. It’s pretty certain that at some point in your life, you’ll come across a challenging person and will have to find a way to deal with them. It would be easy to think, “Why bother?” if being around them causes you grief. But it’s not as easy as that. Sometimes we’re just forced into situations we have little control over.

Being related is one such circumstance. In fact, family members are often the hardest to deal with, because they’re connected to us in a more complicated, intimate way. With difficult acquaintances like friends, colleagues, lovers, or neighbors, you may have to deal with them for a time, either until a conflict between you is resolved, or you are able to remove yourself from the situation. With family, we are almost obligated to go the extra mile for the sake of the integrity of the family group. In other words, personal relationships may affect the family as a whole. If you don’t get along with a family member, it may very well put stress and strain on other familial relationships as well.

So what do you do with those people you may not like very much and may not choose to have in your life, but are forced to deal with because they’re family?

1. Don’t try to fix the difficult person.

Accept them exactly as they are. (This applies to all difficult people, not just family.) It’s tempting to try to help someone you want to care about; you probably will make some efforts to help them. Sometimes it works, but often your efforts will not be rewarded. In fact, trying to fix someone or make their life better may become a huge headache, since the more you do for them, the more they want from you. Accept that they are unable to change, at least at this point in time. Unless you see real change — proof that this person is making an effort to listen and meet you halfway — you can assume that their behavior is what it has always been. It’s important to temper your expectations about what others can and want to do.

2. Be present and direct.

Know that a person who is trying to stir up conflict can easily set you off emotionally, and even physically, possibly raising your heart rate and blood pressure. Try to avoid getting into a fight-or-flight response, which inevitably leads to becoming defensive. You do not want an argument or heated discussion. Stay true to yourself, grounded in your own integrity. Be direct and assertive when you express yourself. Stay focused on how you respond. Know when the discussion or argument has accelerated to the point of no return — meaning it’s no longer about conflict resolution, but just about winning. If it gets to this point, stop the interaction, and leave the conversation.

3. Do encourage difficult people to express themselves.

Let them fully state their point of view about the issue/conflict/problem without interruption. Why do they feel judged or criticized by others? What do they feel people misunderstand about them? What do they want or expect from others? The idea is to remain as neutral as possible. Just listening, rather than trying to engage, may be enough to allow someone to feel like they have the opportunity to say what’s on their mind. Showing respect for another’s differences may go a very long way.

4. Watch for trigger topics.

Inevitably there will be topics that represent points of disagreement and disharmony. Know what these topics are, and be extremely aware when these are brought up. Your past experiences should help you, especially when you are confronted with these delicate subjects. Be prepared to address these issues in a direct, non-confrontational way or to deflect the conflict if the atmosphere becomes too heated.

5. Know that some topics are absolutely off-limits.

Period. History and experiences should tell you that these subjects should be avoided at all costs. That’s not to say that important issues should be permanently avoided. Rather, if your experience dealing with certain issues has left you stressed out or emotionally depleted, and the discussion has not progressed sufficiently along to represent a rapprochement, then it’s best to avoid the discussion until a time when both parties are willing to move it forward in a constructive way.

6. It’s not about you — usually.

Yes, it’s hard not to take things personally, especially when you’re attacked or made to feel responsible for someone else. But if you look at the anatomy of a conflict, you can see how these often play out. Notice how people progressively move through a discussion or argument. Usually, it initially centers around a specific topic/disagreement/response that made a person upset. If allowed to continue, the argument can become heated, accelerating quickly to personal attacks (which often includes trying to make you feel responsible or guilty for not responding the way someone wants you to). If you have been through this kind of interaction before, make a concerted effort to imagine it unfolding before it actually does — and then nip it in the bud.

7. Your own well-being comes first.

While you want to be respectful and attentive to others as much as you can, you don’t want to bend over backwards or twist yourself into a knot just to make someone else happy or satisfied, or to keep the peace. Never allow any personal interaction or relationship to infringe upon or challenge your own well-being. Visualize your boundaries, that protective territory between you and someone else. No one is entitled to occupy your space unless you invite them in.

And then there’s that special situation where families gather together for a special occasion or holiday. it’s best to plan ahead so that you have a good idea about how time will be spent with relatives. Don’t leave too much unplanned time; you don’t want to get into a situation where you’re left alone with a difficult family member with whom you have an issue or conflict — someone who confronts, challenges, incites, aggravates, and basically pushes your buttons. Surround yourself with people you get along with, supportive people who care about you, people who are there to enjoy time together.

How to accept a family members spouse

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These days, social media is the norm for staying connected. Everyone sends and receives news updates instantly. Everyone in your network communicates through texting, posting, and responding to online messages.

Jump ahead to these sections:

When news that someone you know has died hits social circles, you may be wondering what is the appropriate response to that news. Should you pick up the phone and call? Should you send fresh flowers or another sympathy plant? Is it ok to send a text offering condolences? How do you comfort someone who is grieving through text? And, how do you console someone whom you only talk to online?

It’s acceptable to send a text if it makes sense for you to do so. If you only talk online or through text, there’s nothing wrong with responding to the news by sending a text. Finding the right words to say to someone whose loved one has died is never easy. Below you will find a few examples of what to say and when it’s appropriate to say it.

Tip: If someone you know recently lost a loved one, our post-loss checklist can help them sort through the complicated tasks and challenges they might be facing.

Comforting Texts to Send to a Family Member

How to accept a family members spouse

When one of your family members suffers death in their immediate family, it’s a loss that hits close to home. You might not know what to say to express the sorrow that you’re feeling. You might think that giving them space during this time is the best thing to do. It’s not uncommon to pull away from your loved one.

You might not know how to process death and think that nothing you can say will make them feel better. Yet, the opposite is true. When everyone else has moved on, your words of condolences can have a real impact. A shoulder to lean on during this time goes a long way in helping your family member process their grief. There are several things you can say that will leave a lasting impression.

Here are words to comfort someone who lost a loved one over text:

  • “I’m sorry to hear the news of your brother’s passing. Please accept my deepest regrets for your loss.”
  • “I was deeply saddened to hear of your mom’s passing. She was such a great inspiration to me. Please let me know how I can help you during this difficult time.”
  • “Please accept my heartfelt condolences to you and your family on your uncle’s death. I’m sure that his memory will forever live on in your hearts.”
  • “I’m sorry for your loss . My deepest sympathy goes out to you and your family.”
  • “I am sorry for the loss of your dear Fluffy, Aunt Mary. I cannot imagine the pain you are going through right now. Please let me know how I can help you during this difficult time.”
1. “I’m sorry to hear the news of your brother’s passing. Please accept my deepest regrets for your loss.”

When expressing your condolences by text, consider the type of relationship you have with your family members.

Decide whether it’s appropriate to follow up with an in-person visit, or if texting is enough. Depending on your relationship, it may be better to offer support in person .

2. “I was deeply saddened to hear of your mom’s passing. She was such a great inspiration to me. Please let me know how I can help you during this difficult time.”

This type of text acknowledges news of death and has a call to action. When a death occurs, there are many end-of-life matters to attend to.

With this message, you are letting your family members know that you have heard the news, how their loved one has impacted your life, and what she meant to you. You’re also offering your support when needed.

3. “Please accept my heartfelt condolences to you and your family on your uncle’s death. I’m sure that his memory will forever live on in your hearts.”

This condolence message doesn’t need to offer any further call to action. Unless you were close to the uncle, a text message is enough.

4. “I’m sorry for your loss . My deepest sympathy goes out to you and your family.”

When a family member has suffered a loss of a person whom you didn’t know or didn’t know well, a simple message expressing your sympathy, like “sorry for your loss,” is both sufficient and respectful in honoring the death of their loved one.

5. “I am sorry for the loss of your dear Fluffy, Aunt Mary. I cannot imagine the pain you are going through right now. Please let me know how I can help you during this difficult time.”

Acknowledging the impact of the death of a beloved pet on Aunt Mary may be able to help during this time. It honors the bond between a pet and its owner while also offering support as you would with the loss of human life. You can even give a pet sympathy gift to provide some comfort as that person grieves.

Research shows that most people can recover from loss on their own through the passage of time if they have social support and healthy habits.

How to accept a family members spouse

Coping with the loss of a close friend or family member may be one of the hardest challenges that many of us face. When we lose a spouse, sibling or parent our grief can be particularly intense. Loss is understood as a natural part of life, but we can still be overcome by shock and confusion, leading to prolonged periods of sadness or depression. The sadness typically diminishes in intensity as time passes, but grieving is an important process in order to overcome these feelings and continue to embrace the time you had with your loved one.

Everyone reacts differently to death and employs personal coping mechanisms for grief. Research shows that most people can recover from loss on their own through the passage of time if they have social support and healthy habits. It may take months or a year to come to terms with a loss. There is no “normal” time period for someone to grieve. Don’t expect to pass through phases of grief either, as research suggests that most people do not go through stages as progressive steps.

If your relationship with the deceased was difficult, this will also add another dimension to the grieving process. It may take some time and thought before you are able to look back on the relationship and adjust to the loss.

Human beings are naturally resilient, considering most of us can endure loss and then continue on with our own lives. But some people may struggle with grief for longer periods of time and feel unable to carry out daily activities. Individuals with severe grief or complicated grief could benefit from the help of a psychologist or another licensed mental health professional with a specialization in grief.

Moving on with life

Mourning the loss of a close friend or relative takes time, but research tells us that it can also be the catalyst for a renewed sense of meaning that offers purpose and direction to life.

Grieving individuals may find it helpful to use some of the following strategies to help them process and come to terms with loss:

  • Talk about the death of your loved one with friends or colleagues in order to help you understand what happened and remember your friend or family member. Avoidance can lead to isolation and will disrupt the healing process with your support systems.
  • Accept your feelings. You may experience a wide range of emotions from sadness, anger or even exhaustion. All of these feelings are normal and it’s important to recognize when you are feeling this way. If you feel stuck or overwhelmed by these emotions, it may be helpful to talk with a licensed psychologist or other mental health professional who can help you cope with your feelings and find ways to get back on track.
  • Take care of yourself and your family. Eating healthy foods, exercising and getting plenty of sleep can help your physical and emotional health. The grieving process can take a toll on one’s body. Make sure you check in with your loved ones and that they are taking the necessary healthy steps to maintain their health.
  • Reach out and help others dealing with the loss. Spending time with loved ones of the deceased can help everyone cope. Whether it’s sharing stories or listening to your loved one’s favorite music, these small efforts can make a big difference to some. Helping others has the added benefit of making you feel better as well.
  • Remember and celebrate the lives of your loved ones. Anniversaries of a lost loved one can be a difficult time for friends and family, but it can also be a time for remembrance and honoring them. It may be that you decide to collect donations to a favorite charity of the deceased, passing on a family name to a baby or planting a garden in memory. What you choose is up to you, as long as it allows you to honor that unique relationship in a way that feels right to you.

How psychologists can help

Psychologists are trained to help people better handle the fear, guilt or anxiety that can be associated with the death of a loved one. If you need help dealing with your grief or managing a loss, consult with a psychologist or other licensed mental health professional. Psychologists can help people build their resilience and develop strategies to get through their sadness. Practicing psychologists use a variety of evidence-based treatments — most commonly psychotherapy — to help people improve their lives. Psychologists, who have doctoral degrees, receive one of the highest levels of education of any health care professional.

This article was adapted from a March 2011 post by Katherine C. Nordal, PhD.

The full text of articles from APA Help Center may be reproduced and distributed for noncommercial purposes with credit given to the American Psychological Association. Any electronic reproductions must link to the original article on the APA Help Center. Any exceptions to this, including excerpting, paraphrasing or reproduction in a commercial work, must be presented in writing to the APA. Images from the APA Help Center may not be reproduced

    As tax attorneys in Columbus, Ohio, Nardone Limited routinely advises sole proprietors on when a taxpayer may deduct certain business expenses on Schedule C of their Form 1040 U.S. Individual Income Tax Return. Many sole proprietors seek to maximize their business expense deductions; however, sole proprietors must be cognizant of what may and may not be deducted to potentially avoid further scrutiny by Revenue Agents during Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) audits and examinations. When the IRS audits or examines a tax return, one of the items the Revenue Agent will scrutinize and look for is deductions relating to business travel expenses. This is the third article of a three-part series that addresses deductible travel expenses for sole proprietors. Specifically, this article provides a discussion of when traveling expenses relating to spouses and family members may be deducted. See the first article of the series, Deductible Business Travel Expenses for Sole Proprietors, for a general overview of deductible traveling expenses, and the second article of the series, Deductible Transportation, Lodging, and Meal Expenses for Sole Proprietors, for an overview of deductible transportation, lodging, and meal expenses.

Separating Personal and Business Expenses

    As discussed in our prior articles, when a trip combines both business and personal activities, then a taxpayer may only deduct travel expenses if the trip is primarily for a business purpose. Treas. Reg. §1.162–2(b)(1). If the trip is primarily personal in nature, then travel expenses are not deductible, even if the taxpayer conducts some business activities during the trip. Further, when the trip is primarily for business purposes, a taxpayer may deduct travel expenses that are: (i) reasonable and necessary in conducting business and (ii) directly attributable to conducting business. Treas. Reg. §1.162–2(a).

    One issue that many sole proprietors face when preparing their Form 1040 U.S. Individual Income Tax Return is allocating travel expenses between business and personal expenses.  This issue is further complicated when a spouse or family member accompanies the sole proprietor on a business trip. In general, a spouse’s or family member’s travel expenses are personal expenses and therefore, are not deductible. But, travel expenses relating to a spouse or family members may be deducted in limited circumstances.

Requirements to Deduct Business Travel Expenses Relating to a Spouse or Family Member

    For a sole proprietor to deduct the travel expenses of a spouse or family member, the spouse or family member must: (i) be an employee or business associate who has a bona fide business purpose for traveling and (ii) otherwise be allowed to deduct the travel expense. See Internal Revenue Code (“I.R.C.”) §274(m)(3); Treas. Reg. § 1.162-2(c).

    A bona fide business purpose exists when a sole proprietor can prove a real business purpose for the spouse’s or family member’s presence on the business trip. See Treas. Reg. § 1.162-2(c). But, the bona fide business purpose cannot entail mere incidental business services, such as taking notes or entertaining customers. The spouse or family member’s presence on the trip must be necessary to the sole proprietor’s business. Treas. Reg. § 1.162-2(c). If the spouse or family member is not a business associate or employee with a bona fide business purpose for traveling, who would otherwise be able to deduct the travel expenses, then the sole proprietor must strictly separate the spouse’s or family member’s expenses from the deductible business travel expenses. Treas. Reg. § 1.162-2(c). For example, a sole proprietor may believe that an invitation for a spouse or family member to attend a business meeting or convention establishes their bona fide business purpose. But, simply being invited to, and then attending the meeting, is not enough. Rather, the spouse or family member must also meet the requirements under I.R.C. §274(m)(3), including that the spouse or family member has a bona fide business purpose for attending, to have deductible travel expenses. That is, the spouse’s or family member’s presence must be necessary to conduct the sole proprietor’s business. Ultimately, a sole proprietor who brings a spouse or family member on a business trip must remain cognizant of the circumstances in which the spouse’s or family member’s travel expenses may be deducted.

Conclusion

    Nardone Limited routinely represents individuals and businesses in federal tax matters, including taxpayers who are subjected to an IRS audit or examination by a Revenue Agent. If you are facing an IRS tax audit or examination, or if you wish to learn more about how to adequately maintain your records, contact one of our experienced tax attorneys today.

Posted at 11:58 AM in Tax Law, Generally | Permalink–> Posted by Vince Nardone on May 31, 2018 in Tax Law, Generally | Permalink

One of the advantages of operating your own business is hiring family members. However, employment tax requirements for family employees may vary from those that apply to other employees. The following information may assist you with pointing out some differences to consider.

Child employed by parents

Payments for the services of a child under age 18 who works for his or her parent in a trade or business are not subject to social security and Medicare taxes if the trade or business is a sole proprietorship or a partnership in which each partner is a parent of the child. Refer to the “Covered services of a child” section below. Payments for the services of a child under age 21 who works for his or her parent in a trade or business are not subject to Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA) tax. Payment for the services of a child are subject to income tax withholding, regardless of age.

Covered services of a child

The wages for the services of a child are subject to income tax withholding as well as social security, Medicare, and FUTA taxes if he or she works for:

  • A corporation, even if it is controlled by the child’s parent,
  • A partnership, even if the child’s parent is a partner, unless each partner is a parent of the child, or
  • An estate, even if it is the estate of a deceased parent.

One spouse employed by another

The wages for the services of an individual who works for his or her spouse in a trade or business are subject to income tax withholding and social security and Medicare taxes, but not to FUTA tax. Refer also to Married Couples in Business.

Covered services of a spouse

The wages for the services of a spouse are subject to income tax withholding as well as social security, Medicare, and FUTA taxes if he or she works for:

  • A corporation, even if it is controlled by the individual’s spouse, or
  • A partnership, even if the individual’s spouse is a partner.

Parent employed by child

The wages for the services of a parent employed by his or her child in a trade or business are subject to income tax withholding and social security and Medicare taxes. Wages paid to a parent employed by his or her child are not subject to FUTA tax, regardless of the type of services provided. For additional employment tax information, refer to Publication 15, Circular E, Employer’s Tax Guide, and Publication 51, Circular A, Agricultural Employer’s Tax Guide.

If your parent works for you in your business, the wages you pay to him or her are subject to income tax withholding and social security and Medicare taxes. Social security and Medicare taxes do not apply to wages paid to your parent for services not performed in your business, but they do apply to domestic services if all the following apply:

How to accept a family members spouse

The death of a loved one can leave you feeling empty and alone. While grieving is a natural reaction to your loss, the process can make it hard for you to face your daily responsibilities and find enjoyment in life. You might even feel like the grief will last forever. However, while you will never forget the impact your loved one had on your life, there are strategies to help you cope with death and move toward acceptance.

Expect to be flooded with various emotions. You might anticipate depression, but emotions such as denial, anger, humiliation, guilt and confusion are also common reactions for grieving individuals, reports Mental Health America of York and Adams Counties in the article “Coping with Bereavement.” Expect your moods to fluctuate, and understand that this is perfectly natural. In time, your moods will become more stable again.

Grieve with others, suggests HelpGuide.org in the article, “Coping with Grief and Loss.” Rather than isolate yourself, talk to family members or friends who were also close to your lost loved one. Make connections at the funeral or wake, and consider that you can also provide a shoulder to lean on for others who are experiencing the same sense of loss.

Take care of yourself, reminds Mental Health America. You might experience difficulty sleeping or lack of motivation, but remember to eat healthy, exercise and maintain your hygienic routines. Avoid the use of drugs or alcohol, which might be tempting for grieving individuals. Keep in mind that these seemingly easy escapes can delay your emotional healing and cause physical troubles as well.

Seek counseling if you feel it’s necessary. Not everyone will need counseling, but if you continue to experience intense grief months after your loss, you should consult a mental health expert. This is a condition known as complicated grief. Symptoms include long-term yearning for the deceased, intrusive thoughts, denial, extreme bitterness and feelings of emptiness, HelpGuide explains.

Maintain a sense of humor, especially when remembering your loved one. For example, recall some of his jokes or funniest moments and share them with others who are grieving. Humor is a powerful coping mechanism that can help you move toward acceptance. According to a 2008 study, “Humor, Laughter & Happiness in the Daily Lives of Recently Bereaved Spouses,” psychology researchers discovered that 61 percent of participating widows and 39 percent of widowers over the age of 50 were surprised by the humor they could enjoy five to 24 weeks after the death of a loved one.

Transfer a Vehicle Between Family Members

What Does Transfer Mean ?

When the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) talks about "transfer," we mean a change in the registered or legal ownership of a California registered vehicle. When a vehicle changes owners, whether by sale, gift, inheritance, etc.. and the new owner�s name is placed on the department�s records, that�s a transfer.

For example, when you sell a car:

1. You and the legal owner/lien holder (the person, bank, credit union, etc., that financed the vehicle) if any, release interest! ownership of the vehicle by signing the Certificate of Title.

2. The new owner completes and signs the Application for Transfer by New Owner on the back of the Certificate of Title.

3. The signed title and any other required documents are submitted to DMV for transfer of ownership into the new owner s name.

4. Following completion of the transfer, DMV will issue a new Certificate of Title to the new owner’s) or if there is a lien, to the lien holder.

Are Transfer Requirements Different Between Family Members?

Yes, substantially different. This brochure outlines the differences between a regular transfer and a family member transfer.

What is a family member transfer?

A "family transfer" is when ownership is transferred to or from a:

� spouse
� parent
� child
� grandparent
� grandchild
� sibling

How Is a Family Member Transfer Different from a Regular Transfer?

There are three primary differences between regular transfers and family member transfers:

1. On a regular transfer, use tax based on the purchase price of the vehicle is due at the time of transfer. A family member transfer is exempt from use tax with the exception of a transfer between siblings who are not minors.

2. A regular transfer requires smog certification in most cases before the vehicle can be registered in the new owner�s name. A family member transfer does not require smog certification if the vehicle is currently registered and the biennial smog inspection is not due. (See Smog Certification section)

3. A regular transfer requires the department to reestablish the vehicle value (reclassify) to determine the appropriate Vehicle License Fee due. The license fee is based on the purchase price or current market value of the vehicle is exempt from reclassification of the vehicle value

To establish eligibility for the use tax or reclassification exemption, be sure to let the department know that this is a family member transfer.

What Do I Need to Do for a Family Transfer?

The DMV will require:

� The California Certificate of Title properly signed or endorsed on Line 1 by the registered owner’s) shown on the title. The new owner must complete the New Registered Owner section on the back of the title and sign it.

� A Statement of Facts (REG 256 Rev. 1/96 or later) for use tax and smog exemption, if applicable.

� Odometer disclosure for vehicles less than 10 years old.

Additional fees, such as registration fees, may also be due.

California Certificate of Title

For information on how to fill out the Certificate of Title please refer to the brochure titled, How To Complete the California Certificate of Title To Transfer Vehicle Ownership (HTVR-5).

Notice of Release of Liability

The Notice of Release of Liability (REG 138) must be completed and mailed by the seller to the DMV. The seller is legally required to report the transfer to the DMV within five days.

What Fees Are Due?

The fee to transfer ownership is $15. If the transfer fee is not paid within 30 days of transfer, a penalty fee of $10 is added.

The registration renewal fees may be due. If the registration has expired and a Planned Non-Operation status is not on file, you will be charged for past due fees and penalties.

California law requires the inspection and certification of most vehicle emission control systems every other year upon renewal of registration. This is called the biennial (every other year) smog requirement. If you are renewing your registration during a biennial period, a smog exemption for the family member transfer does not apply.

Fees will be determined by the DMV when your application is submitted.

Can Transfer of Title Be Made Without Payment
of Registration Renewal Fees?

If the vehicle has a Planned Non-Operation status on file with the DMV and the transfer fee is deposited prior to the vehicle�s Planned Non-Operation expiration date, a transfer may be completed without payment of registration renewal fees.

California law requires the inspection and certification of most vehicle emission control systems every other year upon renewal of registration. This is called the biennial (every other year) smog requirement. If you are renewing your registration during a biennial period, a smog exemption for the family member transfer does not apply.